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View Full Version : Shutter Release Problem - Please Chime In


Sean Reid
04-09-2005, 15:56
I'd love to hear from other R-D1 owners about the following:

From time to time (much more often recently) I've found that my shutter release will not trip the shutter even after the advance has been fully cocked. Until today, when this had happened I had been, out of film camera habit, moving the advance lever through its arc a second time. That always seemed to fix the problem (an illusion and coincidence, I now think). Today I discovered a pattern that seemed to point to a problem unrelated to the shutter cocking lever.

The problem does not ever seem to occur when the LCD is folded in (unless the battery is near dead but I'll ignore that exception for obvious reasons). If the LCD is folded out, this problem will sometimes occur even if that LCD is turned off. I discovered today that the solution is to simply release the shutter and press it again (even if the LCD has been off for some time prior to the first shutter press).

First, I think Epson should modify the camera (by firmware if possible) so that a single press of the shutter release not only turns off the LCD (when its on) but also releases the shutter. This is the norm on DSLRs and there's no good reason for needing a double press. It seems to me that my unit is sometimes sending an "LCD on" message to the brain unit responsible for the shutter release *even when the LCD is off*. A loose wire? A bad connection? Dunno yet. Before I bring this problem to Epson I wanted to find out who else (if anyone) is experiencing it.

If you own an R-D1 and can spare a free moment, would you please test your camera to see if it displays this behavior. A friend of mine is currently testing a review unit from Epson and that unit seems to be behaving similarly. I suspect that there could be something amiss in the wires that go from the moveable LCD unit to the body. Might they be fragile?

Along with your response, please indicate approx. serial number and approx. number of exposures made by the camera so far.

Thanks,

Sean

driggett
04-09-2005, 16:19
Sean,
No problems with mine. The only time when I have to press again or wait is when the lcd is on or I have shot two frames in rapid succession and I have to wait for it to write.
Serial 192x
No frames approx 500.
Cheers,
Chris

Sean Reid
04-09-2005, 16:25
Good to hear. That suggests that either:

1) They don't all do it

or

2) The problem develops with "higher mileage" units like the press unit and my own (which has just under 5000 exposures)

Thanks, keep m' coming.

Cheers,

Sean

Ed Schwartzreic
04-09-2005, 16:34
I have had this problem occasionally, but it is not frequent enough to pinpoint a cause. I usually decide that the display was on even though I thought it was likely off. A seoond press of the shutter usually fires it.

Ed

oldheader
04-09-2005, 16:42
My R-D1 (001837) works as follows. When the LCD is folded out (but still flush with camera back) and turned on it takes two shutter presses, the first turns the LCD off and the second actuates the shutter. I agree a single press for both would be better. I also tried it with the LCD folded out to 90 deg positions with the same result. When the LCD is off and in any position I never experienced the double press anomally.
I did find that if you leave the LCD on and fold it back to closed it turns off automatically when it is about half way rotated. This indicates there is position sensing switch of some kind. Could your's be staying on when closed some how? (unlikely)

Sean Reid
04-09-2005, 16:51
Hi oldheader,

I don't think my LCD is staying on because this shutter release problem doesn't occur with the LCD folded in. It seems to be a matter of the shutter release behaving as if the LCD was on even when it isn't. How many exposures on your camera?

Hi Ed,

I used to dismiss the problem too but when my friend George mentioned it to me I started paying more attention to it. How many exposures on your camera?

Thanks,

Sean

oldheader
04-09-2005, 17:08
Sean,

My R-D1 001837 has less than 200 exposures.

didjiman
04-09-2005, 17:40
Sean, my first unit, which took over 2000 pics, I think exhibited this behavior, as does the 3rd one, which I took ~500 pics and just sent back for the Vertical RF problem. It's becoming 2nd nature to me to tab the shutter a couple times now and then.

If the 4th one comes in with any problem, I am going to ask for a refund :-(
// richard

Sean Reid
04-09-2005, 17:58
didjiman,

Thanks for the post. We shouldn't have to be working around a possible defect like that. I'll hear from as many people as post this weekend and then get on with Epson Monday. I hadn't noticed the problem so much because I don't use the histogram very often. But since my friend George brought it to my attention, I see that my example does indeed have a problem.

