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Roger Hicks
07-14-2010, 11:20
...or a variant thereon, was a surprisingly common reaction to my M9 at Arles. Others asked, "Are you happy with it?" Several were delighted to be able to give it a try.

Quite a few of those who commented were exhibitors. People who care enough to go to the biggest gathering of fine art photographers in the world, never mind the hassle of organizing an exhbition, probably qualify as 'real' photographers. This pretty much gives the lie to those who say that 'real' photographers don't care about equipment. Then again, most of the professionals I know care about their kit.

Quite a lot of Leicas there too. Who's going to be there next year? Where do you get comments about your camera? Another place it happens for me is photokina. And Focus in the UK.

Cheers,

R.

mfunnell
07-25-2010, 05:44
This appears to have received no comment the first time around - but this is the first time I've seen the thread so I'll say something:

I seem to get comments about my cameras regularly but infrequently. Those infrequent occasions are usually when I'm using something perceived as "unusual" -

* When using my Elmar-M 50. I've often been asked "is that a Leica" even when I've been using my Hexar RF. Put a different lens on and I'm seldom asked.

* When dropping film off to be developed and printed (usually in a camera store). Lots of people in those places have a real interest in the gear you're using and why you keep using film. And that's mostly because it feeds one or other of their own interests. RF cameras are particularly good for this - a Canon 30V gets almost no comment, while a Canon F-1n gets more than one and my M3 often ignites a long discussion.

* When using a big white Canon telephoto (my 100-400 zoom). In an obvious "wildlife" setting I've frequently been directed towards good opportunities - presumably because I'm assumed to have the gear to get the shot, and that is often stated ("you've got the right camera for it").

* When using a lens with a large diameter objective lens (75 'lux, EF 50mm/f1.2, EF-S 17-55mm/f2.8 - or the aforementioned white zoom) which seems to encourage the presumption that I'm pursuing news, or am in some other way a working pro.

* At events such as the OPEC conference (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mfunnell/sets/72157601924787455/) (really the APEC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/APEC) conference) in Sydney in 2007, where a lot of "counterculture" types where around. At that event and other, lower key, things - like protests against our wonderful internet censorship plans - I see a lot more people than usual using film cameras. If I'm using something identifiably unsual (like an M3 with collapsible lens, or a Contax G2) I'll often be approached for discussion - whereas with a film SLR (say, my FM3a) I tend to blend in with the other film-using crowd (the only kinds of events I've seen where "crowd" can even be talked about as "film-using" these days).

My guess is that an awful lot of people have at least a casual interest in photography - and know that everyone else does too. But if you're seen with something most people don't have (an obviously expensive lens, or an "old" film camera that looks to be used by choice rather than default) then you're seen as "a photographer" rather than as a schmuck with a camera. (Little to they know!)

If you fit the bill then some percentage of people will ask. Usually out of genuine interest, and if you engage them then pleasant discussion can result. That's my experience, anyway.

...Mike

Pickett Wilson
07-25-2010, 05:50
I guess an M2 or M3 draws the most interest from people, although that isn't frequent. My 1D MkIV and 5D MkII's with big white zooms don't get any attention. My small town is full of soccer moms with both those cameras, so it takes something 60 years old to get their attention.

Leigh Youdale
07-25-2010, 05:53
I was out photographing in a local bar last night (for historical purposes only!) and although I wasn't approached I noticed a lot of people looking very hard at my M6 and obviously trying to figure out what the unusual camera was.

Leigh Youdale
07-25-2010, 05:54
I guess an M2 or M3 draws the most interest from people, although that isn't frequent. My 1D MkIV and 5D MkII's with big white zooms don't get any attention. My small town is full of soccer moms with both those cameras, so it takes something 60 years old to get their attention.

I'm over 60. What would be my chances?
OTOH my wife says I've got delusions of adequacy!

Keith
07-25-2010, 06:01
Crown Graphic ... makes their jaws drop every time ... anywhere!

oftheherd
07-25-2010, 06:03
Yesterday at one of the local Photo Walks, not many people said anything, but I noticed several looking at my film RF cameras. Nothing but digital with big zooms for them. I think a lot felt sorry for me. :D

Some were interested. The walk leader and a couple more, but seemed to think it was just an oddity from their past. But one gentleman was so intrigued he put them all together on our table and took several photos. He really seemed interested in the fact that anyone would actually use not only film cameras, but such old ones.

I don't guess that has much to do with the M-9, but I found it interesting.

