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Roger Hicks
11-07-2009, 01:58
...was of course illustrated by RFF member David Manning, whose photographs are the best part of the book (my mail-order copy finally arrived today). The writing is more than somewhat gushing, and recipes that call for unspecified 'vegetable oil' or use such ingredients as Velveeta, proprietary barbecue 'rubs', canned biscuit mix and refrigerated pie crusts barely qualify as recipes in my book.

Even so, there are enough good recipes, with real ingredients, to make it worth buying: I got mine for $23.99 from Barnes and Noble, Andrews McMeel, $29.99 cover price, ISBN-13: 978-0-7407-7392-1, ISBN-10: 0-7407-7392-5. It's an excellent illustration both of how to do a lifestyle-cum-recipe cook-book and (on occasion) how not to do it: the double-page spreads are frankly over-enlarged and the layout is variable.

Cheers,

R.

oftheherd
11-07-2009, 02:36
Don't forget sir, that cowboys in the brush or plains, looking for a meal and back to work, aren't using filet and fine wine. They might be interested in how to take commonly available ingredients and make them a little better for an evening meal.

( commonly can be taken as a double intendre :D )

Trius
11-07-2009, 03:56
I was interested until the word "Velveeta" was used ... :D

Next time I'm at B&N I'll certainly check it out.

oftheherd
11-07-2009, 04:57
I was interested until the word "Velveeta" was used ... :D

Next time I'm at B&N I'll certainly check it out.

Velveeta sells enough that some people must like it. And you have to have it in your kit for bait. The trout love it! Hopefully the book has some trout recipees. Although my favorite was always corn meal with butter, cooked down, then stuffed in the trout; a couple or three minutes per side on a pan size (an eight or ten incher). Quite tasty.

Ronald M
11-07-2009, 05:33
Velveeta- The fim is terrible- the cheese I would not add to the dogs breakfast.

The only stuff that is worse is the cheese in a pressure can.

feenej
11-07-2009, 05:55
I'm an old cowhand from the Rio Grande
And I learned to ride before I learned to stand
Well I'm a ridin fool who is up to date
I know every trail in the Lone Star State
'Cause I ride the range in a Ford V-8
Oh, yippee-i-o-ki-ay, yippee-i-o-ki-ay

(Don't know who wrote that, I love the cover by the Hot Licks)

Roger Hicks
11-07-2009, 06:57
Don't forget sir, that cowboys in the brush or plains, looking for a meal and back to work, aren't using filet and fine wine. They might be interested in how to take commonly available ingredients and make them a little better for an evening meal.

( commonly can be taken as a double intendre :D )

Ah... that would explain page 141, blackened grouper with orange remoulade, or page 115, Dutch's Portobello mushroom burger with herbed mayo and greens...

That's the weird thing about the book. There are some recipes that look good and traditional (Tom's ranch beans, page 39, ranch potato pancakes, page 103); some which are, shall we say, culturally specific (candied bacon with goat cheese, page 97); and some which say, in effect "Rub on a bottle of XYZ sauce and barbecue" (Jack Stack Denver Lamb Ribs, page 180).

Cheers,

R.

Papa Smurf
11-07-2009, 07:16
Velveeta- The fim is terrible- the cheese I would not add to the dogs breakfast.

The only stuff that is worse is the cheese in a pressure can.

Sir, it would seem to some of us that you have a bias away from the supermarket fare. I once thought of spiders only as very nasty little critters that can make you very sick if bitten by one. Then, while on a forced march, I watched our two indigenous guides stop to roast two huge Tarantulas and devour them like they were candy. They even used the fangs as improvised toothpicks. As Briar Rabbit said, "one man's briar patch is another man's home."

I assure you that in many households, Velveeta might not be a gourmet item, but its easy storage, versatility, and readily melted qualities, make for some very tasty dishes.

35mmdelux
11-07-2009, 07:45
I was interested until the word "Velveeta" was used ... :D

Next time I'm at B&N I'll certainly check it out.


Cowboys and Veleeta? oh dear...[Not in this part of the West dude]

steamer
11-07-2009, 07:45
Many a gullible trout has met their maker after a nip of velveeta. Not being a trout, I'm not tempted to put sixteen ounces of the hideous stuff in some kind of ersatz chile con queso recipe that the cow folk supposedly eat. For what it's worth the Pasturised processed cheese product always sounded like a good name for a bad girl in a Chandler novel. So the food and the writing is a little shaky, what about the photos, please tell they are good.

