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Roger Hicks
05-27-2010, 23:52
For example, would you consider going away for a holiday/vacation without a camera? Or using disposables? Or taking just one camera, with no backup?

There's obviously a spectrum from those to whom photography is a central part of their life (to quote Geoffrey Crawley, "I can't imagine ever giving it up. Can you?") to those who drift in and out of it among other hobbies. Also, photography is by no means exclusive: as RFF members demonstrate, you can combine it with motorcycling, history, travel, all kinds of things.

There's no moral judgement in this. Clearly photography is more important to Geoffrey (and to me) than to many people, not least because it accounts for a substantial part of our living. But how important is it to you? And how would you define/recognize 'important'?

Cheers,

R.

lorenzo1910
05-28-2010, 00:03
For me photography is a part of my life.
I couldn't even imagine to have holidays without at least one camera (usually I carry one film/one digital camera)...
Sometimes when I am too busy I feel the urgence to go taking some pictures...doesn't matter where and what...I just want to feel the magic of the creation of a photo...

isorgb
05-28-2010, 00:09
Important, even very important...
but for example- if I will not have a camera on vacation, I will not cry. I will be happy, I will not be watching the world by frame, exposure etc ;)
I really like pictures, but sometimes I do not take pictures for a long time, despite the fact I have digital camera.
I'm just hobbyist and photography is important without "clutch up".

Arjay
05-28-2010, 00:29
> would you consider going away for a holiday/vacation without a camera?

No.

> Or using disposables?

No; the last disposable I had was lieing around in the trunk of my car for an undefined time. I don't think I could have relied on the quality of the film in that thing. And I'm not even speculating on the limited technical possibilities that this camera could have offered.

> Or taking just one camera, with no backup?

Hm - that's a question of how professionally I would like to operate, and a balance between safety and convenience.

I tend to take my digital gear (DSLR) on vacations because I really can't plan on how much I would be shooting. Cost-wise, digital is a safer bet here.

But - I might carry a film camera for some limited street shooting.

> But how important is it to you? And how would you define/recognize 'important'?

Well, speaking of a holiday, I will not be on my own for most of the time, and therefore I am also considering the wishes/needs/interests of my significant other. So, I might not have a large choice of gear with me all the time, but rather find an agreement about going out on my own for a temporary photo walk, and that would be the time that I would devote entirely on photography. Other times, I'm likely to compromise ...

nathanp
05-28-2010, 00:55
Snapshot type photography is quite important to me. I want to be sure that when my son grows up he can see pictures from all stages of his life and when I get old(er) I want to be able to look back at the photos of my life. For these photos I'm not very fussy about the equipment - I have photos taken with disposables and 110 novelty cameras that are perfectly capable of taking me back to the time when they were taken and they mean a lot to me. Anything I use these days is streets ahead of those cameras. I'd class these photos as important as I would be quite miserable if I couldn't take any photographs on a family holiday/event.

For my own photography, the stuff I do for my own amusement that I mentally class as "proper" or "arty" isn't hugely important. I get a lot of pleasure from it but I don't carry a camera everywhere and I don't take photographs every day. I swing between photography, guitar playing, guitar restoring and making electronic music - photography is just one of the things I drift in and out of. I have had more praise for my photography than for my guitar playing or music making which makes me think I should do more.

I can't imagine not ever taking photographs again. Video just isn't the same.

kuvvy
05-28-2010, 01:34
I carry a camera daily, usually a compact, just in case I come across something worth shooting plus I have a young grandson who's always worth the odd snap. When on holiday I'll take a compact and a 'serious shooter' like my RD1. I have gone away in the past with only a small Yashica T5 and actually shot more films than I had when carrying more gear. May be a lesson to be learnt there.
I wouldn't think of going on holiday without a camera even if only to capture those happy snaps that prove 'I was there'. I'm off on a Norwegian cruise in three weeks time and I'm planning on taking my RD1, G11 and GRDIII.

john neal
05-28-2010, 01:44
Like Kuvvy, I don't go anywhere without a camera (generally a Leica 1), and would never go on holiday without a decent camera. The choice will change depending on where and how long - Florence would be the MP + 35mm Summicron, while Kenya would be the R8 + long lenses and, yes, I do sometimes go with only one camera.