Cheers,

Sean

DaShiv
04-09-2005, 18:10
Mine doesn't display this problem -- I'm at a bit over 1k in shutter actuations.

David Kieltyka
04-09-2005, 18:16
Sean, my R-D1 has always behaved as you describe. Sometimes, not often, when the LCD has recently been active the camera just isn't ready for the next shot. Tapping the shutter release puts it right again. I suspect it's a firmware issue, maybe a timing thing, rather than an electronic problem. IMO the camera should always be in shot priority mode. As soon as it senses the shutter release being pressed it should drop whatever else it might be doing and prepare for a capture.

-Dave-

Sean Reid
04-09-2005, 18:20
Exactly. As I hear back more people perhaps I'll figure how widespread this behavior is.

Cheers Dave,

Sean

Charles D. Orze
04-09-2005, 19:38
Hi Sean,

Thanks for the reviews on Luminous Landscape. My release works exactly as you describe--seems to be a design feature!?

Best,

Charlie Orzech

jlw
04-09-2005, 20:44
Sean --

Let me make sure I understand the cases involved in this:

-- LCD folded out and turned on: first shutter press turns off LCD; second press fires shutter. (This is how mine behaves.)

-- LCD folded out but not turned on: first press does nothing (turning "off" the LCD that was already off?); second press fires shutter.

-- LCD folded in: first press fires shutter (this is how mine behaves.)

I think we all agree that the first and third cases are designed-in behaviors, whether we like them or not, as everyone's R-D 1 seems to work that way.

It's the second case that is weird. I haven't experienced it (I'd guess my camera is getting on to about 4,000 exposures, but it could be more) but I think we need to pin it down a bit more:

-- Does this happen when you have folded out the LCD but NEVER turned it on with the button?

-- Does it happen after you have had the LCD folded out, turned it on with the button, then turned it off by pressing the shutter release once?

-- Does it happen after you have had the LCD folded out, turned it on with the button, and then turned it off with the button?

-- Or does the LCD eventually "time-out" by itself? I haven't been able to produce this behavior yet, but if it does, I am guessing it might be caused by the whole camera going into power-save mode -- which, as we've all learned the hard way, requires one press of the shutter release (or cycling the power switch) to wake it up, and then a second press to release the shutter.

I have been sitting here fiddling with my R-D 1 as I type this, and haven't been able to produce any non-standard behavior. But as you say, this is an intermittent problem, and those are always the hardest to troubleshoot!

(Another thought: Does this behavior occur regardless of the battery's state of charge? If the battery is close the flat, the LCD might drain it enough to make it shut off; then, after some recovery time, the battery would again have enough power to make an exposure, but you'd still need two presses because the camera's CPU still registers the LCD as on.)

LCT
04-10-2005, 00:01
... Let me make sure I understand the cases involved in this:
1) LCD folded out and turned on: first shutter press turns off LCD; second press fires shutter. (This is how mine behaves.)
2) LCD folded out but not turned on: first press does nothing (turning "off" the LCD that was already off?); second press fires shutter.
3) LCD folded in: first press fires shutter (this is how mine behaves.)
I think we all agree that the first and third cases are designed-in behaviors...
It's the second case that is weird...

Never experienced the second case so far: first press fires shutter.
Serial # 0015xx, about 1600 shots.
Best,
LCT

Gid
04-10-2005, 01:17
Hi Sean,

There was a post on this somewhere else - may have been dpreveiw epson forum. However, here's the thing. If you've reveiwed an image on the LCD and dont switch off the LCD using the menu button, then, what you describe happens consistently i.e. double shutter press required. Switch off the LCD using the menu button and always a single shutter press. Since I picked this up, I have had no problems when I follow this procedure. However, I do still forget and when I do, guess what - two presses required. It should be fixed so that this doesn't happen, but there's the workaround. Hope this helps.

