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Sumo_du_Jour
08-04-2004, 15:46
I know the forum isn't meant for promotion, this brave girl is not after money or fame, and I'm pretty sure she doesn't use a Rangefinder.

She gives us photos of a part of the world none of us are likely to ever see. Her story proves the power of the image, and the internet.

The "dead zone" around Chernobyl...
http://www.kiddofspeed.com/default.htm

rover
08-04-2004, 16:05
Sumo, I have seen this and a long discussion that in fact she perhaps is not being 100% truthful about her visit to the Dead Zone. Speculation is that she took the tourist bus tour with lots of folks and built the story of her motorcycle ride around the photos she took while there.

Doug
08-04-2004, 20:54
I too have seen this before. Several of the photos include the motorcycle or obvious m/c gear apparently in the described site... Not being familiar with what is reasonable in that region, I have a hard time saying it isn't credible. Nevertheless, the photos are fascinating, and it's a good story. :-)

Laika
08-05-2004, 01:40
Originally posted by Doug
I too have seen this before. Several of the photos include the motorcycle or obvious m/c gear apparently in the described site... Not being familiar with what is reasonable in that region, I have a hard time saying it isn't credible. Nevertheless, the photos are fascinating, and it's a good story. :-)

I too thought the story was cool but later came across some discussions saying it was a twisted version of the truth at best. It turns out it’s a standard “dead zone” tour, no bikes are allowed (but she took her helmet along for the photos) and she had her husband, friend and the area guide along.

Have a read here

http://www.ministry-of-information.co.uk/blog/archives/000331.htm

Also at a local photo festival here in Australia a couple of months ago one of the visiting European photographers had shots from the "dead zone", some shots had very similar framing to a couple from Elena's site ... I guess this photographer got the same tour ... it kinda spoilt his images for me.

taffer
08-05-2004, 01:49
The 'Ministry-of-Information' ? Very 'Brazilesque' (the movie, not the country).

I remember reading the story and being amazed. In the end, if it's true or not... is it that important? (think about the best-seller DaVinci code, ie.)

Laika
08-05-2004, 02:15
Originally posted by taffer
The 'Ministry-of-Information' ? Very 'Brazilesque' (the movie, not the country).

I remember reading the story and being amazed. In the end, if it's true or not... is it that important? (think about the best-seller DaVinci code, ie.)

Important? ....I'll need to see your 27b-6 ;)

taffer
08-05-2004, 02:17
HAHAHAHAHAHAHA !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

WE'LL BE BACK ! :D

LOL !!!

oftheherd
08-05-2004, 03:03
Originally posted by taffer
The 'Ministry-of-Information' ? Very 'Brazilesque' (the movie, not the country).

I remember reading the story and being amazed. In the end, if it's true or not... is it that important? (think about the best-seller DaVinci code, ie.)

Point well taken, but still, why should we as photographers not be concerned about truthfulness in the medium of our hobby/profession? I think she could have made a good story telling the truth. Some of what she says about radiation doesn't seem to hold water. For example, how can the asphalt be safe and the shoulders not? Did the radiation accident wipe out the wind in that area?

But still, the photos are interesting for themselves, which is why I believe she could have made a good story telling the truth of how she was there.

taffer
08-06-2004, 15:27
Yeah, that's exactly my point. As you say the photos are interesting enough and they were real (at least that I know). Yes, she could have made a nice story telling the truth, but would we know about that story then ?

Of course it was a cheat, and up to a point that's incorrect, ok, but all in all, I liked it when read it, that's why I say it's not that important now. I remember reading a debate about the famous Capa's picture of a militian being shot in the Cerro Murriano battle during the Spanish civil war, with some people claiming it was a fake shot.

That photo was (and is) a symbol, and if it was a fake or not has lost its importance after all this time. It tells something and gives a message, for me that's the really important thing about it.

Originally posted by oftheherd
Point well taken, but still, why should we as photographers not be concerned about truthfulness in the medium of our hobby/profession?

But your question is a really good one ! Could we have our own Philosophy of Photography forum ??? :D