Photography is important enough to me that I have been doing it for the past 51 years :)

Leigh Youdale
05-28-2010, 01:52
Pretty important, as a hobby. I have two others - flying gliders (real ones) and playing music with a couple of bands twice or thrice a week. Photography consumes the most time though. Not always productive time but always enjoyable.
I would not go on holidays or even a day trip without a camera, although I don't take one down to the shops every time I go out. I've made some attempts to reduce the size and weight of my gear as I find the larger and heavier it is the less inclined I am to take it with me. So the Nikkormat (used for macro and telephoto - 85/135/200) stays at home and also the Rolleiflex. I usually take the two Bessas, each loaded with a different film and lens.
I wouldn't use a disposable - I have a Canon IXUS digital that would cover that need if it ever arose but my wife usually has that.
I'd thought about trading the two Bessas for one M6 but currently I've concluded that much as the idea of an M6 has emotional appeal, the Bessas give me two bodies with overlapping viewfinder frames (I use a 25mm lens quite often, preferring it to a 28 and I don't use longer than 75mm on the RF's) so I've got backup as well in case one breaks down. And they really do everything that the M6 will do, if not with quite the same "feel" or pride of ownership. And they're newer.
I haven't quite decided what role the GF1 has. I prefer working with film but see the GF1 as something like a different design of hammer when the one I like to use isn't quite what's needed for the job at hand. It does have its uses occasionally. Bloody expensive hammer though!

ReeRay
05-28-2010, 01:57
Eat sleep and drink it. Much more important than life and death.

johannielscom
05-28-2010, 02:48
I am watching the world 'by frame and exposure' and actually get grumpy when denied photographing when I want to, which is most always :o

No holiday is ever enjoyed without several cameras in my bag, and when I leave it at home to please wife and kids on some odd days, I always feel relieved to bring it along next day.

When shooting street, one of the most valued 'extras' is the opportunity to be an observer solely, not a participant. For some strange reason, I like being alone in the presence of others.

Interesting question Roger, got me some nice quotes for the signature.

xxloverxx
05-28-2010, 03:07
‘For example, would you consider going away for a holiday/vacation without a camera? Or using disposables? Or taking just one camera, with no backup?’
My Rollei 35 came in the post today. I now have next to no excuse not to take a camera everywhere with me. It's also a good film backup camera.
Even if I forgot the Rollei, I probably wouldn't forget the iPhone.

I hardly go anywhere without a camera, and if it isn't in my hands, it's a few steps away (think: swimming pools).

It's not that I'm completely obsessed with making photos every minute, but I like the “secure” feeling of having a camera there in case I need it.

I have, in the past, taken 1 camera without backup on vacation; now I realise what a stupid decision that was (in Vancouver (and in Whistler), winter, snow, rain…). Luckily, I had no problems (nothing failed), but I'm not trying my luck again.

Photography is very important to me, both as art and as a way of recording history. They say a picture paints a thousand words…and, honestly, I hate writing. Ergo, this post ends here (I hate writing even more)

xxloverxx
05-28-2010, 03:08
I am watching the world 'by frame and exposure' and actually get grumpy when denied photographing when I want to, which is most always :o

No holiday is ever enjoyed without several cameras in my bag, and when I leave it at home to please wife and kids on some odd days, I always feel relieved to bring it along next day.

When shooting street, one of the most valued 'extras' is the opportunity to be an observer solely, not a participant. For some strange reason, I like being alone in the presence of others.

Interesting question Roger, got me some nice quotes for the signature.

Regarding your 1st & 3rd points, you're not alone.

Your 2nd point however…
I'd never leave a camera at home just to please someone.

andreios
05-28-2010, 03:14
Holiday or even a small family trip without a camera? Impossible. having quite a big car, I usually carryalmost all of my cameras (I haven't acquired many of them yet, but it begins to grow) - seeing all the stuff we need to carry for our son I always say - those few cameras won't matter at all. But I do the actual shooting only with one or two of them - always deciding on the spot which to take with me.

isorgb
05-28-2010, 03:21
Holidays without a camera is possible for me only?!?!? ;)

petronius
05-28-2010, 03:23
I have many interests (beside the work for living) but if I could afford only one, it would definitely be photography!

Vacation without a camera?
I´ve never done this for more than 30 years. My wife and son are shooting too, so vacations are always photo trips (lucky me!)

Disposables?
Any camera is better than no camera!

No backup?
I´ve done this, but the fact that most of my cameras are old, it doesn´t make me happy. Better have a backup and don´t need it, than ...

Edit: isorgb, how does it feel to be alone;-)

johannielscom
05-28-2010, 03:29
Regarding your 1st & 3rd points, you're not alone.

Your 2nd point however…
I'd never leave a camera at home just to please someone.

Trouble is, when I bring it on a daytrip while being on a holiday, there's lots to see and shoot, so I tend to shoot at least two rolls a day. Not only some tourist snaps but also street stuff etc. which needs a permanent photography-driven attention to your surroundings.

I'm not much fun being around when 'working the streets' and leaving the camera at home keeps me from going grumpy. Next day, I don't take no lip from nobody, since I did their thing the day before :D

isorgb
05-28-2010, 03:38
petronius:
Fantastic! Then I am free from search of the light, composition, focal lenght. I don't scream then "Where is my camera??? Where is my camera???"....
I can only focus on the drinking of beer or watching beautiful girls. Just relax :D

Brian Sweeney
05-28-2010, 03:40
I do it for enjoyment and self-fulfillment. I've been taking pictures since I was 6.

