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Brian Legge
09-26-2017, 23:58
Okay, odd/naive question but I could use some ideas.

My wife and I are expecting our first child. Our computer/camera room is becoming a guest room... with some space dedicated to a vastly reduced amount of camera gear. We're in the process of furnishing the room at the moment.

For those who have children and camera gear, how do you store it? We'll have guests with kids of various ages staying in the guest room, I'm thinking more about how to handle storing gear as with kids in the house long term.

Ideally the more valuable elements would be in closed/locked cabinet. Is that a risk for fungus or other issues compared to storing in a more open-air environment? Higher locations aren't idea due to earthquake risk.

I know this sounds silly compared to the big picture life changes but I want to figure it out so I focus on more important issues. :)

sleepyhead
09-27-2017, 00:18
Pelican cases with dessicant gel packs inside, perhaps. They can be locked if necessary.

valdas
09-27-2017, 00:27
If you play ball with your kids in-house - don't keep your cameras on open shelves, I have learned that obvious lesson the hard way :) It's ok, it's just camera - I said to my boy. And yes, it's just camera...

shimokita
09-27-2017, 01:08
I have a lockable electronic powered dry-box (it only opens/closes with the key)... there are many sizes.

When I was a kid growing up my dad was a professional photographer and he had (among other equipment) a Linhof 5x7 Technika. I use to play with the lenses... could not get enough of the shutter action... I guess it was the start of something ; )

ruby.monkey
09-27-2017, 02:32
I kept a couple of sacrificial cameras for my kids to play with; the rest went into a glass-fronted cupboard.

Kids love Spotmatics.

JoeLopez
09-27-2017, 03:57
Okay, odd/naive question but I could use some ideas.

My wife and I are expecting our first child. Our computer/camera room is becoming a guest room... with some space dedicated to a vastly reduced amount of camera gear. We're in the process of furnishing the room at the moment.

For those who have children and camera gear, how do you store it? We'll have guests with kids of various ages staying in the guest room, I'm thinking more about how to handle storing gear as with kids in the house long term.

Ideally the more valuable elements would be in closed/locked cabinet. Is that a risk for fungus or other issues compared to storing in a more open-air environment? Higher locations aren't idea due to earthquake risk.

I know this sounds silly compared to the big picture life changes but I want to figure it out so I focus on more important issues. :)

I use Sterilite ClearView Latch Storage Bin (https://www.target.com/p/sterilite-174-clearview-latch-storage-bin-clear-with-purple-latch-3-75gal/-/A-13794491#lnk=sametab)s from Target, etc. I use silica packs and do not close them tight. These are stored on shelves in a closet. Out of sight, out of mind.

maddoc
09-27-2017, 04:05
I have a lockable electronic powered dry-box (it only opens/closes with the key)... there are many sizes.


Same here. Helps preventing fungus infection of the lenses and keeps fingerprints away. I have some junk cameras my son and friends can play with and enjoy setting aperture, distance and shutter speeds.

Richard G
09-27-2017, 04:37
Never been a problem. My kids never touched my cameras. I didn't really think about it. It is only once we got a cat that I was careful not to leave a camera on the piano stool. Displeased cats have such a delicate touch in knocking precious things to the floor. And now even that seems not to be a problem. The piano stool seems not to interest him.

Highway 61
09-27-2017, 05:10
The good photographer rule #1 is : no wife, ni kids. A cat only (the best earthquake detector), but never ever allowed in the darkroom. From times to times, a young, rich and single girlfriend blessed with a family castle you will spend some week-ends at (she just has a swimming-pool digged somewhere in the park).

Ko.Fe.
09-27-2017, 05:23
Worry about kids, not lifeless cameras.

Parent with kinds, owner of cameras.

jaapv
09-27-2017, 06:08
Okay, odd/naive question but I could use some ideas.

My wife and I are expecting our first child. Our computer/camera room is becoming a guest room... with some space dedicated to a vastly reduced amount of camera gear. We're in the process of furnishing the room at the moment.

For those who have children and camera gear, how do you store it? We'll have guests with kids of various ages staying in the guest room, I'm thinking more about how to handle storing gear as with kids in the house long term.

Ideally the more valuable elements would be in closed/locked cabinet. Is that a risk for fungus or other issues compared to storing in a more open-air environment? Higher locations aren't idea due to earthquake risk.

I know this sounds silly compared to the big picture life changes but I want to figure it out so I focus on more important issues. :)Just put a hefty Silicagel pack in with the cameras and lock the cupboard.

pthornto
09-27-2017, 09:38
I don't worry too much about it. I have a 2 year old and a 6 year old. I keep my few cameras in a couple of bags in the master bedroom. The bags are open so humidity is managed. The girls never seem to bother with the cameras...the worst I had to do was pick up my 2 year old when she was trying to step on a camera bag. She wouldn't have affected anything. I did make sure I kept the RB67 on a bag on the floor though...If it was left out I worried that they may TRY to pick it up and drop it on themselves when they realize how heavy it really is.

Brian Legge
09-27-2017, 10:39
Thanks all. Its my first time thinking about child proofing. Most of the stuff is simple. The camera gear was a question as I've always stored gear on low open shelves and have never dealt with humidity management.

Darshan
09-27-2017, 11:07
My kids are older (8 & 10) and I have taught them how to use my various cameras and they do it with great care. I have been impressed by some of their photos, they see things differently from a different vantage point. Now they are learning how to develop film.. :D

f16sunshine
09-27-2017, 11:09
Congratulations Brian !
Best to you and yours :)

ptpdprinter
09-27-2017, 11:25
I use Sterlite ClearView Latch Storage Bins from Target, etc. I use silica packs and do not close them tight. These are stored on shelves in a closet. Out of sight, out of mind.
Me too.. plus I keep my standard kit in my camera bag. If you are worried about your kids or guests getting in to your camera stuff, it's easy to put a lock on the closet door. Don't over think it.

