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Roger Hicks
01-07-2010, 03:02
...there is a new module on www.rogerandfrances.com about camera movements with pics of Linhofs, Gandolfis, Graphic, MPP, Calumet Cadets, Toho, Walker Titan XL and more, pics taken with same, and 'how to' drawings.

There are also a couple of pics with very shallow depth of field obtained with the use of movements: Rodchenko's Toast and Dave Barber as Rasputin.

See http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subscription/camera%20movements.html,

Karl (the Webmaster) and I are trying to get lots more stuff on the site...

Cheers,

R.

jesse1dog
01-07-2010, 04:58
Excellent Roger - just what I thought 'movements' were, and I've learnt a lot from the module. Can't see how to do 'movements' on my Oly OM though!

Thanks.
Jesse

newspaperguy
01-07-2010, 05:28
Thank you Roger (and Frances) for another beautifully done tutorial.

youngmrcurtis
01-07-2010, 05:29
I'll be venturing into the world of large format just as soon as I get back into the working world, this article is very well timed for me, and useful to boot.

Thanks Roger

robklurfield
01-07-2010, 21:33
roger, simple enough for even someone like me who seems lately to be a few bits of grey matter shy of my original complement of brain cells. this makes it tempting to give a try with LF. nicely done.

35mmdelux
01-07-2010, 21:39
I love LF and wish Id never sold my Master Technika.

aizan
01-07-2010, 22:16
gandolfi makes the variant in 8x10? good to know!

great module, as always.

nikon_sam
01-07-2010, 23:33
I got into LF for the movements...the bigger neg was just a bonus...

fbf
01-07-2010, 23:38
Thank you Roger. Always a pleasure to read your website

Damaso
01-08-2010, 04:48
Clear & concise! This will be a great resource! Thanks...

oftheherd
01-08-2010, 06:06
Thanks much for this addition to your informative site. As I begin my own venture into LF, I am sure I will find much of value.

sleepyhead
01-08-2010, 06:21
Thanks for the article Roger.

But, if you can accept some (what I think is) constructive criticism, then i was hoping to learn MORE about the general principles regarding movements, for example, more about how to control where the plane of focus is placed (tilts mostly to increase depth-of-field), and LESS about specific gear.

Benjamin
01-08-2010, 06:33
Interesting article, thank you.

Roger Hicks
01-08-2010, 09:20
Thanks for the article Roger.

But, if you can accept some (what I think is) constructive criticism, then i was hoping to learn MORE about the general principles regarding movements, for example, more about how to control where the plane of focus is placed (tilts mostly to increase depth-of-field), and LESS about specific gear.

Dear Yaron,

Constructive criticism is always welcome, but I can't really see how I can do much more.

The first requirement is to hoist on board the principles of rise and cross (which I thought I covered reasonably well with drawings and the 'worked example' in Castle Green) and of the Scheimpflug rule (again, there are drawings, and explanations in the captions, especially to Unlucky Pfennig, Broken Treasures 2 and Italian Governor's Palace).

After that, it's essentially a question of how to make your equipment deliver the movements you need, or if you're buying a camera, to make sure it delivers the movements you need, without being distracted by 'specmanship' and movements you'll never need. This is why I tried to include as many different kinds of cameras as possible -- as far from 'specific gear' as I could get.

If, after you've been through the module, you'd be kind enough to tell me what you still don't understand, I'll see if there are any changes I can make.

@Aizan, the Variant accepts interchangeable backs, so with 8x10 on it, you've got quite a short extension (about 450 mm). There's also a 5x7 back, which I have.

@everyone who has responded so far, thanks for the kind words. It's always nice to know that these things don't disappear undetected and unappreciated into cyberspace.

Cheers,

R.

sfb_dot_com
02-09-2010, 16:26
Thanks for the article Roger.

But, if you can accept some (what I think is) constructive criticism, then i was hoping to learn MORE about the general principles regarding movements, for example, more about how to control where the plane of focus is placed (tilts mostly to increase depth-of-field), and LESS about specific gear.

The thing to do here for the theory is to get the book 'Using the View Camera' by Steve Simmons. That explains all you need to know. And for more reading 'The Camera' by Ansel Adams. I have both, but no LF (yet)

Mind you, Roger has done a pretty good job without too much jargon.

Andy

Nando
02-09-2010, 17:07
Thanks Roger. I'm planning on trying LF very soon with a friend's camera. If I like it, I may buy myself a LF kit next year.

Trius
02-09-2010, 17:13
Thank you. At some point I will print the page out in some sort of booklet form, small enough to tuck into my 4x5 kit bag. Once I get a basic mastery, the booklet will stay home, but in the field I need something "hands on" to refer to. This will fit the bill.

Krzys
02-09-2010, 17:23
I have recently started shooting LF and the most confusing aspect for me is how to apply movements to the shallow depth of field seen on my ground glass. I can easily visualize dof, but not with movements involved since it is new to me.

cnphoto
02-09-2010, 17:29
Thanks Roger, these articles will come in useful for me in a few weeks when I make the move in to LF.