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Roger Hicks
08-22-2008, 02:33
Specifically, EU-US and vice versa. Most of us use some Japanese kit, and buy Chinese goods if we can't avoid it. But what would you REALLY miss if you couldn't buy US-made goods in the EU and EU-made goods in the US?

Living in the EU, I'd nominate Kodak, Leatherman tools, Maglite torches (flashlights) and Weber barbecues for a start. When I lived in the USA there'd obviously be Ilford, Leica, Billingham, BMW and Moto-Guzzi motorcycles, Swiss Army knives and quite a range of foodstuffs, especially olive oil.

Try to keep it to goods manufactured in the respective areas, e.g. not Levis jeans (the pair I'm wearing as I type this, bought in the USA, were made in Colombia) or Marks and Spencers underpants (Egypt). On the other hand, by all means include things bought in the other area and brought home with you (Craftsman tools and Fruit of the Loom T-shirts, for me in the EU; Overbury bicycles when I lived in the USA).

This was prompted by discussions elsewhere on the forum about the weakness of the dollar and what people buy from outside their own economic bloc. It is NOT intended to 'bash' either side: rather, to explore what either side does best, and how aware people are of good products from outside their own economic bloc.

Cheers,

Roger

Paul T.
08-22-2008, 02:58
While the US has exprted too much of its industry, you can find the real thing (like Levi's) if you look hard enough.

My staples, without which life would be unbearable:
Fender Telecasters (mine was made in Orange County in 1952, but the Custom SHop designs are excellent).
Levi's 501 (buy the LVC range, they're made in the US using the original narrow loom fabric eg http://www.manufactum.co.uk/Produkt/174190/1394799/JeansLevis501XX.html)
Red Wing boots... (manufactum do them too, at a premium of course)
and french's american mustard. Sweet, cheap, vinegary and perfect on a bacon'n'egg butty.

(and if i was in the US, I'd still be eulogising the MIni, and Tricker's boots).

Spyderman
08-22-2008, 03:13
probably lots of good deals on american ebay ?

Roger Hicks
08-22-2008, 03:25
Wow! I'd no idea they still made 'proper' 501s -- but at $185 for a pair in the US, and around $250 in the UK -- I suppose I'll live with the Colombian variety!

Thanks very much for this fascinating piece of news.

French's mustard is definitely a matter of taste. In the US I bought Colman's (and still do in France).

Cheers,

Roger

dexdog
08-22-2008, 03:29
It sounds trivial, but I would miss French mustard- my favorite is Pommery green peppercorn. Wonderful stuff.

feenej
08-22-2008, 03:36
Really good Belgian and English beer. Some English beer has a malty flavor that is not duplicated here at all. All our good beer in the USA tastes like German beer.

Paul T.
08-22-2008, 03:42
LOL, good point. I was in Ashley's bar in Ann Arbor Michigan a couple of weeks ago, and was overjoyed to see they had Meantime beer, which is brewed just down the road from me.

Booze and entertainment - Britain's great gift to the world.

Krosya
08-22-2008, 04:10
Well, I live in US. And I cant even think of what I buy that is American (made here that is). I'm sure there is something, but nothing comes to mind.
Things I like:
Food - I like Mexican, Japanese and Italian.
Cameras, Electronics and Auto - Japanese.
Clothes - dont really care, so I suppose made some place in Asia.
Watches - again - Japanese.
Beer - Non American. Wine - Australian or French. Hard stuff - Ukrainian Vodka, Mexican Tequila and Jamaican Rum.
So, if I moved to...lets say Europe, or Australia, or Asia - I wouldnt miss much it seems.
Maybe Cigarettes? I found that I prefer American made ones.

oftheherd
08-22-2008, 04:31
Interesting thread Mr. Hicks. But actually, I long ago learned to adapt, as I am sure you have. What I couldn't get, I just did without. Besides, my tastes are fairly simple. I got a 50mm f/1.4 lens on the cheap, loved it and wanted more. I still haven't done so due to cost. I had acquired some Fujinons and they are quite good. I have a tendency to go for used Japanese and German folders now. But that's not what this thread is about.

