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GeneW
12-18-2005, 04:25
I tend to use B&W film almost exclusively in my rangefinders, but have thought about keeping slide film loaded in one of them. Most of the members here appear to shoot B&W primarily, or col neg film. How many of you use slide film in your RF's?

Gene

SolaresLarrave
12-18-2005, 04:34
You don't have an "always" category... so I voted "Other" because I happen to love slide film.

Hence, it's all I shoot.

Ocassionally, I load print film in one of my cameras. But it's very, very infrequent.

GeneW
12-18-2005, 04:36
You don't have an "always" category... so I voted "Other" because I happen to love slide film.

Hence, it's all I shoot.

Ocassionally, I load print film in one of my cameras. But it's very, very infrequent.
I'm not a good pollster ... I guess 'frequently' would cover you, albeit understated? :D

Gene

Goodyear
12-18-2005, 04:39
Once in a while.

When I shoot colour, it's rarely print film. Usually either digital or E6. But I don't shoot colour all that often.

Frank Granovski
12-18-2005, 04:41
I used to shoot mostly colour slides, but for the last 15 years it has become rather expensive to have developed so I use it occasionally only.

thmk
12-18-2005, 04:59
If I need color I take slide film because these films mostly do not come back this badly scratched from the lab like color printing film.
Sometimes I also use the AGFA Scala but I do not know if I am too stupid to scan this great film or if my Nikon Coolscan IV ED simply cannot really handle it.

Cheers
Thomas-Michael

Per
12-18-2005, 05:03
For colour I use slide film only. But then only in SLR (Pentax SPf) or TLR (Yahsica Mat).
I just love MF slides, large and brilliant. At least a few of them...

Just remember I bought a few rolls of Reala for Christmas.
______
Per

eric mac
12-18-2005, 05:06
I shoot mostly B&W, but the other day I put a roll of slides for fun. However, I usually shoot 120 in slides as they are really cool to look at on a light table.

Eric

darkkavenger
12-18-2005, 05:07
besides traditional bw film, i shoot with ektachrome E200 :)

peter_n
12-18-2005, 05:09
I'm afraid I'm a bit of a barbarian. I only shoot B&W neg in the RFs. Color with the digi P&S.

hoot
12-18-2005, 05:14
I tried Scala once, but it was too expensive and they charged a small fortune to develop it, too.

Or did you mean color? I tend to become color-blind when peering through a viewfinder. :D

On the rare occasions I have to shoot color professionally, I use a medium format camera.

C Atwell
12-18-2005, 05:17
During my military career it was much easier to share photos instead of slides so I have always used it.

Nikon Bob
12-18-2005, 05:23
Years ago I shot some slides with an SLR and loved to see them projected. My end use for photos taken was for prints so I decided to shoot C41, colour and B&W, because slide film was no advantage for me and was a more expensive route. YMMV.

Bob

DougK
12-18-2005, 06:07
I almost always shoot color slide film in 35mm. I'll throw in a roll or two of black-and-white for a change of pace, but I seem to get my best results from slide film.

Trius
12-18-2005, 06:27
Gene: Well, you know my answer! ;) I shoot transparency a lot, as I find the colour, sharpness and tonality of slides to be unique and very pleasing to me. C41 is a good substitute when the final result is the web and a high quality scan can be obtained.

Earl

Nick R.
12-18-2005, 06:31
I've just started shooting slides again for a few good reasons. It cost me less than $5 to have a roll of 36 developed and mounted. It's easier to scan a slide than a neg and it's held flatter in the mount. Lastly, it's a lot of fun to gather the family and view projected slides. It's better than having everyone peering over your shoulder at the monitor.

Kim Coxon
12-18-2005, 06:36
Hi,
My preference has always been for slide film. Normally Velvia.

Kim

aad
12-18-2005, 06:39
I can get E6 processed in 2 hours (!) so I would like to shoot more- I still find scanning it to be chancy, but I can get them scanned at development(!) too-

In the old days, it was B&W for prints, slides for color.

Aardvark Aallen
12-18-2005, 06:56
I don't use slide film because I lost my projector. I now store and show shots on my computer or thru my TV. I find that 'shows' are not usually focused on image quality but the image message. So using digital projectors is adequate for that purpose.

