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Leigh Youdale
05-17-2010, 02:23
IMO it seems that too often when people use the IMHO cliche they are either linguistically lazy, keyboard challenged or - most often - not being humble at all and have just 'dumped' on another poster, but are trying to make the bile more palatable.
What, in your opinion, does IMHO really convey?

Leon Noel
05-17-2010, 02:27
IMHO (:D) i think the H could also mean 'honest', and being honest doesn't necessarily mean being 'humble'.

funkpilz
05-17-2010, 02:34
In my case, IMO conveys that what I have just stated is my individual opinion, I use the abbreviation to make clear that what I'm saying is not a fact, but rather subjective. I don't use IMHO because I think the H is simply an unneccessary letter.

Nikon Bob
05-17-2010, 02:41
In my case, IMO conveys that what I have just stated is my individual opinion, I use the abbreviation to make clear that what I'm saying is not a fact, but rather subjective. I don't use IMHO because I think the H is simply an unneccessary letter.

Same here.

Bob

mabelsound
05-17-2010, 02:44
It's just internet jargon, and we're on the internet. Nothing to get worked up about.

Roger Hicks
05-17-2010, 02:46
Sir Terry Pratchett sums this one up beautifully in a footnote on page 146 of The Truth (a novel about newspaper publishing on the Discworld): "And something that distinguishes the Mr. Windlings of this world is the term 'in my humble opinion', which they think adds weight to their statements rather than indicating, in reality, 'these are the mean little views of someone with the social graces of duckweed'."

One of the 'stars' of The Truth is the photographer, Otto Chriek, who is a vampire. A bit of a drawback, given that light is the basis of photography...

Edit: I quite agree about IMO not IMHO. Whether the H is humble or honest, it adds nothing to the phrase.

Cheers,

R.

dmr
05-17-2010, 02:50
My opinions are seldom humble. I use IMAO far more frequently. :)

Keith
05-17-2010, 02:56
I kind of like YMMV.

:D

Leigh Youdale
05-17-2010, 03:02
adds[/I] weight to their statements rather than indicating, in reality, 'these are the mean little views of someone with the social graces of duckweed'."
R.

Love it!

I think I might use IT from now on which means "I think...." rather than having to type the extra letters. Maybe a thought carries more weight than an opinion? A thought is neutral (IT) whereas an opinion carries with it the implication that it has to be defended or argued about.
Then again, who was it said "I think, therefore I am"?

Dave Wilkinson
05-17-2010, 03:03
Oh!....so that's what it means!, my education is lacking - for a long time I thought LOL was an abreviation of the name of someone called Lawrence!
- slightly off the topic, why does nobody here buy anything? they just 'score' it win it, or 'pick it up'!
Dave.

Leigh Youdale
05-17-2010, 03:04
I kind of like YMMV.

:D

I have problems with that Keith - I always read it as "yummy".

Leigh Youdale
05-17-2010, 03:05
Oh!....so that's what it means!, my education is lacking - for a long time I thought LOL was an abreviation of the name of someone called Lawrence!
- slightly off the topic, why does nobody here buy anything? they just 'score' it win it, or 'pick it up'!
Dave.

Do you mean that chap they made the film about - Lawrence of Lebanon?

Chris101
05-17-2010, 03:10
Do you mean that chap they made the film about - Lawrence of Lebanon?

No, the Irish chap: Lawrence O'Liver.

Leigh Youdale
05-17-2010, 03:14
No, the Irish chap: Lawrence O'Liver.

This just gets better! I'll check in the morning to see what other gems appear.

Dave Wilkinson
05-17-2010, 03:23
IMHO - it looks like Roger is back with renewed vigour!....FWIW I was starting to worry! YMMV

oftheherd
05-17-2010, 03:36
It's just internet jargon, and we're on the internet. Nothing to get worked up about.

Basically, I agree. For me, I think In My Humble Opinion and Your Milage May Vary are often used to soften what may sound harsh, or challenging, and show no confrontation is intended.

Of course, I suppose each of us attaches value to these shortcuts based on our own personalities. :D :D

Krzys
05-17-2010, 04:30
..................... tl;dr

batterytypehah!
05-17-2010, 04:35
Oh!....so that's what it means!, my education is lacking - for a long time I thought LOL was an abreviation of the name of someone called Lawrence!

I heard a hilarious account on the radio recently about a guy and his teenage son who used to have online chats with each other even though they lived together. It took the dad months to figure out that his son didn't mean "lots of love" when he typed LOL!