I guess I just learn to get what I need from wherever. But you raise an interesting point. What if for some reason, all overseas commerce was interupted for some reason. No more inexpensive clothing, watches, or good vehicles. Most oriental food my wife and I would want is grown in the US, but not all, and not always of the same taste.

Fact is, I don't think there is anything I depend on that I couldn't get here in the US, if not of the same quality. But that is just me. Well, actually, I just thought. I sure would miss my green tea.

dexdog
08-22-2008, 04:49
Really good Belgian and English beer. Some English beer has a malty flavor that is not duplicated here at all. All our good beer in the USA tastes like German beer.

I don't agree that all USA beer tastes like german brews. Many of the biggest microbrews (yes, it sounds like a contradiction, but isn't) are in the style of a British beer, an india pale ale. Sierra Nevada is an example, and a many brewers make an IPA, a bitter or an ESB. Similarly, there are lots of Belgian style brews available out of Colorado, such as Fat Tire, or Ommegang out of Kentucky.

Speakin of Beer though, I would miss Belgian Trappist-style ales and Samuel Smith's from England

Roger Hicks
08-22-2008, 05:24
But actually, I long ago learned to adapt, as I am sure you have. . .

Very true. There are some things you just put up with not being able to get, such as clotted cream and pork pies, and others where you adapt: Anchor Steam beer, or the SLO Brewery instead of Marston's Old Roger.

It just intrigued me that the manufactured goods I bought were so unexpected -- such as the Weber barbecue. My other barbecue is made of substantial chunks of bent steel and was made in France, but of course I can't smoke-cook food with it.

Cheers,

Roger

kevin m
08-22-2008, 05:26
I am old, but will never be old man enough for a Mercedes or a Porsche.

Allright, I'll take your bait: What does that even mean?

To the question: I miss affordable European cars already. In this great capitalist shopping center of ours, we haven't had a French or Italian car available for twenty years or more. Now that gas is over $4.00 a gallon here, perhaps that will change. I hope so.

Chriscrawfordphoto
08-22-2008, 06:40
Monfrotto tripods (or Gitzo, also made by Monfrotto in Italy now)

Gossen Lightmeters. Well ok, you can buy Sekonic or get a used Minolta that are just as good. But I don't know any tripod maker in Asia or the USA that is up to Monrfotto/Gitzo quality. Tiltall tripods used to be USA made....are they still around?

wlewisiii
08-22-2008, 07:18
Heh. Let's see, EU product I'd miss...
Zeiss
Triumph Motorcycles
Guinness & Samuel Smiths
Foma film
Scotch Whisky
Irish whiskey
Various & sundry munchies from all over Europe

William

Graham Line
08-22-2008, 07:44
Let's see. From the EU, Ilford, Beck's, Reissdorf, O.K./Okocim, BMW, Volkswagen (though the kid's is from Mexico), all sorts of cheeses . . . there's a pattern here. Then there are kitchen knives and rieslings.
The man who mentioned Red Wings needs to look into Danner boots.
I'm not sure anyone in the US makes a really crisp pilsener yet, and Portland here is overstuffed with brewers.

Graham Line
08-22-2008, 07:46
Tiltall tripods used to be USA made....are they still around?

Tiltalls now seem to come from China and don't feel like the same grade of aluminum or quality of machining at the N.J. ones.

kevin m
08-22-2008, 07:54
....just took out the recycling and noticed several empty bottles of Sauvignon Blanc from the Marlborough region of New Zealand so, evidently, I guess I'd miss those. :D

Pablito
08-22-2008, 07:56
just foods and booze. What else matters?:D

ferider
08-22-2008, 08:00
Funny that nobody mentions electronics.

How about the American sensor in your German camera, Roger ?

