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Larry Kellogg
06-07-2005, 01:36
Hello,
I noticed some dust spots at higher apertures in some of my shots. It seems like it is time to clean the sensor. Should I try this myself or ask Calumet to help me out? I know this is just one of those things you have to deal with when shooting a digital camera. Of course, I could just clone out the spots which are readily apparent in blue skies, especially.

Has anyone cleaned their sensor yet? Any advice? Should I just try a handheld blower before resorting to other cleaning methods?

Regards,

Larry

jaapv
06-07-2005, 02:01
Yes, try a handheld blower and do surf the internet. I doubt that there is any single subject in digital photography that has generated as many posts in all digital forums as this one.
There are basically five options:
1. do nothing and use the clone-tool in photoshop.
2. use the Rocket Blower and blow the dust away (NEVER canned air, you risk gumming your sensor up with hard to remove gunk)
3.use the sensor brush, available on the internet, a very good and safe method but the brushes are outrageously expensive.
4.use the copperhil swabbing method, using eclipse fluid and sensor swabs. A good method, but scary to do for beginners.
5 send your camera in for a clean, but a lot of posters agree that that is expensive and useless.

pfogle
06-07-2005, 04:11
I use the Copperhill method, and have found it effective. I would recommend getting a locking cable release to hold the shutter open (I didn't, and you have to keep the shutter button down, which is a bit hairy). It's easier to clean than a DSLR, as the sensor isn't so far back.

Phil

saxshooter
06-07-2005, 04:51
I was told that the reason D-SLR's have a "Clean Sensor" function is that it allows the mirror/shutter open with the CCD powered OFF. The reason for this being that leaving a powered CCD exposed for a long period of time can burn out the chip. Is this still true?

Since the RD-1 has no "Clean Sensor" function I would do it (hold down the shutter button at Bulb setting) in a room with subdued light.

bobofish
06-07-2005, 05:03
Consult your physician before....

Well, anyway, one thing you can do with canned air is to deflect it off of something else before the airstream hits a sensitive object, like a sensor.
It keeps any of the gunk from hitting the sensor, and obviously it also puts a lot less pressure on the delicate CCD.
I don't personally have an RD-1, but I have a very expensive videocamera, which has the inestimable distinction of being one of the most expensive videocameras in thehistory of the world to repair and service....consequently one develops tricks to do things like clean the sensor that can stagger the mind.
Another thing that many people don't think to do is to use a vacuume cleaner to suck the dust off...

I DO NOT MEAN FOR YOU TO PUT THE VACCUUM ON THE SENSOR>>>

simply hold the nozzle a few inches away from the camera, and very often, it will suck all the dust off the sensor, as well as all the other pesky dust from inside the housing, which would eventually get on your sensor anyway.

And of course the old adage applies...the best way to keep lenses (and sensors) clean is to not clean them! (unless you have to, and then be very very ginger)

J. Borger
06-07-2005, 05:35
Yep .. Copperhil Method ... what works on a DSLR works even better on the R-D1 .
You have to keep the shutter open with your thumb though! No sensor cleaning mode available.
I'm not sure i would trust a cable release to keep the shutter open!


Han

KEH
06-07-2005, 16:08
I've cleaned mine once using (i) a locking cable release, and (ii) a sensorbrush from Visible Dust. Expensive but very quick and works like a charm.

Kirk

Larry Kellogg
06-08-2005, 01:44
I've cleaned mine once using (i) a locking cable release, and (ii) a sensorbrush from Visible Dust. Expensive but very quick and works like a charm.

Kirk

Could you post a link for Visible Dust? I haven't heard of them. Thanks for all the responses. Yes, this is not an operation I look forward to performing...

Larry

KEH
06-08-2005, 15:59
You can find it at http://www.visibledust.com/

There are reviews on Luminous Landscape, Outback Photo and Rob Galbraith.

Cheers,
Kirk

sf
06-08-2005, 18:21
use a can of air duster - and be sure to avoid tipping it (liquid will destroy the sensor at that temperature). I cleaned my d70 that way, and it worked like a charm.

RML
05-21-2006, 10:19
When using the Copperhill method, do people use the SensorSweep or the SensorSwipe? And, if used, what size SensorSwipe for the R-D1?

I'm in terrible need of a clean and reliable sensor cleaning method. The dust is getting out of hand. :)

Bob Parsons
05-21-2006, 10:39
I was told that the reason D-SLR's have a "Clean Sensor" function is that it allows the mirror/shutter open with the CCD powered OFF. The reason for this being that leaving a powered CCD exposed for a long period of time can burn out the chip. Is this still true?

Since the RD-1 has no "Clean Sensor" function I would do it (hold down the shutter button at Bulb setting) in a room with subdued light.

I doubt there's any truth in that. I think the only damage that may occur from prolonged exposure to light is for the dyes used in the RGB Bayer filters to bleach.

There may be a very very remote possibilty that exposing the sensor to very intense light whilst powered could cause the chip to "latch up". This is usually destructive. It all depends on design and fabrication. I used to work in the semiconductor industry designing such devices.

Bob.

LCT
05-21-2006, 13:06
Same for Nikon DSLRs and Epson R-D1: Eclipse + Sensor Swab
http://www.photosol.com/swabproduct.htm
Best,
LCT

jlw
05-21-2006, 19:25
I was told that the reason D-SLR's have a "Clean Sensor" function is that it allows the mirror/shutter open with the CCD powered OFF. The reason for this being that leaving a powered CCD exposed for a long period of time can burn out the chip. Is this still true?

Since the RD-1 has no "Clean Sensor" function I would do it (hold down the shutter button at Bulb setting) in a room with subdued light.

The reason DSLRs have a "clean sensor" function is that when the sensor is powered on, it generates a static charge on its surface and this can attract more dust. The "clean" mode allows you to open the shutter without powering up the sensor.

Although the R-D 1 lacks a special "clean" mode, it does allow the same thing -- just remove the memory card. This prevents the CCD from being energized when you turn the camera on. Then just set it to bulb, lock open the shutter with a locking cable release, and clean with a blower bulb. Make sure you're using a fully-charged battery.

This info came directly from Epson's product support bulletin on sensor cleaning, which I'll attach to this message -- or you should be able to download it here. (http://files.support.epson.com/pdf/psb/psb.2005.11.001/psb.2005.11.001.pdf)