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View Full Version : flash, another rff poll


back alley
03-11-2006, 19:37
who uses it?

who would never touch it?

the answers will soon appear...

Stephanie Brim
03-11-2006, 19:41
Never touch it. Not a big fan. Every time I try and use one shots come out horrible. It's probably because I don't know how to shoot with a flash effectively, but I don't really need to with my rangefinder and fast lenses.

peterc
03-11-2006, 19:42
I own flashes, but I use them very rarely. I prefer to try to fit the film to the lighting conditions rather than use flash.

Peter

peterc
03-11-2006, 19:44
And where's the "until the police caught me" option for the REAL flashers. :D

Peter

Todd.Hanz
03-11-2006, 19:50
polls make me feel insecure, I always pick the least popular choice :)

Todd

wlewisiii
03-11-2006, 19:50
I'll use it quite happily. Mostly for fill or held off camera and aimed for bouncing, but like anything else it's a tool Sometimes it's appropriate; many times it's not. When I get a new-to-me classic, the first roll through it always has at least one flash shot to make sure the sync is working correctly.

I won't say I use it terribly often, but when I want it... well, I _want_ it :D But it really is nice to be able to do a bit of fill now and again. Gotta get a decent bounce/swivel head flash and a good softbox for it someday...

William

cp_ste.croix
03-11-2006, 19:57
For me, it's one more thing to get wrong, and I don't particularly like the look flash gives me.

I do like playing with my Crown Graphic flash though...but only to mess with friends, not for photography.

jan normandale
03-11-2006, 20:02
polls make me feel insecure, I always pick the least popular choice :)

Todd

this is the "best-est" quote ever at RFF on polls..

dadsm3
03-11-2006, 20:03
Way too many family functions and portraits I'm expected to record for posterity....always in my bag unless streetshooting.

cp_ste.croix
03-11-2006, 20:27
polls make me feel insecure, I always pick the least popular choice :)

Todd

that's how I feel about voting in elections.

Krasnaya_Zvezda
03-11-2006, 20:33
I use it as a last resort, but if there is no available light, one must provide one's own.
I always liked HCB's comment that use of flash was akin to arriving at the opera with a handgun. That is indeed something I might be accused of doing...

Honus
03-11-2006, 20:37
Available light, all the way. I've never liked the flash.

I commend those that do it well, but I would rather shoot wide open and push like crazy.

Robert

wlewisiii
03-11-2006, 20:38
I always liked HCB's comment that use of flash was akin to arriving at the opera with a handgun

I love the contrast to Weegee (Speed Graphic with an RF... ;) Can't tell you how much he used it... <LOL> ) with his big as*ed flash bulbs for nearly every shot. I think I'm just too freaking Anglican :eek: as I've gotta find a middle way between HCB & Weegee ...

:bang: :bang: :bang:

:angel:

William

Fedzilla_Bob
03-11-2006, 20:41
Some operas deserve a handgun.

I use a Flash now and then. Usually bounced off a wall or cieling.

A long time ago I photgraphed a friends truck at night. I painted it with light using a cheap flash set for its lowest power.

Too bad it was an slr shot. I didn't know about rangefinders then.

amateriat
03-11-2006, 20:49
I grok the idea of flash as a Necessary Evil. I don't likt the usual "look" either, but sometimes it's "either flash or go home", in which case I'll break out the flash and hold my aesthetic nose (although, sometimes, direct flash augments the shot. Maybe because I'm also something of a Les Krims fan).


- Barrett

jan normandale
03-11-2006, 20:55
I always liked HCB's comment that use of flash was akin to arriving at the opera with a handgun. That is indeed something I might be accused of doing...

Handguns .. no!...but what's wrong with showing up with a few vegetables??

Krasnaya_Zvezda
03-11-2006, 21:19
Some operas deserve a handgun.



Would come in handy when some screeching woman is taking too long to die. I have held season tickets to the local opera for years, and more than once I've muttered to myself, "If she doesn't die soon, I'm goin' for the flash, it's loaded..."

dadsm3
03-11-2006, 21:32
Don Giovanni is the best opera death....the statue comes to life and drags him down to hell. Have to love it....

back alley
03-11-2006, 21:41
are you guys trying to 'class' up my poll with all this opera talk?

;)

dadsm3
03-11-2006, 21:47
Sorry, everything becomes a general discussion for me after 1:00am. I'll shutup now.... :o

Silver
03-11-2006, 22:19
First wedding I ever shot I was using a hassy rig with a vivitar 283 converted to a bare bullb parabolic reflector. I hit a guy square in the face candid, and he gave me gried for blinding him and he laid into me. Was one of the coolest shots I got all night though...so I thought.