Nikki has a two-year head-start, using a Nikon and Leica since she was 4. I'm sure she will outlive me.

Pickett Wilson
05-28-2010, 03:42
Can't think of many days (unless I was sick in bed) that I've haven't had a camera in my hand in the last 50 years. I was hooked at 10 years old and it won't let go! ;) Definitely have other interests, but photography has been my passion, and career, for most of my life. I tend to be an observer, and a camera has opened doors for observation that would have been closed to me without it. "Oh, him? Ignore him, he's always got that camera." :)

Good question.

petronius
05-28-2010, 03:51
petronius:
Fantastic! Then I am free from search of the light, composition, focal lenght. I don't scream then "Where is my camera??? Where is my camera???"....
I can only focus on the drinking of beer or watching beautiful girls. Just relax :D

Then you live in paradise! Even with a P&S I only have one hand and one eye for beer and girls!

oftheherd
05-28-2010, 03:58
There was a time when photography was as to live and breath. Life has gotten in the way. Part of it was the area where I live and commute to work. Part of it was a house fire some 18 years ago. Losing some of my photo gear, worse, my negatives and slides being damaged, took a lot of pleasure out of it for me some how.

Modern digital has taken its toll too. So many people today, even those who have an extra lens or two, are not beyond snapshooting. They don't know about f/stops or exposure control. Development is what you do when the run down area is razed and new projects are built. What do you say after hello?

I do keep a camera around most of the time. It may be a digital P&S, a Canonet or XA, or an SLR. It may stay in my car as I can't bring a camera to my work. When possible, I do take photos. I still watch for photo ops, but driving at 75 mph on highway 95 is not condusive to phtography. Nor is Washington DC traffic.

On vacation, I will have some 35mm, probably an SLR along with a small RF. I may have a MF folder or the Super Press 23, and maybe even a 9x12 for LF. Vacations can be much more relaxed, or not. "I don't want to sit in the car while you take a picture there." "If you need that camera why did you leave it in the car?" Sigh.

:D

johannielscom
05-28-2010, 04:03
Interesting Post count JSU: 4,294,967,284.

What does that make your average on say, today?

:D:D

jsrockit
05-28-2010, 04:16
Right now, it is extremely important and a camera goes with me most of the time. However, I just came off of 10 years without bothering with photography. I got burnt out after 10 years prior of bringing a camera everywhere. I guess I'm the type to go crazy, then feel the need to reset.

craygc
05-28-2010, 04:17
Live it, love it, breathe it...

My wife, kids and family and being able to support them are number one, but photography is who I am, what centers me, and what I escape to. For me, I photograph Asia - end of story - so in terms of holidays it depends on where I'm going as whether I even bother with a camera. I don't use disposables but I will use a phone cam in a pinch. When I do shoot, I always carry at least 2 cameras - not necessarily the same type...

Juan Valdenebro
05-28-2010, 04:26
For me it's more important than any other activity... I know I will do it until I die... It's become, slowly and without my intention, something I need if I want peace of mind... I can't even imagine my life without shooting... Just like my body needs air and water, my soul needs to photograph... The intense pleasure it gives me is deep and complete time after time. An adventure, a dream and a mystery...

Cheers.

Juan

hipsterdufus
05-28-2010, 04:46
For me it's more important than any other activity... I know I will do it until I die... It's become, slowly and without my intention, something I need if I want peace of mind... I can't even imagine my life without shooting... Just like my body needs air and water, my soul needs to photograph... The intense pleasure it gives me is deep and complete time after time. An adventure, a dream and a mystery...

Cheers.

Juan

This is pretty much how I feel. In an existential way, this is the thing that I have found that gives my life meaning. Once I got to the point where I didn't care what other people thought of my photography, I got infinitely more excited about my work. The "meaning" of my life may change from photography one day, but I doubt it. I get more excited about it the older I get. :D

rover
05-28-2010, 04:47
I do it for enjoyment and self-fulfillment. I've been taking pictures since I was 6.



I don''t think any other statement here is closer to my thoughts. I simply enjoy photography. That being the case, it is part of what I do. I look at it as though I can photograph my life as I live it instead of photographing my life stepping back as others live it.

sig
05-28-2010, 04:53
for me there are a lot of other things that is more important than photography.,,,, Wife, kids and making them not starving and even better happy is way more important than any photographic adventure. If it is your job then it is very important (as in it is your bread winner) if it is a hobby most people can drop it within 1 second for real life.

On the other side... as long as it make me happy, and it does, why change it.

My 2 cent is that if you ask the question you have not been in a situation where you had to make a choice (and I have never been there), and in that situation everybody would drop or cameras and fix it for our loved ones.

Charlie Lemay
05-28-2010, 05:05
When I fill out a form that asks my religion, I always write in Photography.