Roger Hicks
07-25-2010, 08:18
@ Mike -- Numerous interesting observations; thanks. Arles probably attracts a lot of 'alternative' people too, so this could be a common thread in what happens.

@ Leigh: They weren't pissed enough to come over and ask? I thought (and have indeed noticed, when they travel) that your countrymen are rarely averse to large quantities of beer, though some get a bit defensive when you don't mention your excellent Australian wines in the next breath.

@ Keith: Stop pissing about with dinky cameras, buy a Super Technika 5x7!

@ Oftheherd: I'd feel sorry for them, carrying those overweight cameras and lenses around.

@ Double Negative: Yes, the car parallel has to be exact.

Cheers,

R.

Ducky
07-25-2010, 08:33
my wife says I've got delusions of adequacy!

I gotta remember that one.

I was changing film at one place and drew a few comments, but otherwise not too much notice. I do notice that people are less camera shy when i shoot the leica.

Brian Sweeney
07-25-2010, 08:34
On vacation, my M8 received a "Nice Camera" comment from a DSLR user. We were on the USS Yorktown CV-10 Aircraft Carrer, now a floating museum.

colyn
07-25-2010, 09:11
Crown Graphic ... makes their jaws drop every time ... anywhere!

Crown Graphic with a pinhole. That also drums up interest...

jackbaty
07-25-2010, 09:12
So far the Hasselblad 500C/M gets the most attention and comments. Surprisingly, the Olympus E-P1 attracts more questions and comments than the M4. But I'd much rather *answer* questions about the Leica than the Olympus!

D.O'K.
07-25-2010, 09:12
My Rolleiflex attracts a surprising amount of comment from women--always positive, always pleasant...

Regards,
D.

colyn
07-25-2010, 09:14
[QUOTE=Ducky;1373927I was changing film at one place and drew a few comments, but otherwise not too much notice. I do notice that people are less camera shy when i shoot the leica.[/QUOTE]

When shooting film in downtown Fort Worth I sometimes hear "is film still being made?" but otherwise most don't even notice when I'm shooting..

jbielikowski
07-25-2010, 09:28
yap, Rolleiflex is a great chick magnet.

paulfish4570
07-25-2010, 10:01
I had my FED-2d with me in a florida hardware store. An older gdentleman asked if it were a Leica. My bride said, "He wishes it were." I said, "No, but it is a Soviet copy."

I was shooting a Bessa R at a flea market in the spring. A big fellow complimented my kit, and said it was nice to see someone shooting film ...

Mackinaw
07-25-2010, 10:12
Yesterday I was a "Ragtime Festival" at Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan (for those outside of the U.S., Greenfield Village and the Henry Ford Museum are two highly regarded U.S. historical attractions). At one of the many events I attended one guy commented on my MP and an actress came over and asked questions about the camera and the lens (Canon 50/0.95). I also get a lot of comments about my MP at art fairs.

Jim B.

david.elliott
07-25-2010, 10:43
Roger,

I get the occasional question about my cameras from other photographers I see out and about on the street. Of course, the occasional question sometimes comes from whoever I happen to be interacting with during my errands, such as the greeting lady at Lowes.

Oddly enough, all questions or comments have been with regard to my bessa / leica. Nobody seems interested in my Rolleiflex. :(

Usually I hand my camera over to the interested person for them to look at and take a shot or two. The usual reaction from photographers used to dslrs is "wow what a viewfinder!"

Roger Hicks
07-25-2010, 10:46
Roger,

I get the occasional question about my cameras from other photographers I see out and about on the street. Of course, the occasional question sometimes comes from whoever I happen to be interacting with during my errands, such as the greeting lady at Lowes.

Oddly enough, all questions or comments have been with regard to my bessa / leica. Nobody seems interested in my Rolleiflex. :(

Usually I hand my camera over to the interested person for them to look at and take a shot or two. The usual reaction from photographers used to dslrs is "wow what a viewfinder!"
Dear Dave,

Which is in itself interesting, the more so in the light of what others have said.

Cheers,

R.

david.elliott
07-25-2010, 10:52
Agreed Roger.

I mentioned it in another thread recently, but I think nobody is interested in my rolleiflex because they assume I am a surveyor. There is always a lot of construction going on in this area. I almost always use my rollei on a tripod, so it does rather look like surveyor's tools. :P

John Lawrence
07-25-2010, 11:00
I sometimes get comments about my Leicas, but usually in places and at times when I'd least expect them. Once I was getting a cup of tea at an agricultural show, Leica in hand, when the lady pouring the tea started chatting about the camera. Another time I was photographing the London to Brighton veteran car run, and for a hoot thought I'd take a few shots with my Leica III. I'd taken about two pictures when one of the cars stopped, a chap got out and said, "is that an old Leica?" and thus a conversation started. I learnt from him that many veteran car enthusiasts were also interested in old cameras, old watches etc.