Leica with flash? I got some nice shots of a black and white english setter on a hardwood floor once. Also shot a high school prom or two, but never leica. That's for the light already there so I say never...yet. I did just buy a vivitar 2800.

laptoprob
03-11-2006, 22:31
If and only if I want to use flash I will be doing it with the CLE. It has the brilliant flash system which I know from the similar SLR's. Sounds silly to trust a computer system on lighting but it really works.
Drawback is the flash is almost bigger than the tiny CLE, but it is powerful and full-featured.

But mostly I prefer available light to capture more atmosphere. That is a big advantage with rangefinder photography. A flash makes the camera very present, people tend to notice the photog too much. In other words, it is harder to blend in and make photos almost unnoticed.

In daylight a little fill-in flash can work miracles too.

cheers, Rob.

franceluxemburg
03-11-2006, 22:35
Yes, i use flash.
I set the outputpower at the minimum level to catch as much as the available light as possible.

J-B

RayPA
03-11-2006, 23:02
I use it only for family photos, record keeping type stuff. I use it almost every time I use my Minilux. It's one of the few things I have control over on a p&s. BTW, I chose the last option.


:)

allthumbs
03-12-2006, 02:07
I always liked HCB's comment that use of flash was akin to arriving at the opera with a handgun.

Is that a good or a bad thing to do?

do you flash?

Only if I'm really, really drunk and there is nothing available that would be more reflective than my bare skin.

On the other hand, if you're talking about small flash units that are typically mounted on-camera, I avoid as much as possible. So much so that I wouldn't even know how to use one if I had to. So I guess the answer works out to "never". They give a distinctive look to a photograph, which in general I do not want, although someday I may want precisely that look, which means I should probably learn how to use one...

Thanks for the question.

oftheherd
03-12-2006, 02:49
Well, I voted sure it's a part of photography. The three choices don't exactely fit for me. I do like available light photography where flash would ruin the "look" of the photo. But of course other times flash is what is going to get you a photo you want. Either because it's too dark otherwise, or because fill is needed. I don't try to use flash all the time either. Just when I think it is needed.

Interesting question though.

oftheherd
03-12-2006, 03:02
Some operas deserve a handgun.

I use a Flash now and then. Usually bounced off a wall or cieling.

A long time ago I photgraphed a friends truck at night. I painted it with light using a cheap flash set for its lowest power.

Too bad it was an slr shot. I didn't know about rangefinders then.

I haven't painted with light in years. I once had to photograph the inside of a burned out church where part of the roof had been burned through or was vented. I went at night, using a tripod, 18mm lens from the balcony, and painted using flash bulbs rather that the 285 or Sunpak 522 I had. Bulbs seem to give a more even and less harsh light. I shot two or three frames to insure I got it right. Lucky because in one I still managed to catch a ghost of myself. I still keep flash bulbs and some tilt-a-mites in case I ever feel the need to do something like that again.

Wayne R. Scott
03-12-2006, 03:04
are you guys trying to 'class' up my poll with all this opera talk?

;)

I think it was Mark Twain that was asked what he thought of the first opera that he attended and he said, "I haven't heard anything like that since the Orphanage burnt down".

No need for a handgun at an opera. My definition of opera: Death by music.

I do use flash off camera and in multiples of up to 5 at a time.

Wayne

danielnorton
03-12-2006, 06:53
More than half of my shoots (especially now in the winter) are lit studio shots, so it's part of my work for sure. I got into rangefinders to shoot available light, but I love to look the RF glass gives me and the feel in my hand of the camera, so I started using RFs for pretty much all my 35mm work.

Now if we are talking on camera flash, I don't use that very much, and when I know I will need to I use my Hexar AF, that flash system works great for me.

yossarian
03-12-2006, 06:55
Hey, the opera stuff is classic. Reminds me of Pauline Kael's review of "A Night at the
Opera": "The Marx Bros, doing to 'Il Trovatore what SHOULD be done to 'Il Trovatore'".

My answer is "no".

Scarpia
03-12-2006, 07:15
I use it as a last resort, but if there is no available light, one must provide one's own.
I always liked HCB's comment that use of flash was akin to arriving at the opera with a handgun. That is indeed something I might be accused of doing...
I only bring a handgun to performances of Die Meistersinger. By firing at the right times no one hears the shots and no one notices the casualties on stage.
I only use flash for family snapshots at home. The most frustrating thing that occasionally happens is when I carry a P&S for street shooting because of its pocketability, the auto flash goes off because I have forgotten or failed to turn it off.
Kurt M.

Honu-Hugger
03-12-2006, 07:24
With the number of firearms and concealed carry permits in Idaho it's no wonder we don't have opera...I just never made the correlation before now.