Ezzie
05-28-2010, 05:15
I´m contemplating giving up at least two other hobbies to get more time for photography. Do I carry a camera most of the time? Yes. Better to have a camera and say "no, I don´t feel like it", than not have a camera and think "blast, if only I had a camera!"

Ezzie
05-28-2010, 05:16
It's an average of one post every second, 24/7, for the last 168 years. Which suggests I was interested in rangefinders before there were rangefinders.

No wonder "Life is too short"

funkpilz
05-28-2010, 05:42
It's a part of my life, and I always have a camera with me. I'm passionate about it, but that doesn't mean I'm good at it. I just spend a lot of time trying.

wgerrard
05-28-2010, 07:39
It’s a hobby. If and when I ever feel that photography is complicating my life, I’ll box things up. I.e., if I find myself worrying and fretting about it, then it is not serving its purpose.

More often than not, photography is an excuse to go somewhere new and take pictures. I enjoy minimal planning, semi-random walkabouts, with one camera and 2-3 lenses. If I drape the bag over my shoulder and decide it is too heavy, I’ll gladly take something out. I’d rather miss a shot or two than be uncomfortable all day or come home with a sore shoulder.

It’s funny, but I don’t bring a camera along when I visit out-of-town family and friends.

So... I doubt I’d go on vacation without a camera. I’ve never used a disposable, but I would if I had no other choice. Sometimes I take a little digital as a backup. I don't routinely carry a camera with me during the day. As I've said before, I really dislike carrying stuff. Don't even carry a phone.

How important is it? Shooting locally, and on a day-to-day basis, not that important. (I’m trying to break out of a bit of an “I can’t find anything to shoot!” funk.) Travel is often centered on the photography, perhaps too much.

Brian Sweeney
05-28-2010, 08:06
There are some things that are important to me that are not important to many other people. There are some things that I am an expert on, that a lot of people have never heard of or could not care less about. I am an expert on FORTRAN to the point of disassembling a compiler, finding the mistake in it, and correcting it. That goes beyond most FORTRAN programmers level of expertise.

But if something is important to someone else, and it is important to me- than I have found a friend to share it with. That is basically what RFF is about, a type of photography that most people have not heard of and that even more people do not care about. It is important enough to the members of this forum to join-up, learn about it, and to share experiences.

oftheherd
05-28-2010, 08:13
There are some things that are important to me that are not important to many other people. There are some things that I am an expert on, that a lot of people have never heard of or could not care less about. I am an expert on FORTRAN to the point of disassembling a compiler, finding the mistake in it, and correcting it. That goes beyond most FORTRAN programmers level of expertise.

But if something is important to someone else, and it is important to me- than I have found a friend to share it with. That is basically what RFF is about, a type of photography that most people have not heard of and that even more people do not care about. It is important enough to the members of this forum to join-up, learn about it, and to share experiences.

That's pretty much why I am at RFF (except that I am not a FORTRAN programmer :D).

Roger Hicks
05-28-2010, 08:33
for me there are a lot of other things that is more important than photography.,,,, Wife, kids and making them not starving and even better happy is way more important than any photographic adventure. If it is your job then it is very important (as in it is your bread winner) if it is a hobby most people can drop it within 1 second for real life.

On the other side... as long as it make me happy, and it does, why change it.

My 2 cent is that if you ask the question you have not been in a situation where you had to make a choice (and I have never been there), and in that situation everybody would drop or cameras and fix it for our loved ones.

Well, I've not been there either, but then, it would be a meaningless choice for me as photography has been an essential part of my earning a living for the last 30+ years.

On the other hand, I know more than one photographer who has decided that photography is more important than relationships. Not consciously, in many cases, but actions speak louder than words.

Obviousy there's scope for willy-waving and boasting: "Photography is more important to me than to you, therefore I'm a better photographer/ human being/ artist/ whatever." There is of course no correlation between the two. What intrigues me is how many people take the same view as I do: photography is central, not peripheral. In other words, it's not an option: they (and I) I pretty much have to do it. I have immense difficulty in imagining life without it (though not as much as I have in imagining life without Frances).

Cheers,

R.

Peter Wijninga
05-28-2010, 09:05
'Central' apart from making a living doing something completely different. 'Photography' includes spending many hours in the digital darkroom sorting through thousands of photos and trying to preserve/create something worthwhile. This said, if I'd be a 'professional photographer' (in the sense of making a living), I am sure I would have an equally absorbing interest in something completely different.

KenR
05-28-2010, 09:08
A few years ago my Bronica 645 died on the first day of a hiking vacation in Rocky Mountain National Park. I had no backup. Despite great hikes and great scenery (or becasue of this), I was misreable, cranky and a poor companion. I MUST have a camera with me to be happy.

