The final shot?
Old 10-30-2016   #1
scigeek
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The final shot?

Have you ever taken shot after shot of one subject in an effort to capture an elusive something about the subject (but you're not sure what it is)?

I've worked with this image for weeks now. I went to see the effigy again yesterday, and I think I'm done.

Tomb effigy - Leica 111c, uncoated 3.5/5cm Elmar.

I took another good look at the lady yesterday, along with the inscription.
Dame Mary (died 1612) is (I quote from the tomb) "expecting a joyful resurrection".

That look? Smug!
Dame Mary, having ticked all the ecclesiastical boxes of the time, is damn sure she's going to be resurrected. She's probably pretty sure she's first in the queue!

I hope she is, both resurrected and first in the queue I mean. Meanwhile I thank her for being such a still and patient photographic subject.

The effigy is carved in alabaster by the way. Its softer than marble, and capable of being carved in great detail.
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Old 10-30-2016   #2
sreed2006
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There probably is no better way to understand all the constituent parts in the art of photography than to re-photograph a subject on many different days and at different times of the day.

There was a huge oak tree near where I used to live that had a swing hanging from a branch and a park bench at the base of the tree. I took many pictures there, having gotten over my allergy to revisiting the same subject. The effort and repetition was rewarding. I found many ways to get a good picture there, from close up to off in the distance. Now I live far from that tree and I am on a search for another subject that can be just as rewarding.
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Old 10-30-2016   #3
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Oh, yes, during the years there have been a few things I photographed and re-photographed obsessively. There was even a particular statue like in the OPs post. I could swear, one time it jumped in despair as I approached.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sreed2006 View Post
There probably is no better way to understand all the constituent parts in the art of photography than to re-photograph a subject on many different days and at different times of the day.

...
Yes, I agree. It's somewhat infuriating when you approach a subject from all angles, with different light, with different camera or film or lens or whatever, only to get something that is still not quite right. What is it that you see in it? What do you hope to carve out of it? Difficult to say. What's not difficult to say is that you learn a lot.

.
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Old 10-30-2016   #4
scigeek
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Quote:
Originally Posted by telenous View Post
Oh, yes, during the years there have been a few things I photographed and re-photographed obsessively. There was even a particular statue like in the OPs post. I could swear, one time it jumped in despair as I approached.
.

I know exactly what you mean.
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Old 10-30-2016   #5
Richard G
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Not even close. This little bronze has preoccupied me for a few years now. I went back again just last week, but had the wrong lens. Here's an older one. I've taken nearly a hundred I think.

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Old 10-30-2016   #6
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Yes, been there, done that. Sigh.
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Old 10-30-2016   #7
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You've left the inscription cropped. Wouldn't it be more complete stepping back a few steps and including the inscription and then cropping to a 4x5 or 1x1 ratio?
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Old 10-30-2016   #8
davidnewtonguitars
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You showed that photo, or one like it, in another thread, I'm glad you have given it its own thread, it is worth discussing further.
If I were standing in front of it, I would want to feel all over the carving, I doubt I would be invited back there.

I think it would be fun to see 25 different shots of the same carving, with no "poll" or competition of which one is best, just a study of it, and not a final statement.
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Old 10-30-2016   #9
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I had an old windmill out in the desert that I must have photographed at least 1,000 times and never got the photograph I thought was there.

The rancher finally tore the thing down, I think out of spite since he was tired of seeing me walk out there.

I have a couple other subjects that I have taken to sitting in front of for some time, trying to understand what I am seeing that keeps bringing me back.

I have actually thought of bringing someone else along, but now I'm afraid that they will walk up, take one snapshot, and it will be the photograph I have been striving to capture for years.
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Old 10-30-2016   #10
Roger Hicks
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All too often, the first pic is the best.

As well, therefore, to be as careful as possible within the necessary time constraints,

Cheers,

R.
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Old 10-30-2016   #11
rfaspen
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Either the first pic or the last. Not so often the in-between.