Scarpia
03-12-2006, 07:25
Hey, the opera stuff is classic. Reminds me of Pauline Kael's review of "A Night at the
Opera": "The Marx Bros, doing to 'Il Trovatore what SHOULD be done to 'Il Trovatore'".

My answer is "no".
Have met Kitty Carlysle Hart several times as she used to kick off NY State employees United Fund effort 20 years ago or so. She starred in " A Night at the Opera". Last week, now 95 years old she was interviewed by PBS station WNYC.
We should all be so sharp at 95. She is still performing occassionally at upscale cocktail lounges in NYC and is currently doing so.
Kurt M.

sbug
03-12-2006, 07:25
I chose "never, I am available light or go home" but that's mostly because I have no idea what I'm doing when it comes to using flash. I have one but I haven't spent time yet to figure it out.

dostacos
03-12-2006, 08:39
currently I use my canonet 17 with it's flash when needed.

I will be shooting my oldest son's wedding in July [also have a paid wedding photog to the tune of $3500 :eek: ] I will be shooting B&W the pro I believe will be shooting digital

my plan it to work with my Bessa R and 35MM with flash on one body and the 50/1.5MM available light on the other.

so now I need to choose a flash for the Bessa and practice, practice, practice :rolleyes:

RML
03-12-2006, 08:57
I don't use flash at all. And available light to me regularly means that there's plenty of light, even until deep at night. I just have to find a place that's not completely blacked out and I can take a photo of it. :)

jlw
03-12-2006, 09:18
Sure, I use flash -- but 99% of the time it's in studio settings, where I need to be able to construct the light "environment."

Once in a very great while I'll use off-camera flash to add modeling in a flatly-lit available-light setting, such as a fluorescent-lit office.

Flash on camera? Only in a dire emergency (I think my last such dire emergency happened about five years ago, and the picture came out crummy anyway.) Built-in flash? Ewww...

jonasv
03-12-2006, 09:21
I will be shooting my oldest son's wedding in July [also have a paid wedding photog to the tune of $3500 :eek: ] I will be shooting B&W the pro I believe will be shooting digital


:eek:

$ 3500 !!!

You should have asked a couple of RFF'ers, I think five or six non-professional photographers together could take at least as many keepers as one pro. Would have saved you a lot of money! ;)

dmr
03-12-2006, 09:40
Flash may be part of photography, but I don't like it. The light it produces is harsh and it disrupts the goings-on. It attracts too much attention.

My dad's old lightbulb-size flash bulbs always scared the cat and annoyed me. The thing I liked about having that first rangefinder with the fast lens was that I could take indoors, usually, without flash.

And then there's Weegee ...

Chaser
03-12-2006, 10:41
Many times a flash is required, especially if you're getting paid for the shots; but I don't like using them generally. :cool:


I will very rarely use a flash, i have gotten paid for over a year as photoeditor and chief photographer for a small weekly newspaper, and i rare....very rarely use flash. Honestly i have only used a flash for 5 shots in about a year. It is a sort of personal choice. Though i may not be doing real hardcore journalistic work i try to avoid flash because i feel that it gives a false look to a photo that implies that everything happens in ideal light. If a bus crashed on a county road at night the people who expirianced it did not do so by bright daylight balance light. ... but this is different than portraits or a wedding or such where the idea is to give the subject what they want and expect.

tarasi
03-12-2006, 11:00
I very rarely use flash,only with my Hexar AF .

Corneliu

Andy K
03-12-2006, 13:26
I never use flash, I find it makes photographs look harsh and unnatural. The attached interior shots of the SS Great Britain restoration and preservation project were shot handheld with available light.

Gid
03-12-2006, 14:06
Use it on my DSLR when I have to, never on RFs. Have a portable studio set up with Bowens lights when the need arises. Did some corporate shots for the company I work for last year - started out with DSLR and flash and then tried some with the RD-1 and no flash. Guess which ones were used - okay, don't guess - the RD-1 shots. However, the DSLR with dedicated flash looked more "PRO" and they were happy for me to use my toy camera as long as I had a proper one. :D

VinceC
03-12-2006, 16:22
Back when I got paid to take photos, I used that flash quite a bit more. It's still always in the camera bag. But I NEVER, EVER use direct flash. There's always something to bounce the light off or diffuse it in some way. On rare occassions when that's impossible, I use a six-foot extension cable and hold it at arm's length, or better yet, have some else hold it even further away.

Flash is great for outdoor fill-light and to use when you've got to get a shot and there just isn't any light.

I suspect that one reason old Speed Graphics were constantly shot with a flash bulb, day or night, is that it took the guesswork out of exposure.

On operas, my wife and I once attended "The Marriage of Figaro." We enjoyed the music and pagentry, but we never did figure out which one was Figaro.