35mmdelux
11-07-2009, 07:47
Throw a t-bone steak on the barbee, pork n' beans and some bread for this cowboy. Swish it down with an ice cold Coors beer.

rovnguy
11-07-2009, 08:02
Looks to me like the snobs here don't understand what it takes to live way out in the country where amenities like refridgeration don't exist.

Gumby
11-07-2009, 08:05
Are there any Spam recipes inthat book, or any that include Hormel canned chili... or those canned tamales?

crawdiddy
11-07-2009, 08:07
I don't like Velveeta 200, but I still like Velveeta 50.

steamer
11-07-2009, 08:08
Looks to me like the snobs here don't understand what it takes to live way out in the country where amenities like refridgeration don't exist.

What there's no refrigeration in trailer parks? (sorry couldn't help myself) If not relating to velveeta makes a guy a snob then I'll do the time for that rap. Oh wait maybe I'm off the hook; I swear to god I had a spam sandwich last week; and I liked it.

35mmdelux
11-07-2009, 08:11
Looks to me like the snobs here don't understand what it takes to live way out in the country where amenities like refridgeration don't exist.

Ever hear of a portable 12-pack "cooler."

Gumby
11-07-2009, 08:15
Ever hear of a portable 12-pack "cooler."

What's a 12-pack?

Roger Hicks
11-07-2009, 08:33
Looks to me like the snobs here don't understand what it takes to live way out in the country where amenities like refridgeration don't exist.

Which 'snobs' are you thinking of?

The ones who think that blackened grouper with orange remoulade is a simple country dish?

Or the ones who think Velveeta is disgusting?

Cheers,

R.

35mmdelux
11-07-2009, 08:40
What's a 12-pack?

Your not serious, right? ...but just in case a 12-pack = 12 beers, conversely you can snag a suitcase of beer. A suitcase = 48 beers. Here in the Southwest we are accoustomed to hauling everything from 6-pack coolers, to suitcase coolers, to monster multiple suitcase coolers. You might say we're party animals.

Gumby
11-07-2009, 08:45
... and then what... you drink it right out of the can? How rustic! I might have to join you some day; I've been doing situps and still can't achieve a six-pack. Perhps it is time to give up and buy a proper "cowboy gut" at the local package store. Sounds like fun, actually!

rbiemer
11-07-2009, 09:17
What's a 12-pack?

Half as much beer as you need for an afternoon...

I guess I fall some where between the extremes on this velveeta thing; In occasional doses and in the right recipe, I think it's fine.
Same for Grouper. Though I'd be interested in which river that came out of...

One other thing; if you're packing all you food in, it may be the better choice to carry tinned biscuits instead of all the separate ingredients. It is a compromise but some times a necessary one.
Rob

oftheherd
11-07-2009, 09:40
...

Same for Grouper. Though I'd be interested in which river that came out of...

...



So would I.

Gumby
11-07-2009, 10:02
I guess I fall some where between the extremes on this velveeta thing; In occasional doses and in the right recipe, I think it's fine.


I hope this isn't giving away some sort of State secret, but hte Velveeta recipe that will convert even the most ardent Velveeta critic is:

Melt Velveta processed cheese food stuff with a can or two of Rotel brand tomato & chile. Stir until if forms a warm and goey concoction. Eat using tortilla chips as an eating utensil. Add chopped-up pickled Jalapeno if you like it hot. Unbelieveabley good! Just don't do too often unless your health plan will pay for a triple- or quadruple-bypass.

amateriat
11-07-2009, 14:18
I wouldn't walk into this (http://iantyson.com/pages/navajomug.asp) place and have the nerve to ask for anything with Velveeta on it. Might give Ian (certifiable cowboy, and I mean that in the best way) a good laugh, though...


- Barrett

pakeha
11-07-2009, 14:27
Originally Posted by rovnguy http://www.rangefinderforum.com/forums/themes/graphite/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.rangefinderforum.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1183669#post1183669)
Looks to me like the snobs here don't understand what it takes to live way out in the country where amenities like refridgeration don't exist.

ahh did not think cowboys had time to cook after Brokeback mountain:eek:

Gumby
11-07-2009, 14:45
For those not "in the know"... REAL cowboy food:

http://www.texmex.net/Rotel/main.htm

or since this is a photographic forum, here:

http://www.ro-tel.com/index.jsp

kuzano
11-07-2009, 15:10
Velveeta- The fim is terrible- the cheese I would not add to the dogs breakfast.

The only stuff that is worse is the cheese in a pressure can.

