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Roger Hicks
12-25-2009, 11:11
What's the best way to cook a 1 kg kangaroo rump roast? Ideally on the barbie or I'll roast it. Marinades? Time?

I eat lots of kangaroo steaks, usually pan-fried and accompanied with a mushroom or pepper cream sauce. I can do the same with this if need be, but all ideas gratefully received. Well, most, probably, anyway.

Cheers,

R.

skibeerr
12-25-2009, 11:46
Bleu ou saignant?

Roger Hicks
12-25-2009, 11:48
:angel:Bleu ou saignant?

Bleu if it can be cooked that way without being too tough. Sinon, saignant.

Cheers,

R.

Leigh Youdale
12-25-2009, 19:25
What's the best way to cook a 1 kg kangaroo rump roast? Ideally on the barbie or I'll roast it. Marinades? Time?

I eat lots of kangaroo steaks, usually pan-fried and accompanied with a mushroom or pepper cream sauce. I can do the same with this if need be, but all ideas gratefully received. Well, most, probably, anyway.

Cheers,

R.

Roger, the Domestic Goddess suggests thusly -
Marinade in red wine, olive oil and herbs to choice for 24-36 hours.
Sear all over quickly in a frypan at high temperature until brown (to seal it).
Get the BBQ as hot as possible - equivalent oven temp 220C - and roast for 20 minutes (rare) or longer for less rare but it's better a bit on the rare side.
Remove from BBQ, place in dish, cover with foil and rest (not cook) in very low oven for the same time that you had it in the BBQ. If you don't rest it, it will be tougher than you'd like.
Remove from oven, remove foil, carve and serve.

Bon Apetit

Leigh Youdale
p.s. It rained in Sydney on Christmas Day - nice present! Inland there are floods where a week ago it was all drought-declared!

pakeha
12-25-2009, 20:08
Roger, the Domestic Goddess suggests thusly -
Marinade in red wine, olive oil and herbs to choice for 24-36 hours.
Sear all over quickly in a frypan at high temperature until brown (to seal it).
Get the BBQ as hot as possible - equivalent oven temp 220C - and roast for 20 minutes (rare) or longer for less rare but it's better a bit on the rare side.
Remove from BBQ, place in dish, cover with foil and rest (not cook) in very low oven for the same time that you had it in the BBQ. If you don't rest it, it will be tougher than you'd like.
Remove from oven, remove foil, carve and serve.

Yep, Kangaroo [ rump esp.] will need a big rest time, covered in foil on top of BBQ lid [ assuming you have one] would be as good as putting in oven on low.

Carefull with the marinade as kangaroo has a distinctive flavour [ gum tree] dont want to lose that with overpowering herbs/too much garlic etc.

Now for the smarty bit - mushroom and pepper cream sauce? you child of the seventies:) try with a good homemade fig and roma tomato salsa / chutney and jus roti.

Leigh Youdale
p.s. It rained in Sydney on Christmas Day - nice present! Inland there are floods where a week ago it was all drought-declared!

Ha, should help to even up the wine/water balance a bit:D

Keith
12-25-2009, 20:47
I'll be curious to hear what you thought of of the 'Skippy' roast Roger ... personally I've never been able to like kangaroo as a meat and I've tried to convince myself I should a few times now ... I find it way too gamey!

No doubt about Aussies ... not too many countries eat their national symbols! :D

peterm1
12-25-2009, 23:12
Kangaroo is a very lean meat so must be well basted or it will end up being dry. It is a dark red meat that reminds me a bit of venison and as someone else says its better not to lose its characteristic flavor and texture. I would advise keeping it quite rare (pink) on the inside to maximize flavor whilst minimizing dryness.

pkreyenhop
12-25-2009, 23:37
There is one convincing reason to have your Skippy roast not too rare: Salmonella
See http://www.smh.com.au/environment/hygiene-threatens-kangaroo-meat-industry-20091117-ikf6.html

Roger Hicks
12-26-2009, 04:22
Armed with your kind and helpful replies I opened the packet and found... 5x 200g steaks! Some bar steward was lying!

Point fully taken about cream sauces but a lot depends on (a) where you're from and (b) where you live. As a Cornishman I am used to the finest cream in the world, bar none; living in France, I can't get it. The sweet/fruit/meat combination -- found in many cuisines -- is one I rarely care for (though when it works it's superb, as in a tajine aux pruneaux) and I have something of a taking against most Italian cuisine, not because it's bad but because it is rarely anything like as good as it thinks it is: it is the most self-overrated cuisine in the world. Much like Italian cars, really.

As for beef, much as I love France, beef is one of the things they can't/don't do, along with household wiring. It's always sold without being hung aything like long enough. We eat mostly veal, lamb and free-range pork, along with donkey, horse and kangaroo. Oh, and wild boar, venison and goat. The French sell all kinds of unusual meats. Anyone else ever try zebra? Oh, dear. And I cannot understand why anyone voluntarily eats ostrich.

Anyone else remember Skipinder the Punjabi kangaroo? Goodness Gracious Me!

Cheers,

R.