For more complex systems, nowadays, they typically come from a variety of countries, and "made in ..." only means assembled in.

For example, anybody who uses a modern AMD chip, it might come from Dresden.

Or a SmartCard, might mostly come from Munich. Etc.

Living in the US, I truly miss German bread and Wurst. :)

Cheers,

Roland.

Roger Hicks
08-22-2008, 08:12
How about the American sensor in your German camera, Roger ?

Dear Roland,

I was under the impression it was a Kodak KAF-10500. Kodak was the first US company I named in the original post. And that was one of the products I had in mind.

Funny how no-one thinks of Kodak as an electronics company...

Cheers

ferider
08-22-2008, 08:16
Dear Roland,

I was under the impression it was a Kodak KAF-10500. Kodak was the first US company I named in the original post. And that was one of the products I had in mind.

Funny how no-one thinks of Kodak as an electronics company...

Cheers

Dear Roger,

The chip was manufactured by a different Kodak-partner company in Vermont. But you are right,
when I read Kodak, I first (wrongly) read "film". Personal bias, I guess.

Best,

Roland.

kevin m
08-22-2008, 08:20
Well I live on the East Coast where there is no longer anywhere to drive, which is not basically bumper to bumper...

You live in NYC, Fred. I live two hours from you and both my neighbors have livestock. Plenty of room out here in the country. :D

chris000
08-22-2008, 09:48
I very rarely even look to see where the goods I buy are made - should I be ashamed of that?

photovdz
08-22-2008, 13:49
if I had to move... to the states...
- european social security network ;-)
- french cheeses (especially the ones with unpasteurised milk)
- living beers... (belgian)
- raw dried ham...

an old 2 cv...

What I need from the state... oversized jeans (levis only import up to 40-42... and I need larger ...) and music... some kind of freedom...

(but I would love to ban Harley davidson bikes from my vicinity... too much noise...)

JohnTF
08-23-2008, 19:58
France, mustard, Sauterne, Fois Gras, Herbs de Province, Margeaux, and any kind of cheese, plus bread when you can get it, various alcols.

Czech, Pleas shorts, any Czech beer, Foma 200, R09. I like Croatian beer as well, the Czech cheeses are great, but do not see them here, actually, I try to buy shorts there, plus Schnitzel, well I guess it is not imported ;-).

Italy, well, I live two miles from Little Italy, and the most common restaurant here is Italian, and Amarone plus wines that begin with B, and expresso machines.

Britain, well, the fuel pump is bad on the MG, I may offer it to Roger, any thing to trade? 1970 Roadster BRG. Do not understand mushy peas, did the can get run over? ;-) Scotland, whisky of course, especially Islay.
Anything Ilford.

US, great steaks and BBQ, plus A1 on the fries (chips). Good Napa wine.
Roger's articles in Shutterbug.

Germany, Zeiss and Leitz glass, various sausages, ORWO film, too late, Dobros Torte. Is Jobo still around?

Japan, any number of lenses choices, and the German Japan stuff.

Switzerland, watches and knives.

gavinlg
08-24-2008, 06:20
Well pretty much everything seeing how I live in Australia and basically everything except for the crap local beer is made overseas.

dazedgonebye
08-24-2008, 06:36
Ilford and Monfrotto I would miss. I'd miss the occasional specialty food item.
I don't know. Maybe I need to look around and find that my home is full of things I did not know came from the EU, but I don't think so.
I associate imports from the EU as high end luxury items that I can get by without or find cheaper alternatives from the other side of the world.
I've never owned a fancy car, and would not if money were no object (my car friends say I have no soul). There are a great many very good American wines on the odd occasion when I want wine.
I don't imagine I'll ever own a Leica when my Bessa is functionally more than adequate to my needs at a fraction of the cost (again, no soul I guess).

Nothing from any part of the world that can't be found from another part.