Roger Hicks
05-28-2010, 09:21
'Central' apart from making a living doing something completely different. 'Photography' includes spending many hours in the digital darkroom sorting through thousands of photos and trying to preserve/create something worthwhile. This said, if I'd be a 'professional photographer' (in the sense of making a living), I am sure I would have an equally absorbing interest in something completely different.
Dear Peter,

Surprisingly many of the best professional photographers I know are, in fact, obsessed with photography and have relatively few 'hobbies', though many are also fond of fast cars or motorcycles or good food.

Cheers,

R.

Lilserenity
05-28-2010, 09:34
Massively important, I go few places without my M2. Simple as that really!

Phil_F_NM
05-28-2010, 09:54
Pretty much my reason for being

Peter Wijninga
05-28-2010, 11:36
Dear Roger, 'good food' would be an interesting starting point.

robbeiflex
05-28-2010, 11:50
Perhaps I'm in the minority, but its just a hobby and my camera has to play second fiddle to my bicycle (second among hobbies, that is, only after family, friends, career, etc.). That said, I don't think I could go on vacation without a camera. Photography is what I do to unwind but I also enjoy documenting where we've been, whereas most but not all of my vacations do not involve cycling.

Roger Hicks
05-28-2010, 12:04
Perhaps I'm in the minority, but its just a hobby and my camera has to play second fiddle to my bicycle (second among hobbies, that is, only after family, friends, career, etc.). That said, I don't think I could go on vacation without a camera. Photography is what I do to unwind but I also enjoy documenting where we've been, whereas most but not all of my vacations do not involve cycling.

Whereas I'm the opposite. I have quite a good bicycle (Overbury's) but if it were stolen tomorrow (which God forbid) then I doubt I'd even bother to replace it. Bicycling is more important to you; photography to me.

Cheers,

R.

FrankS
05-28-2010, 12:07
Photography is not just a hobby for me. It's more important than that.

jan normandale
05-28-2010, 12:12
Roger, I have a lot of $$ sunk into film equipment (and a few in one pocket Panasonic digi) which I could probably walk away from in a moment. Photography is only one means of expression so I could live without it. I’d miss it but I could let it go.

Would I take a camera with me when I walk out a door? Yes because I’m always looking and thinking about images, but there are other ways to deliver a message than through a film or digital camera.

To the point there's no chest beating if I can’t shoot. OTOH I would be saddened.

BTW: What no “poll”!?
;D

silip
05-29-2010, 04:38
It makes my life a bit better.

Steve_F
05-29-2010, 07:38
I'm currently on 'holiday' with the family and have my M6 TTL & D200 with me. B&W film in the Leica and the D200 for colour. As I only want snaps in colour I'm now looking at a Panasonic LX3 or Nikon P6000 for colour (RAW is a must). I want it all to fit in my Billingham Hadley as I love my photography and am fed-up with carrying SLR's around. It gets monotonous after this time. Buying the Leica was great. I love the idea of a second M body for colour slide. Reckon two M's and a RAW Digi compact in the shoulder bag is the way for me. Also I've got a great little Manfrotto 709B that works a treat with the Leica.

Steve.

Lauffray
05-29-2010, 08:10
Would you consider going away for a holiday/vacation without a camera?I have my camera on me even while doing groceries, I don't think I can leave my cameras at home while on vacation. I like to think that my cameras are happy when they snap often :)
Or using disposables?Disposables...well, having a camera is better than no camera.
Or taking just one camera, with no backup?The backup idea has been getting very tempting recently, even though up until now I'd been shooting with only one body/lens combo.

maggieo
05-29-2010, 08:15
I walked away from it for four years- I had gotten burnt out. But it snuck back into my life and now I do it every day, only not for pay.

It's less important, but way more fun, now.

telemetre
05-29-2010, 08:39
Photography is a major part of my life, I always have my camera with me, even if I don't shoot a single frame for days. I never go on vacation without my camera, I can't even imagine how that would feel. I've always had a single camera and a single lens but luckily my girlfriend brings one of her SLRs along with a digital compact, so backup is available at no extra weight.

Looking back, if I weren't interested in photography my life would have been radically different, the comfort of my home darkroom is a very stabilizing factor for me (and attracts a good number of friends). Who says obsessions are harmful?

PS: Incidentally I also program in fortran (and used to program in FORTRAN), but my compiler is written in C, and wouldn't/couldn't touch it...

koniczech
05-29-2010, 08:52
First, it's necessary.

I need to take photos of sites for my arch. projects, so without photography, I would have to sketch every perspective (forget that!) But that type of photography is almost purely utilitarian. I'm not going in for macro shots of a bug walking around on a brick wall while at a site. For that reason, digital p&s' are great.

Next, it's something to do.

Unfortunately (and the contrary), I was born/grew up in a digital environment, meaning I was lucky enough to meet one other person who appreciates film at college last year. Otherwise, all my other friends ask me (probably every time I have my GNS or Petri 7s) why I don't just use digital like everyone else. This is unfortunate because it makes me rethink bringing my film cameras, which are infinitely more fun to shoot, to interesting places (boardwalks,Boston,NYC,etc.) that I am going with my other people.

