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kkdanamatt
04-20-2017, 10:07
Clothing store in Dresden.

Fjäll
04-20-2017, 10:13
http://rs1132.pbsrc.com/albums/m579/NixHaw/Whatever/Headache.gif?w=480&h=480&fit=clip

mbf4755
04-20-2017, 10:22
Coffee cup lid in Illinois:

http://gallery.leica-users.org/d/440855-1/KIMG0023.jpg

Matt

css9450
04-20-2017, 10:22
Put tape over the logo and it'll make you look thinner.

Steve Bellayr
04-20-2017, 10:41
Nothing to worry about. The average camera buy will realize the mistake a short 10 minutes after entering.

Roger Hicks
04-20-2017, 12:44
No, not a «rip off».

cf.:

https://register.dpma.de/DPMAregister/marke/imagedisplay/fullimage/2673942/DE/466177/-1



Date of [first] entry into the [German Trade Mark] register: May 24, 1934
Then again, how many of their customers have had their clothing ripped of by over-enthusiastic would-be lovers?

I've long thought that if there's time for love, there's usually time to undo the buttons. Not always, but usually.

Cheers,

R.

rscheffler
04-20-2017, 14:38
A search of the DPMA database indicates the term "Leica" was first registered in 1937. The familiar Leica cursive script was registered in 1974 and the red dot with the Leica script in it was registered in 1987...

Keith
04-20-2017, 16:15
It's not like ripping off the coke logo or maybe the golden arches ... the average Joe/Jill in the street wouldn't be familiar with Leica ... or their pixie dust for that matter! :)

mbisc
04-21-2017, 13:17
Leiser is (originally) a German shoe company that was founded in 1891, and has used the "curly-looking" logo since about 1920. It looks just like grade school level, standard German handwriting, so I doubt that there is anything to protect here...

nikonhswebmaster
04-21-2017, 13:55
Leiser is (originally) a German shoe company that was founded in 1891, and has used the "curly-looking" logo since about 1920. It looks just like grade school level, standard German handwriting, so I doubt that there is anything to protect here...

Here is an article referencing the script.

http://www.printmag.com/daily-heller/the-future-of-german-advertising-past-julius-gipkens/

sevo
04-22-2017, 02:08
Yes and no. German, particularly the Prussian influenced German, «standard» school handwriting was (and still is) slanted — insofar this upright form is a very advanced form, quite probably influenced by school handwriting reformers like the Austrian teacher Prof. Alois Legrün (see my signature pic).

I agree. When that logo was designed, Gothic typefaces still were standard in Germany, and the official handwriting taught at German schools was "Sütterlin", a ridiculously edgy (and nowadays entirely illegible) pseudo-medieval Gothic script invented in the historicism period of the late 19th century era. The rounded, barely slanted Latin script typeface of the logo may look outdated now, but it actually was very modern by contemporary standards - not radical (the twenties also spawned sans-serif typefaces like Erbar and Futura which still are modern by current standards), but still a very significant departure from the official Gothic typefaces.

Dralowid
04-22-2017, 02:25
Look at the original Elmo logo and also Zeika...