Regards

Gid

vincenzo
04-10-2005, 02:07
Im used to the pressing the shutter twice after a screen review now, but it would definitely be better if Epson fixed it by firmware as per Seans suggestion. I have missed a few good shots due to forgetting the need to press twice. I hope it doesn't take Epson long to do something about this.

Jim Watts
04-10-2005, 02:18
Serial Number 24xx, Exposures approx 1,000.
I have had the problem occassionally but as Ed says its intermitant and I am not sure I have not been able to identify the cause.
Normally mine behaves as follows (from jlw):
-- LCD folded out and turned on: first shutter press turns off LCD; second press fires shutter. (This is how mine behaves as long as I have remembered to cock the shutter after viewing on LCD).
-- LCD folded out but not turned on: first press fires shutter.
-- LCD folded in: first press fires shutter

I think that the intermiitant problem has ony occured for me when the camera has come out of "sleep" mode when it sometimes takes perhaps a bit longer to wake up than I expect. Normally I tap the shutter as I am bringing it up to my eye and its ready (I have timed this and its less than two seconds in most cases) but on the odd occassion it takes two or three presses before it fires.

I will try some more detailed tests along jlw lines to try and pin point it.

Ed Schwartzreic
04-10-2005, 03:34
Sean,

I have about 2500 exposures on #001064. I've noticed the problem all along, though.

Ed

Sean Reid
04-10-2005, 04:10
"-- LCD folded out and turned on: first shutter press turns off LCD; second press fires shutter. (This is how mine behaves.)"

Right, normal behavior

"-- LCD folded out but not turned on: first press does nothing (turning "off" the LCD that was already off?); second press fires shutter."

Right, strange behavior.

"-- LCD folded in: first press fires shutter (this is how mine behaves.)"

Right, normal behavior.

"I think we all agree that the first and third cases are designed-in behaviors, whether we like them or not, as everyone's R-D 1 seems to work that way."

Right

"It's the second case that is weird. I haven't experienced it (I'd guess my camera is getting on to about 4,000 exposures, but it could be more) but I think we need to pin it down a bit more."

We have guests coming today and I'm currently recharging the R-D1 batteries but as soon as time allows, I'll try to do some more specific tests to isolate this problem further.


"-- Or does the LCD eventually "time-out" by itself? I haven't been able to produce this behavior yet, but if it does, I am guessing it might be caused by the whole camera going into power-save mode -- which, as we've all learned the hard way, requires one press of the shutter release (or cycling the power switch) to wake it up, and then a second press to release the shutter."

When the camera goes into sleep mode, the various dials all go to their null positions. That isn't the case when this happens.

"(Another thought: Does this behavior occur regardless of the battery's state of charge? If the battery is close the flat, the LCD might drain it enough to make it shut off; then, after some recovery time, the battery would again have enough power to make an exposure, but you'd still need two presses because the camera's CPU still registers the LCD as on.)[/QUOTE]"

Yes, regardless of battery state. Like any camera, the R-D1 can get flaky when the batt is low but this does not seem to be connected to that.

Cheers,

Sean

Sean Reid
04-10-2005, 04:13
Hi Sean,

Thanks for the reviews on Luminous Landscape.

You're welcome, glad that you enjoyed them.

Cheers,

Sean

Sean Reid
04-10-2005, 04:17
Hi Sean,

There was a post on this somewhere else - may have been dpreveiw epson forum. However, here's the thing. If you've reveiwed an image on the LCD and dont switch off the LCD using the menu button, then, what you describe happens consistently i.e. double shutter press required. Switch off the LCD using the menu button and always a single shutter press. Since I picked this up, I have had no problems when I follow this procedure. However, I do still forget and when I do, guess what - two presses required. It should be fixed so that this doesn't happen, but there's the workaround. Hope this helps.

Regards

Gid

OK, when I get a charged battery I'll try and see if that's the case with mine. Thanks.