(Some Google searches later)

Must have been The Moth Radio Hour but I don't know which episode.

John Lawrence
05-17-2010, 05:38
Well if the "H" in IMHO stands for humble, then maybe it's because Uriah Heep has a lot of computer savvy descendants?

John

John Lawrence
05-17-2010, 05:40
Well if the "H" in IMHO stands for humble, then maybe it's because Uriah Heep has a lot of computer savvy descendants?

John


..... although on second thoughts, that would make it IMUO with the "U" standing for 'umble!!

rpsawin
05-17-2010, 09:58
H = highfulutan?

Bob

chris000
05-17-2010, 10:53
H = highfulutan?

Bob

I think you will find that's Hifalootin :D

Gumby
05-17-2010, 10:59
I kind of like YMMV.

Would you mind re-phrasing that in metric?

rpsawin
05-17-2010, 11:19
I think you will find that's Hifalootin :D

Is that submitted as "IMHO"? :D

I'll add it to my spell checker.

Thanks,

Bob

antiquark
05-17-2010, 11:21
Better than someone telling me to STFU, STFD or GTFO! (IMNSHO) :)

Brian Sweeney
05-17-2010, 11:24
I know it from Internet Geek Speak in the late 80s and early 90s. It came in about 10 years after I started using the Internet, I never picked up on it myself.

IMHO stands for "I Am Absolutely Right and Everyone Else is Completely Wrong."

Soeren
05-25-2010, 07:12
He he looks like status report here reads SNAFU :)
best regards

Sparrow
05-25-2010, 07:34
edit.

IMHO stands for "I Am Absolutely Right and Everyone Else is Completely Wrong."

So YMMV stand’s for … “you are a fool not agree with me” I suppose?

:)

gliderbee
05-25-2010, 07:45
Oh!....so that's what it means!, my education is lacking - for a long time I thought LOL was an abreviation of the name of someone called Lawrence!
- slightly off the topic, why does nobody here buy anything? they just 'score' it win it, or 'pick it up'!
Dave.

You got it all wrong (IMHO, of course :p): they INVEST in something :p

Stefan.

mackigator
05-25-2010, 08:00
Language is about communicating and conveying meaning. The little text abbreviations do that, so I see no problems with them, save the problem of not knowing if your abbreviation is being understood. And all words have that problem anyway.

Worth looking over, some funny ones:
http://www.netlingo.com/acronyms.php

Roger Hicks
05-25-2010, 08:07
Language is about communicating and conveying meaning. The little text abbreviations do that, so I see no problems with them, save the problem of not knowing if your abbreviation is being understood. And all words have that problem anyway.

Worth looking over, some funny ones:
http://www.netlingo.com/acronyms.php

I think that the OP's point concerned exactly what meaning is conveyed either by the full phrase or by the abbreviation. Sir Terry Pratchett had no doubt, and I rather side with him. See page 146 of The Truth (a novel about newspaper publishing on the Discworld): "And something that distinguishes the Mr. Windlings of this world is the term 'in my humble opinion', which they think adds weight to their statements rather than indicating, in reality, 'these are the mean little views of someone with the social graces of duckweed'."


Cheers,

R.

Soeren
05-26-2010, 03:32
I thought ( having english as a second language) IMHO was more polite than IMO as far as its polite to usen an abbreviation.
Best regards

Leigh Youdale
05-26-2010, 03:38
So who can work this one out (Roger maybe) - WSMV

Rogrund
05-26-2010, 03:47
So who can work this one out (Roger maybe) - WSMV

Wheat streak mosaic virus? :)

Leigh Youdale
05-26-2010, 03:49
Not quite!

SimonSawSunlight
05-26-2010, 03:59
So who can work this one out (Roger maybe) - WSMV

wind surfers may vomit?
who saw my voigtländer?

pagpow
05-26-2010, 04:06
Sir Terry Pratchett sums this one up beautifully in a footnote on page 146 of The Truth (a novel about newspaper publishing on the Discworld): "And something that distinguishes the Mr. Windlings of this world is the term 'in my humble opinion', which they think adds weight to their statements rather than indicating, in reality, 'these are the mean little views of someone with the social graces of duckweed'." R.

+1 for Mr Pratchett --
He nails both the false humility and the smidgeon of anger, IMHO, if you see what I mean.:D

hlockwood
05-26-2010, 04:23
My opinions are seldom humble. I use IMAO far more frequently. :)

Nor are mine, hence, IMNSHO. :p

Harry

Soeren
05-26-2010, 04:54
Who Stole My Voigtländer

Soeren
05-26-2010, 04:56
Illiterates Leica Club?