Velveeta and Dijon Mustard Sandwiches make for darn good eatin' out in the brush hunting Mule deer, or sitting in a Boat on a cold morning waiting for the Kokanee to bite.

The only bad Velveeta sandwich I ever had was the morning my dad made the sandwiches and he forgot to pull the plastic wrap off the single cheese slices. He was used to slicing from the big 2 pound Block O'Cheese velveeta.

Anyway, I didn't really figure out why the velveeta was so chewy until the second sandwich. (Bet you can't eat just one).

I never really knew whether there was a difference between "government surplus cheese" at the food banks, or Velveeta... Aren't they one and the same.

I gotta get that receipt book.

kuzano
11-07-2009, 17:46
What's a 12-pack?

Well, here in Oreygone, we call a 12-pack a "short case", and whether we're hunting mule dear, or fishin for Kokanee, we always have a "short case" in the boat, or behind the pickem up seat, to go with our Velveeta Sammiches.

Two hunters or fishers = 1 "short case" B4 noon
Four = 1 full case B4 noon

JeffGreene
11-07-2009, 18:55
Those of you visiting Philly should try our famous cheesesteak! The authentic version is made with Cheese Wiz which on its own elevates Velveeta to the Camembert level! :D

Al Kaplan
11-07-2009, 19:22
Grouper are salt water fish commonly found on the reefs in warm climes. There are numerous species. The Florida lobster, or crawfish, are affectionately referred to as "bugs".

oftheherd
11-07-2009, 19:39
Grouper are salt water fish commonly found on the reefs in warm climes. There are numerous species. The Florida lobster, or crawfish, are affectionately referred to as "bugs".

And grouper are good tasting; fried, in soup, or even raw. The last I had we took to a Korean restaurant owner we know, who made some raw and some cooked for us. He got some too of couse. I wish I lived closer to the ocean like you Mr. Kaplan. Except in hurricane season of course. :p

I wouldn't try grouper with velveeta however. :D :D

emraphoto
11-07-2009, 20:09
Velveeta- The fim is terrible- the cheese I would not add to the dogs breakfast.

The only stuff that is worse is the cheese in a pressure can.

did i hear someone gettin' down on the froma-jet?

Roger Hicks
11-08-2009, 00:50
Well, here in Oreygone, we call a 12-pack a "short case", and whether we're hunting mule dear, or fishin for Kokanee, we always have a "short case" in the boat, or behind the pickem up seat, to go with our Velveeta Sammiches.

Two hunters or fishers = 1 "short case" B4 noon
Four = 1 full case B4 noon

This reminds me of a joke I heard here recently:

What's the difference between French beer and French hunters?

You can find alcohol-free beer...

The worst cookbook I ever read was South African, published (I think) in the 1960s. Quite a few recipes consisted of 'Follow the instructions on the packet' and the cheese section was good too: 'There are now five kinds of cheese being made in South Africa, so there is no need to buy imported cheeses...'

Cheers,

R.

Olsen
11-08-2009, 02:03
Throw a t-bone steak on the barbee, pork n' beans and some bread for this cowboy. Swish it down with an ice cold Coors beer.

I had something they called 'chilly', which was very good, out in the wild west when I drove across USA back in 91'. American beer was a disappointment that just made us laugh, though.

steamer
11-08-2009, 02:17
I had something they called 'chilly', which was very good, out in the wild west when I drove across USA back in 91'. American beer was a disappointment that just made us laugh, though.

Laugh to keep from crying is more like it, of course nowadays every supermarket has an acre of craft brews. Still nothing like a cold Mack's is there?

Olsen
11-08-2009, 02:54
Laugh to keep from crying is more like it, of course nowadays every supermarket has an acre of craft brews. Still nothing like a cold Mack's is there?

Mack is a beer more to my taste. It's from Tromsų. One of the northliest cities in the world and strong on taste. Japanese beer is also very good and like Finish beer, Lapin Kulta, very underrated.

But...

A fast glance into my fridge; I have - of all things, a few cans of American Budweiser, brewed by Anheuser-Busch. St. Louise, Mo, USA, the can says, and a few 'Slots Classic' from Maribo Bryghus, Maribo, Denmark....

Chris101
11-08-2009, 06:35
... I have - of all things, a few cans of American Budweiser, brewed by Anheuser-Busch. St. Louise, Mo, USA, the can says ...

That's because that is as good as it gets! Except for "bud light" which is especially good when it's over 100°. As for cheese in a pressurized can, we call it "spray cheese" and it is delicious when squirted into the curl of a chicharrone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_rind)!