Of course studios are another place where comments about gear abound. I've lost count of the times I've taken a Leica out in the studio and heard, "borrow your Grandad's camera have you?" or "I'll go and get the flash powder"!

John

MartinP
07-25-2010, 11:21
I almost always use my rollei on a tripod, so it does rather look like surveyor's tools.

Bizarrely I had exactly the same comment about a Mamiya C3 in town here. I wonder if there is a mystery source of pictures of theodolites that people have seen somewhere - maybe an adventure film about surveyors ?

About the only other time anyone ever commented, I had my Zorki-1 mistaken for a barnack Leica when I was in Brussels using it as my weekend happy-snaps camera.

Both occasions were not really related to a good comprehension of specifically what older film cameras are, so there wasn't really any cross-media artistic curiosity going on, and if anyone said I was being arty I'd be the one looking astonished.

gdmcclintock
07-25-2010, 11:38
I like to sit at Times Square after work and photograph the wildlife. I usually shoot with a Leica M6 or M8. Occasionally I use a Fuji GW690III or a Voigtlander Bessa III. If someone asks me about the camera I am using, it's usually the Voigtlander.

david.elliott
07-25-2010, 11:39
Bizarrely I had exactly the same comment about a Mamiya C3 in town here. I wonder if there is a mystery source of pictures of theodolites that people have seen somewhere - maybe an adventure film about surveyors ?



That is pretty funny. If you find the adventure film, let me know!

Brian Sweeney
07-25-2010, 12:11
Also last week on vacation, using the pool in the evening, a man asked about my Olympus EP2 with the Nikkor 5cm F1.4 on it. Asked how I could be using a rangefinder lens on a camera with an electronic viewfinder.

He had an M8, "Nice Camera" I said.

Doug
07-25-2010, 13:00
While on vacation with my Fuji GS645S another tourist stared hard at it, perhaps trying to figure what it was. It is rather odd looking with that "'roo bar" on the front. He didn't initiate a conversation; perhaps I should have!

I've had a several comments mistaking my M8 for a film camera, showing interest in this older looking rig. Sometimes it's easier to just let the film assumption stand...

kshapero
07-25-2010, 13:09
Any thing using film gets stares.

rjbuzzclick
07-25-2010, 13:18
I rarely get any comments, but then again, I'm usually in less populated areas. I did get a "That's an old one!" from a passing couple while out with my Speed Graphic a few weeks ago.

doolittle
07-25-2010, 13:51
The shutter noise from my FM2n usually gets funny looks, especially from people using a digital camera at that moment.

Roger Hicks
07-25-2010, 13:59
That is pretty funny. If you find the adventure film, let me know!

Well, SOMEONE has to survey the foundations when you're building a new temple to Bel-Shamharoth.

Or maybe not. Look at the way they always fall down in the last scene...

But maybe an olive-drab tripod and an orange TLR is the way to get ignored. Except, perhaps, by the local Residents' Committees and NIMBYs. The idea of 'unobtrusiveness through conspicuity' is one I've heard before: wear a high-visibility vest and everyone assumes you're there on official business.

Cheers,

R.

Doug
07-25-2010, 14:09
...But maybe an olive-drab tripod and an orange TLR is the way to get ignored. Except, perhaps, by the local Residents' Committees and NIMBYs. The idea of 'unobtrusiveness through conspicuity' is one I've heard before: wear a high-visibility vest and everyone assumes you're there on official business.
How about a green Leica on a yellow tripod? :)

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/forums/../photopost/data/500/080418-34big.jpg
(FWIW, Roger, downtown Valletta)

vincentbenoit
07-25-2010, 15:09
The Rolleiflex gets plenty of stares in some parts of the city where I live. When using a Leica it's the accessory viewfinder that seems to be the real attention-grabber. That, or a yellow or red filter on the lens. Or taking a reading with an incident light meter...
Vincent

sleepyhead
07-25-2010, 15:51
I've been on vacation in the Stockholm archipelago for the past couple of weeks with my Hasselblad.
Several older Swedish gentlemen have come up to me and said things like "now that's a fine old Hasselblad", but younger people have had no interest or are not impressed.
But my kids love it when I pop the waist level finder open and let them look through it!