So, yes, I do occasionally consider leaving home without my camera (because I hate carrying around my Canon Powershot p&s...)

koniczech

Roger Hicks
05-29-2010, 08:52
Looking back, if I weren't interested in photography my life would have been radically different, the comfort of my home darkroom is a very stabilizing factor for me (and attracts a good number of friends). Who says obsessions are harmful?


Same here!

Cheers,

R.

robert blu
05-29-2010, 08:59
For me photography is very imprtant: my life based on family, work and photography. Trying to balance the three (since a few month I'm retired so it's easier). But I have to say that when I say photography i do not mean only taking and printing pictures. As a serious hobby (or passion) it involves reading books about, visiting exhibithions, sometimes travel to visit an exhibitions, meeting with friends, preparing some lectures for the local schools or my photoclub. It's a way of life and i'm luck enough that my wife likes photography as well. Getting old I' try to travel light but never go to a holiday (even a week end) without a camera (it is 2, one for me and one for my wife, each of us is the back up for the other!)
robert

sfaust
06-14-2010, 19:04
Lots of interesting stories and ideas posted here. A good read for sure.

>> would you consider going away for a holiday/vacation without a camera?

No. But with that said, I would leave my high end gear at home in favor of bringing something more light and compact. As long as I can get decent images, and have reasonable control over the process, I'm willing to make that compromise.

>> Or using disposables?

Definitely not.

>> Or taking just one camera, with no backup?

For personal photography, vacations, etc, I would. I could always purchase a new camera, even if its just a P&S, should something happen to mine. But for work (I shoot commercially) its not an option since a failure could easily open me up to flying everyone back out for the reshoot, and absorbing all the costs which could be substantial.

I do like how I can intertwine photography and various other aspects of my life. From family gatherings, vacations, to even shooting macro images with a P&S in the car while waiting for my wife shopping. Photography has allowed me to document my other hobbies in great detail. I'm a very visual person, and photography does seen to creep into my life in all sorts of way.

My personal photography does drift in and out, and always has. Like the cobblers kids that have no shoes. For the last 15 years mainly because I constantly shoot for work. Before that, starting up a business. Before that, growing a family. Before that girls and cars. Before that, high school drama. Before that, I needed to learn to read and write, and start teething :)

But, I've been persistent at it for the vast majority of my life in various incarnations. There is always something that brings me back when I drift away. Sometimes is new gear, a new format introduced, a technique that as caught my attention, or a concept of subject matter that I want to document. It comes in waves, but is ever present. I don't think I have ever been without at least a few cameras at my disposal, and the longest timespan between shooting and not is typically measured in weeks, and rarely months.

I'm lucky in that I can afford to indulge most of my interests. But if I had to choose only one, it would be photography. While other hobbies come and go, photography has a timeless endurance for me, and a long history to fuel that.

varjag
06-15-2010, 01:47
For me it's like smoking: I do it every day but I could quit anytime ;)

rbiemer
06-15-2010, 07:57
Photography is a hobby for me but that does not mean it's some lesser way of spending my time. I don't think I would be as good a chef if I did not have something creative that is only for myself.
I'm obviously not pursuing this hobby in a vacuum and I do enjoy the notice of other people but ultimately I don't have to answer to anyone else about what I do with this hobby.
As well, there is (are?) enough different aspects of "photography" that I figure I can spend the rest of my life learning it and never be done.
I don't use my cameras every day but I rarely am without one and the days I don't enjoy some part of this hobby are very few and far between.
A camera on vacation? Absolutely. One camera on vacation? Depends on what and where. Disposable? Yes. Sometimes they are the better choice for me. In fact, I have a Konica Wai Wai sitting on the table next to me right now. Though I won't be disposing of that one, I'll be reloading it with a new battery and in date film once I've shot the roll that's in it.
Rob

Frontman
06-17-2010, 05:24
For me it began as a hobby. I grew up reading second-hand National Geographic magazines, the ones with the big Canon advertisements inside. I naturally associated the exotic images and faraway places in the magazines with cameras. I decided I would love to visit all the places I saw, and hopefully take my own pictures while I was there.

Unfortunately, my life took a few different turns, and photography never progressed past a basic hobby. I always kept a camera around of some sort, and used it when I could, but my list of hobbies and part time activities was so long that I didn't actually get to use my cameras very much.

My interest in photography became full-fledged when I moved to Japan. With so many new things to see in a beautiful and scenic country, I gave my cameras a workout. With the huge numbers of photographers in Japan, and the many shops that deal with them, I began to take an interest in the equipment as well.

My photography has evolved from what was a sometime-hobby to a fairly good source of income. I don't earn as much with photography as I do with my regular job, but in recent months the extra money has come in quite handy. I am slowly picking up the pace of my business, and though I don't ever expect to be into photography full-time, I am enjoying what I am doing.