Images for putting on a wall or in a book, I use regular film. My current departure is C41 BW thats as far toward the edge as I get! LOL

dmr
12-18-2005, 09:38
I've just started shooting slides again for a few good reasons. It cost me less than $5 to have a roll of 36 developed and mounted.

Many years ago I used to shoot a lot of slide film. Main reason was that I wanted color, but being a poor starving student I couldn't afford to print all I shot, and 90% of it I didn't want printed anyway. It was much easier in those days to see what I wanted to have printed using slides than negatives. Back then the neighborhood photo development places didn't offer such things as contact sheets.

Lastly, it's a lot of fun to gather the family and view projected slides. It's better than having everyone peering over your shoulder at the monitor.

I've never shot slides for the purpose of projecting. I've always done them for prints of those that I were good enough to want prints of. What's amazing is that a few of those 70's vintage reversal type prints from slides have kept amazingly well. Better on average than the prints from color negatives of that era.

flashover
12-18-2005, 10:01
haven't shot a roll of slide film in twenty years or so. Haven't realy shot film in 5 years either. Maybe I will try a roll of slide again just for fun. John

illuminatus
12-18-2005, 10:04
I exclusively use slide films. Occassionally, I use B&W films, but I can't seem to get good results like some people from this forum. I use Velvia 50 and 100F. Velvia 50 is a good film, but a bit impractical for most use. These days, I shoot mainly with Velvia 100F. Does anyone recommend other slide films?

rbiemer
12-18-2005, 10:06
Occasionally for me. Usually when I've just got a "new" camera. I will shoot a roll of slide film to make sure the camera is working OK. I did buy two rolls of 64 kodachrome just for something "special"--not sure what that will be yet.
Rob

julianphotoart
12-18-2005, 10:35
I'd say 80% slide film as I purchase new. The only print film I'm using is that which my wife insists I use or it's old film that I'm using up.

Slide film show exactly what happened when I made a particular photo; no interpretation, degradation, duplication, reversal, etc. Permanent and unmanipulated.

bean_counter
12-18-2005, 20:56
I shoot mainly B&W (fun 'n cheap), but for important things - scenic vacations, family gatherings - I try to shoot Kodachrome.

I grew up with slide shows, and my dad shooting Kodachrome on a IIIf/Summitar. For me, it's the way photos are 'supposed' to look!!

bobomoon
12-18-2005, 21:13
Occasionally for me. Usually when I've just got a "new" camera. I will shoot a roll of slide film to make sure the camera is working OK. I did buy two rolls of 64 kodachrome just for something "special"--not sure what that will be yet.
Rob

I never thought I would until I started buying it cheap from gone totally digital pros. Now I use slide exclusively with point and shoots or oly xa. I like the combo of best film with cheapest gear.

However, I've never shot kodachrome 64 and I'd like to try it out before it's too late...
Am I wrong about this? How much time do I have?

Much Respect

photogdave
12-18-2005, 21:38
When I shoot colour it's almost always slide film I only shoot neg if a specific job or occasion calls for it (like a wedding). I'll shoot it in my Nikon SLR if exposure accuracy or long lenses are called for but otherwise I love how my Summicron 50 and CV 21 Skopar render colour from Kodak E100 VS and Fuji Provia 100.
I just realized I've never shot colour slide film in my Rollei so if the weather is good this week I'm gonna give it a go!

Rich Silfver
12-18-2005, 21:44
B&W about 75% of the time.
Colour the rest and always slide film (Provia 100F or 400F) as I've found that personally I have an easier time scanning and post-processing slide film than any C-41 film I've tried.

pvdhaar
12-18-2005, 21:47
I've almost stopped using slide film. It's now either Fuji NPH or Ilford HP5+. They're 400 ISO and let me shoot indoors as well as outside under low light conditions, and still give a reasonable smooth picture..

trittium
12-18-2005, 21:47
I use slide film all the time, and when I use C-41 I cross process it in E6 chemistry anyway. I also do extreme slide film pushes like 100 to 3200 (but usually only 1600). It is mad good for that. E6 is awesome!

ClaremontPhoto
12-18-2005, 22:05
I'm experimenting with some 1998 expiry Fuji Sensia slde film cross processed in C41.