Vince Lupo
07-25-2010, 15:52
Contaflex TLR without question, particularly with the 85/2 Sonnar on it. But, while on the New York subway a few weeks ago, I had someone inquire about my Olympus E-P2 hanging around my neck.

Keith
07-25-2010, 16:11
I haven't had a chance to go out in public with my 67 Pentax yet but I would have to supect the odd stunned look at the size of the thing when I do!

Roberto V.
07-25-2010, 16:14
My chick magnet is definitely my Contaflex SLR, girls always ask about it. But the camera which gets the most comments from people is my old Kodak 3A (which is now lensless, it donated its lens to a 6x17 I'm building).

Doug
07-25-2010, 16:15
Keith, I don't recall getting any comments when out and about with the 67II. Maybe I missed the stunned looks... :)

SolaresLarrave
07-25-2010, 16:18
My Leicas used to get some people's attention, but it's never been like the reactions I get with my Nikon S2. In the few weeks I've owned my S2 I've gotten more comments about it than all the time I've carried Leicas around.

Oddly enough, my Nikon D700 has elicited the exact same comment some three times, from someone in Chicago: "What a beautiful camera!"

This is the body, battery pack and the honking 24-70 f2.8 zoom...

BTW, there seems to be a lot of women getting interested in photography. 98 percent of the people who made comments about my S2 were young ladies, telling me they were taking a film photography class in college. Sounds like an archeology technique... :confused: Oh, well...

Keith
07-25-2010, 16:35
Keith, I don't recall getting any comments when out and about with the 67II. Maybe I missed the stunned looks... :)


I think the perception of the Pentax would have a lot to do with the physical dimensions of the person using it. In the hands of a big person it would probably look fairly normal I suspect.

Karen Nakumura of 'photoethnography' has a photog friend who uses one in the streets apparently ... at five feet tall and weighing less than one hundred pounds she would make that camera look huge I'd imagine!

Pablito
07-25-2010, 16:53
... People who care enough to go to the biggest gathering of fine art photographers in the world, never mind the hassle of organizing an exhbition, probably qualify as 'real' photographers.
R.

I would not attribute their presence at Arles to being "real" necessarily. I think they qualify as people who choose to go to Arles, and have the resources and opportunity to do so. In my experience, they range from utterly "real," genuine, generous and sincere to opportunistic, pretentious and phony. Just like at every other photo festival.

35mmdelux
07-25-2010, 16:57
Crown Graphic ... makes their jaws drop every time ... anywhere!

yea, especially if you carry the beast. dont forget the flash bulb.

35mmdelux
07-25-2010, 16:58
The shutter noise from my FM2n usually gets funny looks, especially from people using a digital camera at that moment.

I guess they would jump if they heard the ka-boom of my Hasselblad.

koniczech
07-25-2010, 17:22
I wish I got that response! With my tendency to stare at people's (D)SLR's, it's too bad the attention is never reciprocated...

I would love to talk- in person- about Yashicas and Leicas and film.

Someday.

Keith
07-25-2010, 22:12
Hassy's are pussy cats compared to the big Pentax ... I wonder if there is actually a camera with a louder shutter than the 67? :eek:

Juan Valdenebro
07-25-2010, 22:52
When out with my Hasselblad, people who don't know me tell me it's a nice and big camera, and when I use my XA, people who know me tell me don't you like good cameras anymore? :)

Cheers,

Juan

Doug
07-25-2010, 23:28
Hassy's are pussy cats compared to the big Pentax ... I wonder if there is actually a camera with a louder shutter than the 67? :eek:I'll cite the same Fuji GS645S I mentioned earlier, as it makes a loud CLACK upon releasing the shutter. It's actually the shot counter indexing, louder than the tinny-sounding GW670III shot counter... On an undeveloped stretch of sandy beach in Hawaii I walked up near a person sunbathing/reading and included them in a "beachscape" photo with the surf in the background. When I released the shutter she visibly jumped, startled... It's so noisy it might rival the big P67.

john neal
07-26-2010, 00:07
I don't get many comments, but a few recent instances when out with the MP:-

Chelsea Flower Show - a pro came over to ask if I was using a M2 (i's black paint, so I wish) - he refused to believe that the MP was back in production. I had to show him the serial no.

Hampton Court Palace flower show - exchanged nods with a M7 user, we were both being dragged along by wives, so no chance to stop & talk. Later the same day, I saw a guy with a huge Nikon DSLR kit around his neck - he looked at my MP longingly and then scowled at his gear, almost like he hated it - very odd.