But, yeah.....that sounds familiar. Digital facilitates the process -- for good or bad.
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Old 10-30-2016   #12
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I've been going to the same spot for years trying to get that great shot. I like some of them but like I may give up:


Pentax 6x7 TMY-2 HC-110h by John Carter, on Flickr
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Old 10-30-2016   #13
Richard G
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
All too often, the first pic is the best.

As well, therefore, to be as careful as possible within the necessary time constraints,

Cheers,

R.
If not the first shot, then the first visit. So you're very right about using the time well. Often I get the shot on the first visit because time is in excess, like waiting for my son to finish rowing training. But there is also the reverse of this luxury. Three of the best shots I've taken I was on quick errands under instruction. Had to sneak the camera out of the house. Took one or two quick frames, seemingly on the fly, but had seen something, concentrated for a moment and moved on. Returning to those scenes: the shop has closed down, the bank has been repainted or the same scene is still there, supposedly, but it no longer has any magic at all for some reason and the puzzle is how I saw anything there, and how it worked as a photograph.

Second of two frames, head tilted on the side as I had the shopping in one hand, blazing sun. They've painted the bank some awful brown and this is not possible now. My stealth camera, Leica II with uncoated 50 Elmar.

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Old 10-30-2016   #14
Roger Hicks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard G View Post
If not the first shot, then the first visit. So you're very right about using the time well. Often I get the shot on the first visit because time is in excess, like waiting for my son to finish rowing training. But there is also the reverse of this luxury. Three of the best shots I've taken I was on quick errands under instruction. Had to sneak the camera out of the house. Took one or two quick frames, seemingly on the fly, but had seen something, concentrated for a moment and moved on. Returning to those scenes: the shop has closed down, the bank has been repainted or the same scene is still there, supposedly, but it no longer has any magic at all for some reason and the puzzle is how I saw anything there, and how it worked as a photograph.
Dear Richard,

Sure. Everything in this realm is at best a rule of thumb. For "first visit" see http://rogerandfrances.eu/photography/too-much though that's pretty much "first visit with a camera".

There's a story I half remember of a Zen master trying to paint a perfect circle in front of his star pupil. Each time, it went wrong. The star pupil went for a pee. Quickly, while he was away, the master painted the circle. The pupil, when he came back, pronounced it perfect.

Cheers,

R.
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Old 10-30-2016   #15
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This signpost on Bodmin Moor has me intrigued and I keep going back. This is probably the best version I have taken.



Signpost Bodmin Moor revisited by John Bragg, on Flickr
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Old 10-30-2016   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Bragg View Post
This signpost on Bodmin Moor has me intrigued and I keep going back. This is probably the best version I have taken. . . .
Dear John,

The more you look at it, the better (and more difficult) it gets. But not many on here will know about Warleggan, at least in the real (or supernatural) world: to hell with Poldark (as possibly with some of the inhabitants of Warleggan).

Cheers,

R.
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Old 10-30-2016   #17
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Thanks Roger

Here is Rev Densham's pulpit.


The pulpit in Warleggan Church, from where Rev Frederick Densham preached to an empty congregation. by John Bragg, on Flickr

Cheers, John.
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Old 10-30-2016   #18
gb hill
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I love going back to Old Salem here in North Carolina. I was there just yesterday. I've photographed many of the same places. I'll keep going back as long as I'm able. Here is a random photo from a past visit.
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Old 10-31-2016   #19
scigeek
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbrooks View Post
You've left the inscription cropped. Wouldn't it be more complete stepping back a few steps and including the inscription and then cropping to a 4x5 or 1x1 ratio?
Ha! Therein lies a tale.

I took two shots like you describe. Blurred - I forgot to extend the lens!
bUt then looking back through all the shots I took, including the blurred ones, I realised I either go for the documentary shot, or for the lady herself.
I went for the lady.

A learning process for me, and a good one.
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Old 10-31-2016   #20
David Hughes
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Hmm, well, um, I don't know about art but I do like to keep a record of how commonplace things that don't get photographed look over time. There's not enough photographs of commonplace things, scenery and so on and once they've gone it's too late.

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