Cheers,

Sean

chametzoo
04-10-2005, 06:51
Sean...My experience was the same as GLD's above and have read as much in other forums. It's something Epson missed in design. My serial number was about 18xx (camera was returned for focusing reasons.) Michael

DanielT
04-10-2005, 08:15
Hi Sean, I have the same problem with the shutter (serial number is 0021xx and the number of exposures is 3520)

Daniel

driggett
04-10-2005, 08:31
I am wondering because of all my other problems that this wont happen to me once my exposure gets up there. Let's see now we have the following defects for this camera.
RF out of alignment
Drunken frame lines
Hot/Bad pixels in ccd
Hot/bad pixels in lcd
shutter button problems

That's 5 major problems so fat. I wonder what is next. Will this is the first camera of it's type. When I was talking to the APS guy on Friday he said that they may some guidelines on what is a defect and what is not. I told him that would be fine if this was a cheap camera but a $3000 camera is not acceptable. I said that they put $2400 dollars worth of electronics in a $600 camera body. To me that like putting a porsche engine in a vw bug.
Cheers,
Chris

David Kieltyka
04-10-2005, 08:51
Chris, I doubt the issue Sean describes has anything to do with the number of exposures you've taken. I had it happen the first time I put the camera on a tripod. In fact I've never had it happen unless I've had the camera on a tripod, since otherwise I tend to ignore the LCD screen when I'm taking pics.

I don't think it has anything to do with the screen being physically in the out position, except this means you've probably been using it. It's the use of the screen that results in the problem occuring. I do think it's a firmware thing and that every R-D1 made to date manifests the problem under the "right" conditions. Like Sean says the camera appears to be awake--the LCD screen is off but the dials are all active--but when you press the shutter button rather than taking a photo you wake up the camera from some intermediate sleep state. It's the same behavior as when the RAW buffer is full and you press the shutter. Except in this case the buffer isn't full.

All part of the fun we users of a first-generation product get to enjoy.

-Dave-

SimonPJ
04-10-2005, 11:29
(Hello. I'm newly registered to this useful and interesting forum.)

I have experienced this problem with each of the two R-D1's that I have had. The one I'm now using is #3530 with about 3000 exposures on it.

I haven't done systematic testing to work out the exact camera condition when it happens, as it always happens in the heat of shooting and I just stab away at the release until it goes. Sometimes, of course, what I'm experiencing is the fact that the LCD was on (but not often, because I rarely use it) or that the buffer is full, which happens far more often.

But I definitely do experience something with the shutter release that has seemed to me like a computer hanging. Sometimes it simply requires a second stab at the release (as if the LCD was on), and sometimes I have to wait a few seconds before the shutter releases again (as if the buffer was full). Sometimes it has seemed well and truly stuck and I switch off and back on again to clear it up.

I do find this quite a serious problem. Combined with buffer-related shutter delays it means that the R-D1 is very far from having the moment-capturing ability associated with rangefinders. I console myself with the fact that I do shoot far more frames than I would with film, raising the moment-capturing odds that way.

My second R-D1 has experienced no other problems. It focuses well with a very wide range of lenses, both long and short, and the rangefinder patch has remained properly aligned.

My first R-D1 had a problem that I haven't seen reported elsewhere. After about 1000 exposures about one in four exposures were blank (black).

(Apart from the shutter release problem the only thing that I have become increasingly aware of is the limitated dynamic range when shooting at higher ISO's. I'm often frustrated by noisy shadows when shooting people from the dark side in dim interiors. Exposing for the shadows results in ugly blown out highlights with that nasty digital bleeding halo. At first I thought the R-D1 was doing better than film in those circumstances, but now I can see that the forgiving range of my habitual Fuji Press 800 works better for me.)

Simon PJ

Sean Reid
04-10-2005, 12:07
Guests just left, haven't done the tests yet but regarding dynamic range (which is similar to most DSLRs):

1. Consider trying some of the older, lower contrast lenses from Canon, Leica, etc. This option is not as easily available for DSLRs.

2. In RAW conversion in PhotoRAW, try changing the black and white points so that they don't clip so early. The default settings clip both ends of the tonal scale quite noticeably. Sometimes just moving those black and white points can recover a suprising amount of detail on either end (or both).