Trafalgar Square - completely ignored by everybody, except a Japanese tourist with a Nikon FM2, all he said was "very nice" before running off to catch up with his group

National Gallery - the two young guys at the left luggage asked me if it was a "real film" Leica. One had his own darkroom and aspired to owning any Leica, the other was interested in any film camera.

Makes a big change to the usual 2 weeks in somewhere hot without even seeing another film camera. I must have seen thousands of cameras in photogenic places in Mexico, and Egypt in the last couple of years - not one of them was a film camera, and nobody seemed to even notice mine.

Roger Hicks
07-26-2010, 00:50
I would not attribute their presence at Arles to being "real" necessarily. I think they qualify as people who choose to go to Arles, and have the resources and opportunity to do so. In my experience, they range from utterly "real," genuine, generous and sincere to opportunistic, pretentious and phony. Just like at every other photo festival.

Well, true enough. But equally, they ain't there for an equipment fair. And getting an exhibition together at Arles shows that you're pretty serious about taking pictures. It may also be that the pretentious opportunistic phonies are the least likely to be interested in equipment, because they 'know' that 'real' Fine Art photographers 'don't care about equipment'.

Critics and theoreticians such as Barthes and Sontag know nothing about photographic equipment and therefore cannot care about it. But every artist I've ever met, in every medium, wants to use the best tool for the job. Even writers want good WP programs, computers, keyboards (believe me!) Or in the days of typewriters, good ones (I used a Remington Noiseless). Or, if they're that way inclined, their favourite pen or pencil. And who, once they have heard of them, can forget Paddy Campbell's corduroy 'writing trousers'?

Because you can make art using anything -- household emulsion, a penny whistle, Picasso's famous bull made from a bicycle saddle and horns -- and because some artists choose tools that are not, at first sight, 'first class' (Holgas, for example) an awful lot of people assume that it doesn't matter what you use. But as I say, to every artist I've ever met, it matters what they, personally use. And most have considerable curiosity about others' techniques and even tools. Curiosity is part of what makes them artists.

What I found particularly interesting about reactions at Arles to the M9 is that a camera that is often dismissed as suitable only for snobs, and those with more money than sense, evoked such interest from people who clearly did care about creating images rather than playing with equipment. And as the rest of ths thread has illustrated, 'old cameras' that 'no-one cares about' do, in fact, engage the interest of all kinds of people. For that matter, John's story about the fellow at Hampton Court Palace flower show with the big camera is a fascinating observation on the relationship between photographers and their cameras.

This isn't a thread about "I've got a..." because, God knows, we have enough of those on RFF. Rather, it's a thread about "How other people react to a ..." And I don't think I'm alone in finding it interesting.

Cheers,

R.

Vince Lupo
07-26-2010, 01:14
Hassy's are pussy cats compared to the big Pentax ... I wonder if there is actually a camera with a louder shutter than the 67? :eek:

I think a Rollei SL66 would give it a run for its money!

Rob-F
07-26-2010, 02:17
My camera mostly draw comments when I am using either a Barnack, or else my Rolleiflex. Not quite so much with Leica M.

robert blu
07-26-2010, 03:01
When in Arles a gentleman, older than me, stop me and looking at my m7 said it was a real camera. After thanking him I explained that I was shooting Kodchrome and he ask me, very surprised ? "64 ? " We spoke a little about the disappearing of this film, the increasing difficulties to have e-6 developped.
robert

healyzh
07-26-2010, 15:17
I've noticed in the US as well that the Hasselblad seems to draw comments from older men. It is not a camera to carry if you want to avoid attention.

The camera I shoot with that seems to attract attention and questions from people of all ages is my Graflex Super Graphic. I've yet to really take my Horseman View Camera out in public, but I imagine the reaction would be the same.

Oddly enough my wife's Yashica 124G TLR hasn't attracted as much attention as I would have expected.

I have also been pleasantly surprised how little attention my Leica M6 draws. I was actually concerned about this prior to buying it, but so far I've only received one comment, and that was when I was changing the film.

F456
07-26-2010, 15:59
I work in a school, and comments abound. The staff comments are always banal - the Nikon D-cameras get the standard big lens innuendo while the Leicas are ignored. The pupils, on the other hand, are fascinated by the Leicas though the responses are from both ends of the spectrum. Some reckon the wind-on lever is desperately sad; most think it is really cool. Few have seen anybody focus a lens by hand - how fast yesterday becomes prehistory!