Roger Hicks
05-26-2010, 05:29
So who can work this one out (Roger maybe) - WSMV

Dear Leigh,

'Fraid not.

Cheers,

R.

JohnTF
05-26-2010, 05:36
I think that the OP's point concerned exactly what meaning is conveyed either by the full phrase or by the abbreviation. Sir Terry Pratchett had no doubt, and I rather side with him. See page 146 of The Truth (a novel about newspaper publishing on the Discworld): "And something that distinguishes the Mr. Windlings of this world is the term 'in my humble opinion', which they think adds weight to their statements rather than indicating, in reality, 'these are the mean little views of someone with the social graces of duckweed'."


Cheers,

R.

What is interesting to me is that these clues left as to your actual intent are mostly limited to written communication as an attempt perhaps to make up for the fact that the person cannot hear the inflections from speech.

"Mr. Windlings" intent is rather something else.

If you are having a casual conversation, it should be more clear when you are stating opinion rather than fact, well if the two people know each other.

When you post something, you do not know your entire audience, present or future.

If you are trying to be precise, say, you are writing a paper for publication or presentation, you may add expressions such as, "That is not to say", "This is the case", as an attempt to eliminate any conclusion you do not intend, or to perhaps reach the word limit imposed by an instructor.

Of course, much is added to lighten the tone of what is posted, I find ;-) useful if not overused, Roger, I believe, does not, that is not to say he would take offence at someone else using them, IMHO, ;-).

If you try to be too precise, the style becomes rather heavy, for example in the first sentence, the "to me" is not entirely necessary.

Also, IMO, if you write a post more than a few lines long, few get to the bottom, or perhaps beyond the first sentence. ;-)

And, LOL, when I was young, meant, "Lots of Luck", normally, and mildly, sarcastic. I think today people would say "Good luck with that".

At least we are spared, "SWAK" on the internet.

Regards, John

Roger Hicks
05-26-2010, 05:42
At least we are spared, "SWAK" on the internet.

Regards, John

Dear John,

SWALK, surely? ('loving')

I always liked the old abbreviations traditionally sent by young sailors to their wives and girlfriends as their ships were about to return to the home port: NORWICH -- (k)Nickers Off Ready When I Come Home -- and BURMA -- Be Undressed Ready My Angel.

Cheers,

R.

JohnTF
05-26-2010, 05:53
Dear John,

SWALK, surely? ('loving')

I always liked the old abbreviations traditionally sent by young sailors to their wives and girlfriends as their ships were about to return to the home port: NORWICH -- (k)Nickers Off Ready When I Come Home -- and BURMA -- Be Undressed Ready My Angel.

Cheers,

R.

Someone in Cleethorpes told me that a box of OMO in the window was not an advert for soap. ;-)

Regards, John

Jamie123
05-26-2010, 05:53
I like smilies. You can write almost anything on the internet and it's ok as long as you add a smiley face at the end.

Jamie123
05-26-2010, 05:55
Dear John,

SWALK, surely? ('loving')

I always liked the old abbreviations traditionally sent by young sailors to their wives and girlfriends as their ships were about to return to the home port: NORWICH -- (k)Nickers Off Ready When I Come Home -- and BURMA -- Be Undressed Ready My Angel.

Cheers,

R.

How romantic :)

Rob-F
05-26-2010, 06:16
I kind of like YMMV.

:D

I feel that for the way that YMMV is used, it should most often be YMMD: "Your Mileage May Differ." Your mileage may vary, in some given instances, from your own average. That's when making a comparison within your own set of data. OTOH, when comparing your mileage with mine, yours may Differ from mine.

IMO, FWIW

Sparrow
05-26-2010, 06:29
I like smilies. You can write almost anything on the internet and it's ok as long as you add a smiley face at the end.

I think there should be a completely blank “enigmatic” smiley … for those of us who are naturally ambivalent.

Sparrow
05-26-2010, 07:10
^ How about a "meh" smiley? ;)

http://images.fanpop.com/images/image_uploads/Smiley---Meh--for-picks--fanpop-38170_75_75.jpg

whatever that is, apathy I expect, but who cares anyway :enigmatic:

JohnTF
05-26-2010, 10:49
How romantic :)

It is Fleet Week in NY, Roger, you still have that uniform? ;-)

The accent gets them every time.

Leigh Youdale
05-26-2010, 17:58
Dear Leigh,

'Fraid not.

Cheers,

R.

Well stab me vitals.
An old English expression of surprise.