Roger Hicks
08-24-2008, 07:14
Nothing from any part of the world that can't be found from another part.
Dear Steve,

Definitely untrue with foodstuffs, as you say. Also for cars, though you carefully exclude those. But after that, you do get regional expertise: cast-iron cookware (American if not enamelled, French if enamelled), specialist cutlery (Solingen, Sheffield), twelve-bore shotguns (England), watchmaking (Switzerland), etc.

Yes, you can often find a substitute; but it may not be as good a substitute.

Cheers,

R.

amateriat
08-24-2008, 10:40
Funny about the origin of certain brands, and how they change: I was recently looking up some info on some Quad electrostatic speakers, and discovered, rather late, that this venerable British hi-fi company is alive, well, and thriving...in China. (A former colleague of mine, from a previous lifetime, wrote up this (http://www.stereophile.com/features/405china/) piece about it.)

Anyway...a glance around the joint here brings up the following items:

Ilford XP2 (UK)

Boddington's Ale (UK, but my fave brews are very local [Blue Point Brewery, Long Island] and Blue Moon [a few states West])

Assorted red wines (Spain)

Victorinox Swiss Army Knives! (Guess where): Why has no one mentioned these yet? I have two: a Super Tinker/Explorer that replaced a much older one I lost a few years back, and a CyberTool (with flashlight and additional tech-related tools) that I got for my Birthday in January. Possibly the most useful single item I've ever owned, or at least damned close.

Alex Moulton bicycles (UK) Nothing like 'em. Expensive, though.

Schwalbe tires (Germany): they make great tires for my Moulton's oddball tire size (17"). Actual manufacture is Asian, however.

Sigma Sport cyclcocomputers (Germany): I have an older wireless model on my Moulton.

Braun Triumph electric toothbrush (Germany): No, not the one with the silly separate "brushing progress" LCD panel, but the slightly cheaper version with the (only slightly-less-silly) display built into the handle.

That's about it. Things get murky with some of my other stuff: Example: I have a quintet of manual-wind Hamilton watches, dating from 1959 to about 2004. Depending on date of manufacture, the cases, dials and wristbands hail from either here (US), or Asia (HK for the earlier stuff, PRC for the most recent). But all the movements are Swiss.

It'll be interesting to see how spikes in energy costs reshuffle the deck in terms of our current "globalized" manufacturing chain.


- Barrett

Paul Fierberg
08-24-2008, 15:22
How could we in the U.S.forget a great homegrown maker of aircraft Boeing ?One of the all time greats.Try getting along without their products.

Matthew Allen
08-24-2008, 16:32
How could we in the U.S.forget a great homegrown maker of aircraft Boeing ?One of the all time greats.Try getting along without their products.

*cough*Airbus*cough*

Matthew

wlewisiii
08-24-2008, 16:51
*cough*Airbus*cough*

Matthew

Sigh. THAT just make me miss Douglas all the more. I grew up watching old DC-3's going in and out of our local airport. Those remain the greatest of all airplanes.

William

maddoc
08-24-2008, 18:08
Dear Roger,

interesting question ! I am often asked by friends what I do miss most since I started living in Japan and except for German bread and Wurst (I second Roland on this), there is nothing that I really miss being "Made in Germany" ...

If I couldn't get Kodak's photo-chemicals (developer) and films or Gitzo tripods or parts / service for Leica and Hasselblad, that's something I would really miss. Cameras made in Japan ? No alternative for me ...

Cheers,

Gabor

the_jim
08-24-2008, 19:37
Hmmm...interesting topic.

I really enjoy Newcastle Beer, old Marshall amps, Vox, Kilkenny, English breakfast at The Cock 'n Bull in Santa Monica (the place from the opening scene of "Leaving Las Vegas") and older, American inspired, British Music.

It seems that a lot of Brits end up in Los Angeles - possibly for the good weather?

Also, a good point was made earlier about the borderless nature of modern day products. A good example is Cooke. A British company, that still produces its lenses in the UK, but is owned by an American, and whose current products were created by an American lens designer. Also, they are beautiful.