In my notes to the PhotoRAW team, I've asked them to consider modifying the program so that one can specify settings before batching (as opposed to the camera just picking up the tags from the in-camera settings). One could have a default set of black and white point settings for various lenses to maximize the dynamic range of each. For example, I'm about to start working again on a set of files made with the (superb) Nokton 50/1.5 in very contrasty sunlight. On my current frame I have the white point set to -12 and the black point set to -19. It varies from frame to frame but one could choose default settings for a given lens and apply them for the initial batch conversions.

I'll report back on my shutter tests later on.

Cheers,

Sean

SimonPJ
04-10-2005, 12:49
Thanks Sean. Just followed your advice with the Epson Raw programme. I hadn't noticed how much was being clipped on some images - and how much can be brought back with the black and white points.

Now I'll get on with working out how much improvement that can make.

Sean Reid
04-10-2005, 14:06
Hi Simon,

It's easy to miss because they have it under the "special" menu with the vignetting settings. This makes little sense and I suspect that they only put it there because it fit. I'll bet a lot of people haven't played with it. It belongs in the same family as the contrast, etc. controls. It is indeed quite surprising to see how more more range is actually in the RAW files than what the default settings deliver. It's also yet another good reason to use RAW. Curious to read how you make out.

Cheers,

Sean

pfogle
04-10-2005, 15:31
Hi, re the 'shutter problem'

Quote: 'When the camera goes into sleep mode, the various dials all go to their null positions. That isn't the case when this happens.'

that isn't what happens on my camera... I've set the sleep timer to 3 mins, and at that time, the *battery* meter goes to E but the others stay in position. I haven't timed when they go to zero, it may be after 30mins.

So you can easliy be fooled into thinking the camera's on, when in fact it is in sleep mode, and will need the 'double press'. The only clue is the battery meter, and you don't get the shutter indicator in the v/f.

cheers
Phil

Bruce H. Dorn
04-10-2005, 16:11
Hi Sean,

Mine has done this since new. So much for the decisive moment...

Bruce

Sean Reid
04-10-2005, 16:42
Hi Phil,

Perhaps I remembered incorrectly about the what the dials do during sleep mode. I don't think that the sleep mode is causing the problem for me. I have it set to 20 mins and almost never go that long between exposures when I'm shooting. Therefore, I almost never experience it. I'd rather pack extra batteries than miss a shot while my camera wakes up.

Hi Bruce,

Welcome. For those who may not know Bruce, he is a very talented and well-respected wedding photographer. I have no problem at all with shutter response when the LCD is folded in. Since I work that way (LCD folded in) most of the time, it wasn't until two things overlapped that I became aware of how often this strange shutter behavior was happening:

1. George Weir discussed the problem he's having (in this respect) with the review R-D1

2. As part of my lens testing, I've been babysitting the histogram much more than I usually do with this camera esp. since lenses like the Leica Asphs run can run so hot in the highlights.

Tonight, I seem to be in a "cannot replicate" situation. The camera is behaving itself. It most certainly was not behaving itself all the time yesterday and I'm trying to figure this out. If Epson can implement a one-touch LCD cancel/shutter release that might be best. Meanwhile I'm going to keep trying to isolate the conditions that this occurs under.

As for HCB's decisive moment, we can get it consistently just as he did. That is to say - sans histogram. Many aspects of this camera encourage one to just ignore that histogram and work from one's internal mental meter in combination with AE mode. Then again, when one is shooting unrepeatable events, for pay, as you and I are, the histogram does provide a margin of comfort.

Cheers,

Sean

pfogle
04-11-2005, 00:42
Sean,
interesting that your results are not consistent - it sure sounds like a programming bug to me - some routine where they've forgotten to put in a 'clear' or something. So perhaps we should petition Epson to get on with a firmware update.

Like others here, I've experienced this intermittently, but assumed it we me rather than the camera. Right now I can't get it to happen.