Instantclassic
06-17-2010, 06:57
The urge to bring magic analog machine gets stronger as years passes by. The stillness while developing my magic negatives and the anticipation to scan them is something wonderful. Under the surface of live and streaming events outside some surgical and highly subjective samples can be made. Only with the symbiotic relation between the tool and the tools tool N.B.
One camera, one lens and Tri-X. Sure. M2, Summilux 35mm pre-asph to be specific.

Super Angulon and Summicron pre-asph 90mm if strong and eager and another camera body or two to become superman..:o

dee
06-24-2010, 23:00
I am ever surprised , given this age of tiny portable Digi-boxes , how many people go to shows / fairs etc without a camera in sight .
I am still agonising over a pocket Digi-box , given the size of my M8 which presently travels with me .... or the big box Dig 3 with it's oversize lens .
It would be unthinkable to holiday without a camera .

mark-b
06-24-2010, 23:23
It wouldn't be a vacation without my camera coming along. I will even use a disposable for a backup, which filled in nicely for me last year, when I was a long way from home.

I'm as dedicated to photography as others are with sports or music or painting, and I take it seriously. Calling it a hobby is insulting.

Bike Tourist
06-25-2010, 03:39
For the first ten years of my working life I was a commercial artist. Then, I changed fields. Then, I discovered that photography was easier than drawing and painting. Then, I started to sell my photos to add to my income part time.

Now, I'm retired and free to bicycle all day long if I want to . . . except photography keeps cutting into my bike time and I'm powerless to stop it!

jbielikowski
06-25-2010, 03:54
Sometimes I feel that I have no life beyond photography.

NathanJD
06-25-2010, 04:13
Months go by in my life where i feel that there is nothing worth photographing but when it comes to holidays, events, occasions then i HAVE to have my camera.

could you imagine whitnessing something spectacular and not having your camera there to record it for later perusal?

hmmm... that would haunt me.

I watched a documentory recently about Robert Doisneau and at one stage in his life he was in the street and this woman appeared and to him, everything about this woman, this vision, the scene was right - it was the most beautiful thing he had ever seen and guess what? he didn't have his camera with him. for along time after this he obsessed - trying to find the woman and it haunted him. he never did see her again. i think this is a story that many photogrpahers can relate to; and indeed is a real fear that many of us experience!

Fred R.
06-25-2010, 14:50
Last time I contemplated the (possible) end of film, I said to myself I'll just go where I go, look for the moments I do, align myself, and then. . . point, when the moment arrives. Then point again. Then again. I could do that now, but photographing is about bringing home the moment, isn't t?

whitecat
06-25-2010, 14:56
For me it is an everyday matter. At 62 I have had an affair for over 50 yrs. I do not do digital.

Bob Ross
06-26-2010, 18:52
This has been a fun thread to read and thanks to all for sharing. When I look back at my working career in a high stress non-creative job environment, I think I can say that photography might be responsible for preserving what little sanity that I imagine I have. Retirement has has eliminated the high stress and it was replaced by the "digital era turmoil" and the balance has shifed. My hobbies include a lot of the creative type beause of the lack of creativity in the rest of my life. My current first hobby is being retired and within that is photography, which as others have mentioned includes the whole subject. On the personal angle, I like the psychology of photography/image making, the cognitive and sensory perceptions that I choose to use and not use.
So, it has been and still is important to me, and fun, too.
Bob

Carterofmars
06-27-2010, 07:14
Very.

The idea the you can capture a moment that otherwise would be lost in time, never to exist again, is nothing short of amazing.

And the photographer can make this decision; what is to be immortalized on paper (or digital). You have the ability to make that thing last forever.

It's breathtaking.

amateriat
06-29-2010, 22:00
I'd say photography has been of very high importance to me for the better part of forty years. I can't say I never leave home without a camera, but it's a rare day that I do. On those rare occasions when I've taken a real vacation–be it a simple long weekend or the week-plus variety–at least one camera comes with me, usually more, and there are no arguments about it. (Of course, I've never had a partner who bristled at this.)

Disposable/"single-use?" No way...a simple AF p/s camera, yes (I took some great photos while in France in 1992, armed with nothing more than a Nikon AF35), but nothing below that, and hardly any need to settle for less.

Add, together with biking/history/travel/etc.? But of course: photography, like black, goes with damn near everything.


- Barrett

Turtle
06-30-2010, 02:06
Its how I make sense of the world and my feelings towards it. I cannot stop and would never expect anyone to ask me to do so.

It is something I do have to manage because it is so important to me, from two perspectives. I have to ensure that the rest of my life continues, but I also have to ensure that the rest of my life allows the photography to continue. Its a perpetual balancing act which I am not sure I will ever feel runs perfectly. Its a constant state of compromise. Right now things are weighted very heavily in the direction of photography, but if certain things don't work out I will have to swing back the other way.