Roger Hicks
08-24-2008, 21:52
A British company, that still produces its lenses in the UK, but is owned by an American, and whose current products were created by an American lens designer.

Are the movie lenses also American-designed? I'm not arguing: I just don't know.

Cheers,

R.

Paul Fierberg
08-25-2008, 02:13
Sigh. THAT just make me miss Douglas all the more. I grew up watching old DC-3's going in and out of our local airport. Those remain the greatest of all airplanes.

William
You are right when I lived in Florida used to fly from Key West to Miami in a DC-3 nice gentle bird low and slow breathtaking views of the keys.

dazedgonebye
08-25-2008, 12:20
Dear Steve,

Definitely untrue with foodstuffs, as you say. Also for cars, though you carefully exclude those. But after that, you do get regional expertise: cast-iron cookware (American if not enamelled, French if enamelled), specialist cutlery (Solingen, Sheffield), twelve-bore shotguns (England), watchmaking (Switzerland), etc.

Yes, you can often find a substitute; but it may not be as good a substitute.

Cheers,

R.

I seldom need "as good." Good enough does it for me.

My (American made) Toyota is actually better than a BMW, if value as transportation is factored in. As a soul stirring thing of beauty to make the heart beat faster and the adrenaline pump...it falls behind just a tad...but that's not what I buy a car for.
Really, it's not that I don't appreciate fine things, it's just that I don't usually indulge in them.
Given a choice between driving a nicer car and funding my kid's education (not to mention my retirement), I'm (almost) happy to drive my 10 year old 160,000 mile econo-box. Heck, I'm old, bald and terminally married...how cool am I going to look even in a sports car?

tbarker13
08-25-2008, 12:49
Things I would hate to do without:

From the U.S.:
Jeep Wrangler
Les Baer 1911 handguns

From the U.K:
Barbour jackets
Land Rovers

From Belgium:
St. Feuillien's Cuvee de Noel beer

From Italy:
Stipula fountain pens

Roger Hicks
08-25-2008, 12:55
Really, it's not that I don't appreciate fine things, it's just that I don't usually indulge in them.


Dear Steve,

Bit of a dull life, that.

Besides, 'the best' is not always the same as 'the most expensive'. I buy air-dried hams -- a couple a year -- from a tiny shop in Biota in Spain. I've never had better hams. But they're about $100-$110 each, and you can easily pay twice that for a French or Italian ham with more snob appeal.

Also. 'the best' is often a matter of opinion. There's only one motorcycle that comes close for me to my 30-year-old BMW R100RS -- and that would be my second choice (Hesketh V1000). Likewise my 36-year-old Series III 88 inch Land Rover. Yes, I've spent quite a lot on trying to get it the way I want it, and there's more to come (leaky gearbox). But it's worth it to me. Others might think I'm crazy, and prefer a newer 'bike or car.

Well, they're welcome. But within the realms of what I want, 'good enough' is generally quite a bit above 'kinda average'. At the least, if I can afford it, I want 'very good': good Greek olive oil, Mephisto boots, Levis jeans, Leatherman and Wenger or Victorinox pocket tools. My wife feels the same. I'm 12 years older than you; possibly balder; certainly terminally married (26 years last June); and my wife is, for me, part of 'the best'.

Cheers,

R.

Roger Hicks
08-25-2008, 12:58
From the U.S. . . Les Baer 1911 handguns

Dear Tim,

Ah, yes indeed. I have my late father-in-law's 1934/35 Colt National Match.

Cheers,

R.

Paul Fierberg
08-25-2008, 15:26
One of the best USA made products are Dexter Russell knives if you never have used one in the kitchen get one of their 6"blade white plastic handle food processing knives...You won't believe how wonderful they are to work with sharp as a razor and easy to sharpen.Used them all the time on my boat and then brought them in the house after my boating days.http://www.dexter-russell.com

MacDaddy
08-25-2008, 15:50
Hmm! USA only products for me include Sterzing's Potato Chips out of Burlington, Iowa and Boetje's Horseradish Mustard made in my old hometown of Davenport, Iowa. None better, as far as I'm concerned!