Last question - has anyone seen this problem for sure, after turning off the LCD using the display button on the back? Does it sometimes happen (as suggested in Simon's post) in the middle of a sequence of shots where the LCD hasn't been used at all? If so, is it only after a delay?

cheers
Phil

Jim Watts
04-11-2005, 02:29
I had the problem occur again yesterday while shooting, but as I was involved with the subject I didn't have time to try a diagnosis. Unfortunately this is usually the case. My normal reaction is to stab away at the shutter untill it works so I can continue shooting as quickley as possible. I think I had LCD open and had checked the Histogram on it a few shots back.

I have tried a few configurations today with a paticular emphasis on shooting with the LCD out and then turning on with the Display button and then off with either the Display button or First press on the shutter button to see if this has a bearing.
i.e.
1. Turn display on with display button. Turn off with same button. Fire 10 shots.
2.Turn display on with display button. Turn off with first press of shutter button. Fire 10 shots.
but no reoccurrance today. Perhaps this is a special (unwanted) Easter Egg in the Epson Firmware. :bang:

DaShiv
04-11-2005, 02:40
That reminds me, Sean -- glad to see you're doing contrast testing on the fast lenses, since I'm curious to see which fast and low-contrast options are out there. I love the 35 'lux ASPH but I do find myself dialing a little bit of -EC to protect highlights at times, especially outdoors. I'm waiting to see if the VC 40/1.4 or similar alternatives might work better under high contrast conditions.

Jim Watts
04-11-2005, 05:34
I have now found one way to make the shutter release problem occur. I have found that there are two Power Saving levels on the R-D1. "Light Sleep" & "Deep Sleep".
"Light Sleep" is as set by the user i.e. 3, 5, 10 or 20 mins. In "Light Sleep" on the indicator dial only the battery needle returns to the small white (off) triangle, the other settings and number of exposures remain as last set by the user.
"Deep Sleep" occurs after 30 minutes and is independant of the user setting. In "Deep Sleep" all indicator needles return to the small white (off) triangles and the number of exposures reads E (empty). This is the same as if the camera was switched off.

From "Light Sleep" the camera takes only about one second to respond after the first tap on the shutter button. From "Deep Sleep" it takes nearly 5 seconds no matter how many times you press the shutter release before the shutter will fire.

I am not sure that this agrees with Sean's experience but its worth carefully thinking about how long ago it was when you last touched the release if the problem occures.

I will try to remember to keep retapping mine within 30 minutes in future so that it only takes the Light nap.

Sean Reid
04-11-2005, 05:54
Hi Jim,

That's an interesting discovery and that explains why I had remembered sleep mode as all the needles going to the null position. Generally, my camera only goes into sleep mode when I put it in my bag without remembering to turn it off. I take it out and the needles look as they would if the camera was off...but it isn't....it's in the "deep sleep" mode you've just coined.

Unfortunately, it doesn't relate to my shutter problem. I'll see if I can isolate it today as time allows.

Cheers,

Sean

Jim Watts
04-11-2005, 06:05
Sean,
Yes as you have a 20 min. user setting (I usually have mine set at 5 mins)you would probably miss the change in the Null position after 30 mins. Sorry that this does not seem to be the answer in your case. I will also keep checking to see if it occurs outside of this power mode.

mtokue
04-11-2005, 06:28
Sean,
I have been following this thread for a couple of days and I too am in the"cannot replicate"
situation, But I must admit that when I first read your post , I remember thinking hey! thats happened to me as well.... But alas since then It hasn't occured.
A by product of keeping an eye out for this is that I have noticed that of the three SD cards that I use most often ( Two are SanDisk UltraII 512mb one is a Lexar HS 512mb) one of the SanDisk is either in need of a deep format or is on its way out because it takes much longer to write to that disk. The red led seems to be on for a good three seconds with that disk.
which necessitates a rather long pause. between shots.
I will let you know if I suceed to replicate the shutter problem.
Mike.

ian_watts
04-11-2005, 08:59
You can count me in amongst those experiencing this issue. I've missed a number of shots because of this since I've had this camera and it is probably my number one bugbear with the RD-1. I always assumed that it was because I'd either left the LCD on or that the camera had gone into sleep mode (though like Sean I have mine set to 20 mins).

driggett
04-13-2005, 22:49
No problems with my 4th camera. My last three cameras were in a 9 value range from 192x to 193x.
Cheers,
Chris

pfogle
04-14-2005, 01:01
As a specs wearer, I recently changed to using the diopter correction lens. Two things - one is that the 'clarity' focusing is not now quite so apparent, though it still works. My left eye, now OOF sometimes wanders about a bit, so I see a double image rather than one clear one. However, it's still very usable.