Harry S.
06-30-2010, 02:54
I could stop easily.

I came into photography maybe 10 years ago as an alternate to my drawing/painting passion. It was always good at the time to be able to create something instantly, without slaving away for hours on a drawing. Then photography became more important to me, I became too lazy to make traditional art, and my skills that I valued so highly in that area regressed and withered.

Now that I cant draw or paint to the level of any personal value, I regret ever picking up a camera. Also, in the last couple of years photography has become boring itself, probably because I never achieved a skill level that pleased my perfectionist streak. I'm not good enough and unfortunately nine times out of ten the act of using a camera is a waste of time.

So I only take pictures occasionally now cause I have all this gear and nothing better to do. I think I could go on some extravagant holiday and not take a camera just as a statement to my old photo buddies that a holiday can still exist without images to prove it.

I still love to look at good photos, so that side of it is still important to me. At this stage id prefer to curate photography rather than "do" photography.

Sorry to be the one negative person in this thread.

Roger Hicks
06-30-2010, 03:07
Dear Harry,

Don't apologize! It's very interesting to hear other points of view, though I have to say I'm closer to Turtle. The big difference to me is that writing is an equally essential part of what I do/what I am.

I have my reservations, though, about becoming a curator without continuing as a photographer. For me, it comes parlous close to 'Those who can, do...'

Cheers,

R.

Vics
06-30-2010, 03:11
I wouldn't think of traveling without a camera, but I have often traveled with only one. Leaves more room for film!
Vic

Harry S.
06-30-2010, 03:54
I have my reservations, though, about becoming a curator without continuing as a photographer. For me, it comes parlous close to 'Those who can, do...'


Yes, I will attest to that in myself personally. Im not happy with my own work so Id prefer to concentrate on others'. Whether a person can be a credible critic without a solid body of work to support them is another question altogether.

wlewisiii
06-30-2010, 04:34
Roger,

You always seem to find an interesting question to ask... :angel:

I dislike even going to the grocery store without a camera. I couldn't imagine not having a camera along when on vacation. OTOH, I am not a professional and do not have to bring back images to put food on the table anymore than my annual deer hunt has to.

My toys are very much a part of who I am though (http://picasaweb.google.com/wlewisiii/Toys?feat=directlink) :cool: and any vacation I'll have my IIIf along and more than half the enjoyment of the vacation would be the photography.

William

Turtle
06-30-2010, 04:41
Harry, this might sound obvious, but what have you done to get over your perceived shortcomings? What could you to to get results that are fulfilling? If you were a better photographer would you feel happier?

Its very sad to hear of someone who has given up, or so it seems, when in actual fact the passion you have for looking at the medium is the greatest pre-requisite for being good at it. lots of people think about processes but lack passion. That won't get you far. Learning the technique side is so much easier when it is a means to living out that passion. I see no obvious reason why you could not improve dramatically and produce results that you would really enjoy, assuming you have the will to do so. Everyone goes through fallow periods of reflection. Maybe a rest is what you need followed by a plan for get more out of something that seems to be haunting you from afar.

holdtheframe
06-30-2010, 07:49
Photography has always been important to me. I have realized that it's the way I experience the world. Sometimes I do wonder if I would be "participating" in what's happening around me more if I would put down the camera but my inclination has always been to pick up the camera and find the moments inside that flow through the viewfinder.

I can't pinpoint when or why this instinct developed in me but I got to say it's grown more after purchasing a M6 last year. When me and my wife were planning a trip to visit her family in Korea, more than anything, I was excited to be taking my Leica abroad and capturing more images of another culture (don't tell my wife or her family I said that).

mangie
07-04-2010, 10:43
Photography is very important to me, but as has been said above, we sometimes need to put the camera down in order to really experience what is going on around us - I eventually did this when photographing whales in Antarctica.
What I was seeing was "awesome" and the ability to record that experience wouldn't have been possible without my camera, but I also needed to "see" with my "eyes".
I "kick myself" when I go out without the camera because there is then always the "shot" one would liked to have taken!

mangie

Fawley
07-04-2010, 11:50
[quoteOnce I got to the point where I didn't care what other people thought of my photography, I got infinitely more excited about my work. [/quote]

An interesting comment I can identify with. I've drifted in and out of photography since high school ( although even in the out periods I would never have considered going on holiday without a quality camera in tow). I gave it up for a while after a period of "serious photography" because I concluded that if I didn't go into it as a career, I was wasting my time. Now I see how wrong I was. Even if all my pictures just wind up in a box I will still go on taking more.

Its been something of an obsession now for the past three years and I feel like it will stay that way. It started out as something that I could do in the small slots of time that I had available. Now I've gotten to the point where if I don't go out to do some shooting or darkroom work at least once every week or two, I feel like I'll start to develop a nervous twitch or something. I wish I had more time for it, but right now I just don't.