JohnTF
08-26-2008, 18:10
I want 'very good': good Greek olive oil, Mephisto boots, Levis jeans, Leatherman and Wenger or Victorinox pocket tools. My wife feels the same. I'm 12 years older than you; possibly balder; certainly terminally married (26 years last June); and my wife is, for me, part of 'the best'.

Cheers,

R.[/quote]

You shock me for the first time, cannot imagine you think that Wenger could be near the quality of Victorinox. ;-)

John

ps-- any chance of picking up a spare ham?

amateriat
08-26-2008, 19:42
You shock me for the first time, cannot imagine you think that Wenger could be near the quality of Victorinox.
The knives, maybe, but everything else? ('Specially the watches...!)

Which reminds me, tangentially of course, of something I left off my list:

Lamy fountain pens (Germany, preferably piston-filled). :D


- Barrett

Chriscrawfordphoto
08-26-2008, 20:12
Wenger is a division of Victorinox. Victorinox bought them out in 2005

http://www.wenger.ch/knife/Company/History/History.html

amateriat
08-26-2008, 20:19
Wenger is a division of Victorinox. Victorinox bought them out in 2005

http://www.wenger.ch/knife/Company/History/History.html
A fact which I (in)conveniently forgot. Thanks for the reminder, Chris. :)


- Barrett

amateriat
08-27-2008, 09:22
One of the best USA made products are Dexter Russell knives if you never have used one in the kitchen get one of their 6"blade white plastic handle food processing knives...You won't believe how wonderful they are to work with sharp as a razor and easy to sharpen.Used them all the time on my boat and then brought them in the house after my boating days.http://www.dexter-russell.com
Thanks for the tip, Paul. I've been prodding galfriend about getting a second knife for the kitchen when we're working together on dinner, but can't agree on what to get (I wanted to get an 8" Wusthof to match the one we have; she doesn't want to spend that much, but wants a good knife with a similar heft and "feel").

And, our toaster-oven just died...(kitchen implements...worse than cameras, but lots of fun watching one's significant other deal with GAS for a change!) :D


- Barrett

KoNickon
08-27-2008, 10:29
Barrett, check out Lamson & Goodnow Lamsonsharp knives, made in Shelburne Falls, MA.

I would miss Volkswagens (I doubt a Porsche Cayman will ever come my way; Audis are just more expensive VWs; BMWs and Mercedeses are too expensive to own).

I'd miss Italian wines and olive oils, Swiss watches, British loudspeakers, Deutsche Grammophon/Philips/London/Hyperion CDs (and all other European labels).

We're currently renovating our kitchen, so it'd probably make decisionmaking easier if some of the high-end Euro ovens, cooktops, sinks etc. weren't available.

amateriat
08-27-2008, 10:50
Barrett, check out Lamson & Goodnow Lamsonsharp knives, made in Shelburne Falls, MA.
Now look what I've started! (I'll check it out, thanks.)

I'd miss Italian wines and olive oils, Swiss watches, British loudspeakers, Deutsche Grammophon/Philips/London/Hyperion CDs (and all other European labels).
Ditto. (I'm thinking of Chandos, Nimbus, Bis, and a bunch of smaller yet wonderful labels, putting out great music.)


- Barrett

oscroft
08-27-2008, 12:35
Apple Mac computers

robert blu
08-27-2008, 12:48
I agree with oscroft : my mac and I add my boots ! (Timberland) but I know both are not produced in usa ! )
rob

Paul Fierberg
08-27-2008, 13:08
Thanks for the tip, Paul. I've been prodding galfriend about getting a second knife for the kitchen when we're working together on dinner, but can't agree on what to get (I wanted to get an 8" Wusthof to match the one we have; she doesn't want to spend that much, but wants a good knife with a similar heft and "feel").