Spanik
09-27-2017, 12:54
Think about it before having kids?

kxl
09-27-2017, 14:04
Lock 'em up! The camera gear, not the kids... On the other hand, hmmmm...

Ronald M
09-27-2017, 14:13
Lockable file cabinets. I have one normal 4 drawer, one 2 drawer new style where the drawers open sideways. There are very heavy.

If you have a closet , change the lock set to keyed one and move equipment there as required.

B-9
09-27-2017, 15:54
Better yet lock the kid up! Peanut butter is cheaper than silica!

x-ray
09-27-2017, 16:00
I keep all of my cameras and lenses in 2 large gun safes. You don't need to go to that extreme but an inexpensive gun cabinet anchored into the floor will not only give security for you cameras but it's a good place to store other valuables and important papers like insurance and car titles. They're relatively inexpensive too.

My home has low humidity so I don't have any fungus problems but most gun cabinets have a hole in the back to install a low wattage heater to drive out moisture. These are very low power and quite inexpensive.

Check your sporting goods store that sells hunting equipment. Even our farm store, tractor supply, sells cabinets.

Edit

Cabellas sells a rifle cabinet for $118. Think of it as a cheap security system. A heat stick will run about $20.

coogee
09-27-2017, 16:30
Just put your camera equipment up high, kids are short.
By the time they're able to climb or build, they'll have had said camera equipment pointed at them ten thousand times and be very familiar with it as something important (to you.)

Anything below 1m in your house will be fair game in 18 months, but by then you won't care so much is my guess.

As for locked cabinets, it's not my MO personally. You don't need to hide things from them once they get to kindergarten age, just let them know and understand what is out of bounds and they'll get it. Otherwise you're headed into 'Cameron' territory (Ferris reference there if that's too obtuse.)

Congratulations, enjoy the ride, take many pictures.

Steve M.
09-27-2017, 19:00
The really good photographers I know keep their kids safely locked up somewheres, and the camera gear out in the open for display.

Next question?

David Hughes
09-28-2017, 01:24
but don't lock the cat away with the kids as cats get hungry sometimes and don't really care about us...

Regards, David

papaki
09-28-2017, 02:22
Fortunately my kid is not a menace. He likes looking at my stuff and sometimes when I develop a roll I get a frame or two with his face out of focus. I am not saying anything though. I'd love if he would get into the world of film photography just like me.

michaelwj
09-28-2017, 05:53
Out of reach, just like other sharp/heavy/dangerous stuff kids might want to play with. It's not rocket science.

David Hughes
09-28-2017, 06:58
Hmmm, no one has wondered out loud how anyone can afford a hobby like photography and kids.

Regards, David

ptpdprinter
09-28-2017, 07:01
Hmmm, no one has wondered out loud how anyone can afford a hobby like photography and kids.
Photography doesn't have to be expensive. The real issue is time.

BillBingham2
09-28-2017, 07:11
I switched camera to Bessas and put my Leicas up high in the closet.

Kids wanted to take pictures with them from time to time and along as used the neck strap I was fine.

B2 (;->

David Hughes
09-29-2017, 06:52
Photography doesn't have to be expensive. The real issue is time.


You can have young kids and free time?


Regards, David

ruby.monkey
09-29-2017, 08:01
Sell the kids, buy more cameras. Problem solved.

ptpdprinter
09-29-2017, 08:41
You can have young kids and free time?
Yeah, disappearing into the darkroom for four or five hours on a Saturday afternoon when you have a couple of young children is a real stretch.

noisycheese
10-01-2017, 16:33
Pelican cases with dessicant gel packs inside, perhaps. They can be locked if necessary.

That's how I store my cameras; it works very well.

Sell the kids, buy more cameras. Problem solved.

LOL!! I'll second that! :D

Ronald M
10-01-2017, 17:19
Just put your camera equipment up high, kids are short.
By the time they're able to climb or build, they'll have had said camera equipment pointed at them ten thousand times and be very familiar with it as something important (to you.)

Anything below 1m in your house will be fair game in 18 months, but by then you won't care so much is my guess.

As for locked cabinets, it's not my MO personally. You don't need to hide things from them once they get to kindergarten age, just let them know and understand what is out of bounds and they'll get it. Otherwise you're headed into 'Cameron' territory (Ferris reference there if that's too obtuse.)

Congratulations, enjoy the ride, take many pictures.

One meter not good enuf. My daughter moved a kitchen chair to countertop, counter top to top of refrigerator where spouse found her. You know, go looking when things are quiet.

She is probably near genius IQ. But all kids are smarter than we give credit for.

JoeLopez
10-02-2017, 03:57
One meter not good enuf. My daughter moved a kitchen chair to countertop, counter top to top of refrigerator where spouse found her. You know, go looking when things are quiet.

She is probably near genius IQ. But all kids are smarter than we give credit for.

Not to mention flying toys in the house from time to time :)

Out to Lunch
10-02-2017, 04:28
I kept a couple of sacrificial cameras for my kids to play with

At the time, I did the same thing. Worked out fine.

Big Ursus
10-03-2017, 01:42
When my kids were little, I kept my gear in my dark room, in closed camera bags, on the dry side.

" Yeah, disappearing into the darkroom for four or five hours on a Saturday afternoon when you have a couple of young children is a real stretch."

I invited them in when I was enlarging. I remember enjoying my four-year old daughter's company in there, but it was my son who became a photo-journalist. Maybe because he had a picture he took published when he was about six.