Quite a few of the pupils don't understand why I hold the camera to my face. And when I've taken some pictures, they are puzzled to see that the film cameras have no screen.

Whatever their reactions, they come away looking pleased to have made some unexpected discoveries. Some even listened long enough to learn that pure megapixels are not the be all and end all; others asked how many megapixels a roll of film was.

Cool camera, sad camera - someone here must've indoctrinated them against the 'nice' word!

Cheers,
Tom

Keith
07-26-2010, 16:07
At work last friday I was using my Zeiss Ikon ... the nineteen year old who works there was fascinated by the thing. He had no comprehension at all of how a film camera works and commented about the lever on top that makes the number in the little window change ... "What does that do?"

:p

Sjixxxy
07-26-2010, 19:14
Crown Graphic ... makes their jaws drop every time ... anywhere!

I once used a Speed Graphic to get free carnival rides out of a carnie. Free anything from a carnie just doesn't happen.

FrozenInTime
07-26-2010, 19:39
Definitely something about Hasselblads that attracts comments - normally with direct 'is that a Hasselblad'.

I wonder if it's genericized or specific recognition - anyone with a Bronica or Mamiya get asked if it's a Hasselblad ?

Muggins
07-27-2010, 05:28
I used to get most comments with my Moskva - probably because of the length of time it took to set up a shot, and its distinctive looks - but sadly it's still in dock at the mo. Come winter... I hope!

Unless I spot someone else with an out-of-the-ordinary camera, the ones that get most comment are the Box Brownies. I've got the red one loaded at the moment, with a yellow filter rubber banded across the front of it, which I suspect will draw a few looks when I get it out, though how many will twig it's actually a camera may be a different matter.

Favourite moment, though, was showing someone who regularly ribbed me about how I should go digital my 1911 Kodak Folding Pocket Brownie, and it's photos. His jaw dropped, and he just said "Wow!"

Adrian

Pico
07-27-2010, 05:42
I am very happy that it is exceedingly rare for anyone to comment upon my cameras. I take it to mean that I am unobtrusive, or perhaps boring-looking enough not to bother with. (Also, my M bodies are 100% blacked out so that they appear to be generics.)

paulfish4570
07-27-2010, 05:51
I think the Hassy gets a lot of notice because of the space program and Hassy's ads from that era ...

DHHZ
07-27-2010, 06:15
While carrying my Yashica-Mat on the New York Subway, a woman asked if I was actually using it to take pictures. Turns out she had exactly the same camera in her attic somewhere, handed down from her father. Not a young woman by any means, but I guess it's been quite a long time since TLRs were in regular use.

jsrockit
07-27-2010, 06:34
I get comments all the time when I'm using a Leica. NYC must have many Leica fans. However, many mistake my Leica digitals for film cameras.

Roger Hicks
07-27-2010, 06:51
I am very happy that it is exceedingly rare for anyone to comment upon my cameras. I take it to mean that I am unobtrusive, or perhaps boring-looking enough not to bother with. (Also, my M bodies are 100% blacked out so that they appear to be generics.)

A lot depends on what you're doing. If you're taking pictures, you're dead right that you shouldn't be noticed (though my own belief is that blacking out cameras makes them more noticeable, not less). But if you're in a gallery, and happen to have your camera with you (because you sure as hell aren't going to leave it in a hotel room), it's another matter.

As an aside, I find it intriguing that this thread was completely ignored for its first week, but now has over 2000 views.

Cheers,

R.

hteasley
07-27-2010, 08:28
I work with a bunch of young computer artists, and none of them knew what a Leica was, when I first received my M8. Cameras are made by Canon and Nikon, period. Nothing else is likely any good. Leica's probably some cheap no-name brand....

I had a huge number of people come up to me to talk cameras when I went to an antique car show in Wellesley, so I can verify the car/camera enthusiast connection. And I had an (older) barista in Starbucks swoon over the M3 around my neck, the other day.

Dave Wilkinson
07-27-2010, 10:42
I work with a bunch of young computer artists, ...pardon my ignorance - but what exactly is a computer artist? :confused:

hteasley
07-27-2010, 11:09
...pardon my ignorance - but what exactly is a computer artist? :confused:

People who spend their time using Wacom Cintiqs, Photoshop, Maya, and ZBrush to make art. I'm an Art Director for a video game company.

Dave Wilkinson
07-27-2010, 11:31
People who spend their time using Wacom Cintiqs, Photoshop, Maya, and ZBrush to make art. I'm an Art Director for a video game company. Thanks!....my computer knowledge still leaves a lot to be desired! :)