And, our toaster-oven just died...(kitchen implements...worse than cameras, but lots of fun watching one's significant other deal with GAS for a change!) :D


- Barrett
Barrett, You are welcome....It's the carbon steel the Dexter knives are made from that makes them work like magic and sharpen so well.Once you try one you will never use anything else.Also made in massachusetts.In my opinion they put Westhof knives to shame.
Paul



Paul

JohnTF
08-27-2008, 21:26
Wenger is a division of Victorinox. Victorinox bought them out in 2005

http://www.wenger.ch/knife/Company/History/History.html

See, I told you Victorinox was better, I hope they improved the Wengers.

Do they use the Wenger name?

I just stopped looking at the Wengers many years ago, I thought the quality difference was huge.

I bought my last few in Prague when the dollar was better to the Crown, and in a post 9/11 environment, I feel slightly put out when they make me put my money clip with the 3/4" blade in my suitcase, which seems to eat things that size. I got to the gate in Prague with the "Champ" model clipped to my belt, told security when I noticed it, who let it go through xray to see if his friend would find it, then put it in a large envelope at the gate, with my name on it, and it arrived in its own tub in NY. They took far better care of it than my luggage.

They had another good one with a leather case and key chain with a lcd so I could find the key hole in foreign apartments in the dark.

Czechs make good kitchen and table knives, I had to buy several sets as my friends kept claiming them from me in Paris and here. Actually, they look like good copies of Swiss knives I have seen, but they have a good thickness, and seem to hold up rather well.

They also had some pre-revolution great stainless developing tongs that just would not rust and had just the right tension to avoid marks. Low cost and great.

I tried to get Roger to put together a group to buy the Neobrom factory in Brno, they had a huge variety of great papers, from Carton Weight Chamois, to Silver Iodide contact paper, and photo linen. I imported 5000 sheets custom coated and shipped by air. Factory is probably still sitting there if RFF wants its own brand. ;-)

Regards,
John

radiocemetery
08-29-2008, 19:33
I would miss from the USA: sweet corn, Blues music and it's artists, Snap-On hand tools, and WWHP radio station, wide open spaces, and my farm girl wife.

from Japan: Gran Turismo IV and V (if it ever gets released), Samurai Jack, Takumars.

from the EU: Ducati, London, Stilton cheese, Owd Roger, Sauna in Finland.

PS: WWHP can be heard here:

http://www.wwhp.com/

Steve

charjohncarter
08-30-2008, 10:05
From the US: Allen-Edmonds Shoes, Kodak Films and Developers (maybe not made in the US now), Gibson Guitars, Ernie Ball Guitar Strings, Fender amps, Tabasco Sauce.

From EU: Donegal Tweed, Ilford film, I used to want a Ducati but gave up on that, Leica stuff, Discs by Christopher Hogwood.

I know that isn't exactly what was asked, but those are things I like from both places and seconds won't do.

Beemermark
08-31-2008, 20:27
Parts for my BMW motorcycles! Egads, how would I keep 3 running.

Roger Hicks
08-31-2008, 23:53
A really silly one

Reynolds' Cut-Rite wax paper.

We stock up on this each time we visit the US.

Cheers,

R.

Paul T.
09-01-2008, 01:09
I"m all for keeping the transatlantic trade burgeoning, sitting here in me Levi's with an old Epiphone sitting next to me and a pile of Tri X on the mantelpiece.

But I'd also like to extend a digit all the owners of legendary US and Euro marques who've trashed the brand to bring in a little more $$$. like Converse, now made by sweatshop labor, or Bass Weejuns, the cool cat's staple that have plummeted in quality and reputation since they moved production overseas. And any Brit will know about M&S underwear - once legendary, now their socks and boxer shorts fall apart after a few months like any other cheap crap.