Second, and I think more relevant here, is that I can now see the shutter speed indicator much more reliably. It's really quite hard to see it with specs on. So now at least I know if the camera's asleep, and can do the 'second press'.

This doesn't solve the problem, but at least now I'm not being caught by surprise so much.
cheers
Phil

Jim Watts
05-10-2005, 08:05
Sean,
Since you replaced your previous generic batteries with the Sterlingtek batteries are you still experiencing the same amount of shutter problems? The reason I ask is that while doing quite a few tests to determine the best adapters to use with various lenses on the R-D1 I found that when close to the point that the battery died (I was using the LCD a lot) I experienced quite a few misfires. Two to three presses before fireing. New battery inserted no problem. You had noted in the Battery thread that your batteries at that time were draining more quickly and probably faulty.

dmihajlo
05-10-2005, 08:28
Sean,

my RD-1 (bought in Japan, August 2004, serial approx. 0...0177) has more than 7500 exposures and does not show the problem you describe (although it shows all other more "common" RD-1 problems...).

The only shutter problems I witnessed are super long exposures when battery nearly empty (the shutter is left open until the battery is removed or goes dead...)

Regards

Dragan, Switzerland

Sean Reid
05-10-2005, 13:21
I'm fairly sure I've run into the problem with the Epson batteries but I shot a wedding on 4/30 with the Epson and Sterlingtek batteries and didn't seem to notice the problem very often. Maybe I'm subconciously pre-tripping the shutter. I made about 600 pictures with the R-D1 that day and when I'm working like that, I don't notice much about the camera unless there's a problem. What I'm noticing mostly is that I need two more R-D1 bodies.

Thanks for the suggestions.

Sean

MIKIRO
05-11-2005, 06:33
Sean,

The camera gets asleep after you leave it for a couple or minutes, whether the LCD is folded in or out. The first press wakes the camera up; the second fires the shutter. Is this what you descirbe? It has always occurred on mine. #0003xx, 15K exposures.

Cheers,

MIKIRO

Sean Reid
05-11-2005, 09:37
Sean,

The camera gets asleep after you leave it for a couple or minutes, whether the LCD is folded in or out. The first press wakes the camera up; the second fires the shutter. Is this what you descirbe? It has always occurred on mine. #0003xx, 15K exposures.

Cheers,

MIKIRO

Hi Mikiro,

No, this is a different issue but thanks for the suggestion.

Cheers,

Sean

MIKIRO
05-13-2005, 05:26
Sorry, Sean. My previous post was redundant. Have you already solved the problem with Epson? I called Epson Japan today and asked if they know anything about such problems. The person in charge did some research and called me back. They donít. They do not know either the issue of light and deep modes of sleep, which I have yet to confirm on mine.

Cheers,

MIKIRO

Sean Reid
05-13-2005, 11:32
If I had a solid diagnosis on the conditions under which the problem occurs I'd start working with Epson USA to get it solved. As it is now, it only seems to happen when I'm making a lot of pictures (and in the midst of more important priorities, therefore). I don't recall missing many frames recently because of it. I think I may have trained myself to press the shutter release down partway once after each wind of the shutter cocking lever.
Hard to say...when I'm in the midst of intense work, I don't think about the camera much (per se).

Cheers,

Sean

andrewch
07-24-2005, 06:44
I had another attack of the "dead shutter" problem today. The shooting was fine when I was on the first battery (I have 3, one Epson and two generics). But after I inserted the second battery (a generic), the shutter suddenly became unresponsive after a sequence of 6-7 shots. It returned to normal after I switched the camera off for a few minutes. However, the shutter died again after a sequence of a few shots in quick succession.But this time, it did not recover even after I turned it on and off half a dozen times and left it off for 15 minutes. According to the battery gauge, the battery was half full, and I was very sure it was not in sleep mode. It suddenly dawned on me that a couple of fellow users complained that the shutter problem get progressively worse with mileage, and it might be caused by the "aging" of the battery. I inserted the 3rd battery, and the camera immediately returned to normal.


