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Roger Hicks
09-30-2008, 13:50
... and then try to repeat them. Exposure; focus; wrong frame-lines selected... ANY mistake can succeed. If it does, pretend it was deliberate; try to work out what went wrong; and see if you can use it deliberately creatively next time (instead of accidentally).

Any thoughts on this? Examples?

Cheers,

R.

Highway 61
09-30-2008, 14:00
A funny book for you to read it, maybe ? ;)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41XVC5VEY3L._SS500_.jpg

tmfabian
09-30-2008, 14:01
I do this all the time in golf...does that count?

charjohncarter
09-30-2008, 14:08
I have a few hundred, the only problem maybe they aren't creative. But at least I know how to make one of my cameras look like a Brownie Hawkeye:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3093/2503908194_5ebfafdc72.jpg?v=0

ChrisN
09-30-2008, 14:15
The solarisation technique?

raid
09-30-2008, 18:20
If you are aware that you are committing so-called "errors" in photography, and you don't like the results, and you keep on repeating these errors, then ... this is not really good photography anymore. You are being sloppy. On the other hand, if you take photos and you like what you are getting, then even if someone else may tell you that you are being sloppy, I suggest that you continue doing what you were doing if you like the results and if you are not convinced by the other person's arguement(s).

Food for thought ... ?

Highway 61
10-03-2008, 12:17
If you are aware that you are committing so-called "errors" in photography, and you don't like the results, and you keep on repeating these errors, then ... this is not really good photography anymore. You are being sloppy. On the other hand, if you take photos and you like what you are getting, then even if someone else may tell you that you are being sloppy, I suggest that you continue doing what you were doing if you like the results and if you are not convinced by the other person's arguement(s).

There is an old joke telling that L. Van Beethoven was so deeply deaf that he kept thinking, for the whole life of his, that what he was doing was some artistic painting actually.

nikon_sam
10-03-2008, 12:34
I never make mistakes and all my photos are works of art worthy of only the top museums in the country...any time a photo doesn't come out as expected I return the camera back to the repair shop...it must be broken...again ;) :D

Spider67
11-10-2008, 07:32
Newton (Helmut that is) tells in his memoirs when he got a new kind of flash to try the models eyes in all shots were red.......He was disturbed but his clients took it for a wonderful effect.....

dmr
11-10-2008, 08:02
Here's an obvious mistake which kinda worked:

http://i14.tinypic.com/522648x.jpg

More on this one here:

http://omababe.blogspot.com/2007/09/o-bang-double-take.html

David Goldfarb
11-10-2008, 08:08
I'd like to try to make more mistakes like this one--

http://www.echonyc.com/~goldfarb/temp/BrooklynBridgeandMananaIsland,2007-8.jpg

I forgot about the Brooklyn Bridge shot in one of my 4x5" Grafmatic filmholders, and it was still there when I made the second one of Manana Island (a.k.a "Rabbit Island"), one of the little islands off the coast of O'ahu.

To do it intentionally, I'd need to keep regular double sided filmholders with images that have double exposure potential and to trace the images on the groundglass.

Roger S
11-13-2008, 12:36
This one was a seriously poorly read exposure (way over-exposed), but I pass it off as a deliberate "high-key" shot.

Al Kaplan
11-13-2008, 12:46
I'm sure that a lot of "great art" and "great music" started out as a mistake. Don't forget to charge more money for your prints now.

Sanders McNew
11-13-2008, 21:42
... and then try to repeat them. Exposure; focus; wrong frame-lines selected... ANY mistake can succeed. If it does, pretend it was deliberate; try to work out what went wrong; and see if you can use it deliberately creatively next time (instead of accidentally).

Any thoughts on this? Examples?

Cheers,

R.

Roger, greetings.

When Melanie first used Jobo tanks on
roller bases, the agitation was such that
it left gutters at the edges of the film.
She decided that it added to the look
she was after, and incorporated it into
her photography. Many of her prints
in "Jacob's Ladder" show gutters.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/134/344568551_e7d6d8f8c4.jpg

I hope this note finds you well.

Sanders

rbiemer
11-14-2008, 06:18
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3239/3029917758_8f18ecfeb6.jpg?v=0
I was sitting on my porch as it was getting dark and knew I wouldn't really be able to hand hold the camera at as slow a shutter speed as I was using but shot it any way and am pretty pleased with it.
Now I have to try to successfully do this on demand.
Rob