FallisPhoto
11-08-2009, 07:10
I was interested until the word "Velveeta" was used ... :D

Next time I'm at B&N I'll certainly check it out.

Could be worse. He didn't say Spam.

Gumby
11-08-2009, 09:25
http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,1826,151181-246207,00.html

David_Manning
11-08-2009, 09:33
Roger, thanks again for picking up a copy. I, of course, had no say in the layout or what images were used aside from "publishable" quality. Any really bad ones never saw the light of day!

It was a fun process though. I have twenty copies per my contract with the writers and publisher and everyone in the family knows what they are getting for Christmas!

Take care. Thanks again.

----David.

FallisPhoto
11-11-2009, 06:13
For those not "in the know"... REAL cowboy food:

http://www.texmex.net/Rotel/main.htm

or since this is a photographic forum, here:

http://www.ro-tel.com/index.jsp

"Real" cowboy food: anything that can be made from stuff in a tin can, dried beans, dried rice, pasta, flour, corn meal, bacon, and meat that has been dried, salted or freshly shot. There's no refrigerator on a horse, so anyone carrying Velveeta would have to pour it out of the bottom of a saddlebag.


Velveeta must be the Adult only version of the cheddar cheese i suppose! i can only try and guess how it differs from kraft cheddar?!

Makes you wish for 1958, doesn't it? Velveeta is only very vaguely like cheddar. Maybe what you'd get if you mixed a little cheddar and a lot of American pasturized cheese?

Ade-oh
11-11-2009, 06:32
i have never seen Velveeta sold here (in Aust.), all kids are familiar with Kraft cheddar, in the old days it was in blocks now its in sticks and individual wrapped slices for school lunch sanga's etc ..kids still love it, they pinch it out the fridge as fast as you can buy it :D

Velveeta must be the Adult only version of the cheddar cheese i suppose! i can only try and guess how it differs from kraft cheddar?!

seeing how mums often take their kids shopping i suspect they dont appreciate something about velveeta packaging :rolleyes:...i got a feeling if more Dads did the shopping it would be far (have been in the past) more popular

http://i277.photobucket.com/albums/kk67/retrotography/velveetakraftcheese.jpg

I was about to ask what Velveeta was but now I know! I wonder if it has any relationship to the canned cheese which used to appear in British Army ten-man ration packs and was known as 'cheese possessed'?

Having spent part of my summer vacation this year on a dude ranch in north-eastern California, my main impression of cowboy food was that it appeared in considerable quantities. I was also pleased to note that them ole cowpokes sure do know how to mix a decent cabernet sauvignon...

Roger Hicks
11-11-2009, 07:06
Roger, thanks again for picking up a copy. I, of course, had no say in the layout or what images were used aside from "publishable" quality. Any really bad ones never saw the light of day!

It was a fun process though. I have twenty copies per my contract with the writers and publisher and everyone in the family knows what they are getting for Christmas!

Take care. Thanks again.

----David.

Dear David,

Thanks for shooting it. I just hope that my 'review' (such as it is, above) doesn't upset Grady Spears and June Naylor too much. As I say, the pics were the best bit but there are still enough good recipes to make it worth $23.99 if not $29.99.

Cheers,

R.

Gumby
11-11-2009, 12:21
[quote=FallisPhoto;1186691Velveeta is only very vaguely like cheddar. [/quote]

Velveeta (and Kraft "singles") is only vaguely like ANY kind of cheese. :D

Bob Ross
11-11-2009, 14:28
[QUOTE=Roger Hicks;1183513....... It's an excellent illustration both of how to do a lifestyle-cum-recipe cook-book and (on occasion) how not to do it: the double-page spreads are frankly over-enlarged and the layout is variable.

Cheers,

R.[/QUOTE]

A nice report Roger. Trying to recreate what the cowboy lifestyle might have been isn't an easy thing and translating their food it into current food products adds another stretch. Here in San Antonio, on the Chisom Trail, the usual cowboy food discussions are on Ranch food and not Trail food. There is also a distinct "south of the border" leaning. From a photographic perspective, there is and was little effort put into making the food look good, or the art of plating, so it would require more creativity on the part of the photographer. That probably explains why we don't have any "Food" images from the Civil War....
Bob

rbiemer
11-12-2009, 21:40
Maybe it goes well with potted meat product?
Vienna Sausage(equivalent to "souse meat" and pronounced VI-enna) and Velveeta isn't such a good combo in my opinion.
Melt/soften the Velveeta and add some pimento or roasted red bell pepper and garlic and there's good sandwich fixin's!
Rob