I am not very knowlegeable about batteries. Most generic battery are the 1.3 volt varieties. Is it possible that after successive charging, their ability to maintain the correct voltage after successive shots get progressively worse and therefore causing the shutter to hang?

brightsky
07-24-2005, 11:48
Sean,

Increment your counter again. I've experienced the shutter not firing also, but as a regular M user I guess I just didn't think too much about it, recocked the shutter, and it fired perfectly the second time. I did not pay any attention or shall I state, notice a pattern. I will carefully watch for the cirumstances under which this occurs and report back.

My serial # is 19xx and count is approximately 100+/- a few.

I'd also like to thank you for the terrific and detailed review on LL.

CM

greggebhardt
07-24-2005, 14:57
My serial number 45xx has not failed to fire with the LCD off

Sean Reid
07-25-2005, 03:56
Sean,

Increment your counter again. I've experienced the shutter not firing also, but as a regular M user I guess I just didn't think too much about it, recocked the shutter, and it fired perfectly the second time. I did not pay any attention or shall I state, notice a pattern. I will carefully watch for the cirumstances under which this occurs and report back.

My serial # is 19xx and count is approximately 100+/- a few.

I'd also like to thank you for the terrific and detailed review on LL.

CM

You're very welcome. I find that I still experience this shutter behavior sometimes with the LCD out (and switched off) even with a well-charged battery. It's become habitual for me now to do a half-press of the shutter release before tripping the shutter (if the LCD is swung out).

Cheers,

Sean

Larry Kellogg
07-25-2005, 18:56
I'm still experiencing some intermittent shutter problems when I use a soft release. Sometimes, the soft release turns freely, and in certain positions the shutter is locked completely so that you can't press the button at all. I wonder if something is broken inside of my shutter switch. Has anyone else experienced this problem with either a cable release or a soft release? Today, I took the softie off and the problem doesn't seem to occur, but I would much rather shoot with the softie. I find that I have to use the tip of my finger to shoot the regular shutter button.

Larry

Donald Mann
07-26-2005, 15:54
My Camera is 1983 (not 1984). Approx 1200 exposures. I read Sean's post with interest. My shutter does stick from time to time. I tried to test Sean's theory and the damn thing performed flawlessly! I will continue to test and report back. :confused:

brightsky
07-26-2005, 17:02
Update: Used my camera today (19xx) with the LCD folded inside. My #1 Epson battery wore down to empty and I replaced it with fully charged #2 Epson battery. At no time did the shuttere stick, despite a low battery conditon and I fired a few frames of nothing just to ascertain if it would stick with the battery almost drained.

Tomorrow I'll test it with the LCD screen out and see if I can recreate the problem.

At least with my R-D1, the problem does not seem battery related, at least with the Epson batteries.

CM

RML
07-26-2005, 21:29
I, too, experienced some sticky shutter in the last two weeks. Every time it was related to a single third-party battery almost being empty. Dr Yao provided me with 2 Techstep 1600 mAh batteries, at least one of which seems to cause some sticky shutter when the dial indicates it being nearly empty (the other battery doesn't show any problems).

I solved the stickyness easily every time by shutting down the camera, taking out the battery, putting it back again, switching on the camera, and changing shutter time. That made the shutter come loose again.

I'm now going to put in a new battery as soon as I experience a sticky shutter. For me it is just one of those things one has to learn to live with.

kepstein
12-10-2005, 14:54
My shutter was stuck today. I noticed that the retaining bezel around the shutter release was loose. I turned it clockwise, then used two toothpicks in the spanner slots to tighten it further, and the shutter now works. I hope this works for others.

Regards,
Ken

I'd love to hear from other R-D1 owners about the following:

From time to time (much more often recently) I've found that my shutter release will not trip the shutter even after the advance has been fully cocked.Sean