Finder
03-12-2006, 16:49
Once in a while, but only when there is too much light. I never use it in indoors or at night.

jlw
03-12-2006, 17:46
I love the contrast to Weegee (Speed Graphic with an RF... ;) Can't tell you how much he used it... <LOL> )

I seem to recall reading somewhere that he used it quite a bit. This vaguely-recollected reading was that some of his most famous pictures (possibly such as "The Critic") were taken with infrared film and infrared flashbulbs, enabling him to shoot without visible light at all. To focus, he used the Kalart Focuspot accessory that was built into Kalart RF units; this consisted of a battery case and a small bulb with a V-shaped filament, which mounted to a special holder behind the beamsplitter of the RF.

When you switched on the Focuspot, it projected an image of the filament backwards through the rangefinder optics, causing the Vs to be visible on the subject. You'd watch the subject and turn the focusing knob until the Vs came together, indicating the image was in focus; then you'd fire away. It was exactly the same principle as normal rangefinder focusing, except that instead of looking through the eyepiece to line up coincident images, you projected the images onto the subject and lined them up there.

Of course it only worked under really dark conditions, and even then only out to 10 or 15 feet -- but it DID work. I remember playing with it on one of the retired Crown Graphic cameras we kept in the photo lab of the newspaper where I used to work.

Doug
03-12-2006, 18:12
I always liked HCB's comment that use of flash was akin to arriving at the opera with a handgun. That is indeed something I might be accused of doing...I hope never to be so accused since nobody should be aware of it... I try to avoid the "flash" AND the "bang". I have the dedicated flashes for both my CLE and Fuji GA645 but don't recall ever using them. I also have an Ultrablitz Matador 400, switchable power up to 200ws, not sure if it still works, but long ago used it bounced off ceilings and an umbrella. I am impressed at the skill of some using a flash effectively outside of a controlled environment.

ErnestoJL
03-12-2006, 19:12
I do allways shoot with available light, besides, Im too lazy to carry a flash with me.
The real reason is that I never wanted the unnatural kind of lighting a flash can give.
However there are some situations where a flash would/will help, but one must be sure if its worth the price.

Ernesto

Flinor
03-12-2006, 19:18
I'm pretty sure I own at least one flash. I just don't know where it is.

MinorTones
03-12-2006, 20:24
As a staff photog at a newspaper down here I am forced to use flash a lot. If I do have to use it I always look at the cieling first to bounce it. Bounced flash really looks good and is many times neccesary in my line of work.

pvdhaar
03-12-2006, 22:21
I don't consider flash merely as a portable sun.

IMO, a flash adds enormous flexibility to get the image you want;
- fill in shadows
- mitigate contrast
- add highlights
- add light with different colour temperature
- freeze subject motion
- add dark outlines in backlit situations

Stephanie Brim
03-12-2006, 23:37
I only do photography for fun...and a lot of my shots may or may not benefit from a flash. I just don't like using one and never have. The entire point of buying fast lenses for my SLR (when I had it) and my rangefinders is so that I can get away from using a flash. To each his own, though. I've seen lots of good photos from others that were taken with a flash used.

Toby
03-13-2006, 00:55
I use flash a lot although not with RF as I find it makes the camera feel very top heavy

Brian Sweeney
03-13-2006, 04:43
I use the SB29 ring-light a lot with the Micro-Nikkor. It is also nice for Portraits; but I've only used it with the Nikon E3 and N8008s.

I test the Sync on the RF's before selling them. Just to make sure it works.

ch1
03-13-2006, 07:32
Had to pick the "occassional" option although almost the only flash I use are the built-ins on the digicams (D-70 and G-1).

I have all kinds of flash units (kind feel you "supposed" to have them) but really never took the time to learn how to use them properly. I guess it's on my photography "to do list" of things I need to learn when I have more time (did anyone say - retirement?).

JohnL
03-13-2006, 08:39
I tend to use flash indoors and sometimes outdoors for fill with SLR / DLSR. So far I haven't used it with RF since I got one after *many* years without one. I think I might someday get a small flash for RF for fill outdoors, but I can't see using flash indoors (which I always diffuse or bounce, with a fairly big flashgun) on an RF. The flash would be about twice the size of the camera! How should I vote?

nwcanonman
03-13-2006, 20:54
I've answered the question in it's context - RF photography. On SLR's I use flash a lot, weddings I use it every shot.
But for RF shots I only use it only when I absolutely HAVE to, and use a tiny Sunpak 1600A flash (two AA's). To me , part of RF photography is "stealth", catching light and life as it happens, not posed or contrived. JMHO ~; - ) :D

GeneW
03-14-2006, 02:42
I occasionally use flash and occasionally attend an opera, but never both at the same time

Gene