And worst of all, Belstaff, the archetypal biking jacket, the one with a Union Jack on the label - which is now being made in italy and turned into an effete fashion item with a pricetag to match. The last place you'll see them today is in a motorbike shop.

Roger Hicks
09-01-2008, 02:00
I"m all for keeping the transatlantic trade burgeoning, sitting here in me Levi's with an old Epiphone sitting next to me and a pile of Tri X on the mantelpiece.

But I'd also like to extend a digit all the owners of legendary US and Euro marques who've trashed the brand to bring in a little more $$$. like Converse, now made by sweatshop labor, or Bass Weejuns, the cool cat's staple that have plummeted in quality and reputation since they moved production overseas. And any Brit will know about M&S underwear - once legendary, now their socks and boxer shorts fall apart after a few months like any other cheap crap.

And worst of all, Belstaff, the archetypal biking jacket, the one with a Union Jack on the label - which is now being made in italy and turned into an effete fashion item with a pricetag to match. The last place you'll see them today is in a motorbike shop.

Dear Paul,

Belstaff? Heresy! Burn the buggers at the stake! (The wax should help),

M+S: yes. Egyptian cotton is one thing. Chinese is quite another.

What depresses me is how hard it can be to buy a half-decent product at a fair price, when the manufacturer wants to sell you rubbish, cheap. I've just had a new sink put in. The bottle-trap was silly-cheap (under 4 euros). Then I had to install another, at the same price, because the first was so bad (= leaked). For 8 euros I could have bought a top-quality bottle-trap -- IF anyone made them...

Likewise, the 700-quid 'reconditioned' gearbox (8 months old) for my Series III now needs a lot of work. I'd cheerfully have paid 1000 or more IF the damn' thing had been reliable, not lease because it was several hundred quid more to install it. But more and more, prices are set by the bottom end, not the top.

Thus, instead of saying, "Kobayashi-san is brilliant for working out how to make very good RF cameras for a quarter of the price of a Leica, even though they aren't as good," people say, "A Leica costs four times as much as a Voigtländer, so a Leica is too expensive."

Cheers,

R.

photovdz
09-01-2008, 09:26
about knifes... I prefer Patadas from Sardinia... or Nogent's, or Bielles (France) made canifs... (ever heard about a Mongin ?)...
But i know a guy in Brussels who makes wonderfull knifes, too...

The problem is not provenance but quality, I'm sure that all over the world there are unbranded unknown perfect products... for food, clothes, daily life...

Roger Hicks
09-01-2008, 10:20
The problem is not provenance but quality, I'm sure that all over the world there are unbranded unknown perfect products... for food, clothes, daily life...

True. I have superb knives from Tibet (old) and Crete (bought from the cutler).

Cheers,

R.

photovdz
09-01-2008, 10:26
local knifes for local ham...

S.

Roger Hicks
09-01-2008, 10:36
local knifes for local ham...

S.

Dear S.

Hmmmm...

Have to start looking for cutlers in the Pyrenees (where I buy my ham nowadays).

Cheers,

R.

anglophone1
09-04-2008, 08:17
Dogs from Ireland?
Clive

Roger Hicks
09-04-2008, 10:13
Dear Clive,

Quite possibly...

Cheers,

R.

photovdz
09-04-2008, 10:54
dogs from the pyrenean...
for pyrenean knifes, go south of the mountain...

S.

fefe
09-08-2008, 06:35
When I moved to the US what I was missing the most was:
-european style pork based products like ham/chorizo/saucisson/mergez and other "charcuterie"
-european cheeses
-european wines even though you can find good red ones made in USA go find a good fendant or a good rose or good gewurtz without importing it from europe.
-did I talk about bred and pastries ?
-strong alcohols: armagnac, cognac, calvados, distillated fruits alcohols
-hard apple/pear cider from Normandy or Britanny

And a lot more in the food and boose category. For the rest I could live with asia/usa made products, and thankfully most of the products listed above are available in the USA in good food stores (who said new seasons?:)