Oldprof
12-18-2005, 22:10
As an anthropologist and professor I have been interested in documenting cultures and using images from my field research in classroom presentations. Slides were the logical solution to my needs, and for many years I used Kodachrome 64 for most, if not all, of my shooting. This had another fortuitous consequence - Kodachrome has great archival qualities. I have Kodachrome slides from from the 1960s that still look wonderful, and some Ektachrome slides from the same period that display terrible color shifts.

Sadly, Kodachrome seems to be on its last legs and very few labs process it these days. This is a real tragedy for photographers who need color photography with archival permanence. Some might say that digital images are also archival, but this has not been proven. Digital formats and storage options evolve very rapidly and old formats quickly become obsolete.

Parkes Owen
12-18-2005, 22:19
I shoot velvia 50% of the time, and B/W ilford and fuji. I love viewing slides on my rollei projector or putting 120 velvia on a light box, digital doesn`t even come close!

GeneW
12-19-2005, 04:28
I picked up a couple of rolls of Sensia 100 to try out. Sensia is relatively inexpensive and I'm told it's a decent film.

Gene

lido
12-19-2005, 04:46
I think I only shot about 5 rolls of slide film in my life. Never had a projector, but always wanted one. Long time ago (well not that long, maybe 30 years ago) when I was a kid, I was always fascinated when my unlce would gather us in a darkened room and give us a slide show. Loved that, still remember some of the shots of the forest in the fall, red leaves hanging off the branches and lining the pathway. Maybe one day, if I find a cheap projector, I'll get one and start shooting some Provia.
Almost bought one at the last Thornhill photo show, but backed out. I only shoot B&W film, the rest is digital.

Socke
12-19-2005, 04:57
Sadly, Kodachrome seems to be on its last legs and very few labs process it these days. This is a real tragedy for photographers who need color photography with archival permanence. Some might say that digital images are also archival, but this has not been proven. Digital formats and storage options evolve very rapidly and old formats quickly become obsolete.


Backward compatibility is something which is valued in IT. The next generation optical media readers/writers will be backward compatible to CDs. My top of the line Dual Layer DVD burner has no problems reading CD-Rs from 1993!

In february I had to restore a database modell from 3.5" floppy disks which we haven't used for 10 years to convert a customers archive system to todays software. We went from Windows 3.11 to Windows XP and a database engine which hasn't been maintained since 1994 to MS SQL Server 2000 without loosing anything.

Digital media are save as long as you buy decent media and take some care in storing them.
Well documented formats free of patents and IP constraints is a plus, TIFF and JPEG and PNG will be usable forever since it is no secret how they are encoded, vendor formats like Nikon NEF or Canon CRW and CR2 may cause a problem as they are protected by patentes and copyrights and you may not decode them with anything but the vendors application which may not be available in a couple of years.

So there is reason for concerns about the longevity of digital archives, but with a little care and some planing digital archives should pose no problem for the next couple of decades.

bmicklea
12-19-2005, 05:52
I love slide film and used to shoot that exclusively. However, once I started wanting to make some prints I found that the transneg costs were painful. So now I mainly shoot C41 for colour and old standbys like Tri-X for B&W.

The points made about scanning slide film are true. It's one of my pet peeves actually - I can shoot slide, scan and print out something decent at home, or I can shoot negs, get fantastic prints from a printer but get crappy scans at home.

Maybe I should just bite the bullet and invest in a proper film scanner...but it's the cost of a new lens, and I love those!

Oldprof
12-19-2005, 05:59
Backward compatibility is something which is valued in IT ...

... there is reason for concerns about the longevity of digital archives, but with a little care and some planing digital archives should pose no problem for the next couple of decades.


Thanks for your thoughtful and informative reply Socke!

Gabriel M.A.
12-19-2005, 06:00
I prefer to use chrome (slide) film when shooting outdoors, rather than film, if I know I'm going to be shooting outside w/color. That way I don't have to fiddle around with white balance. If I know I will be indoors and outdoors with the same roll, I avoid slide film if I know there won't be a good source of natural light (again, due to the white balance issue).

I spend less than half the time scanning slides than if I were scanning color film, but it's about three or four times as expensive. You win some, you lose some.

My favorite slide film is Fuji Provia 100F, but Kodak's Elitechrome 100 is surprisingly good and cheap (relatively). Ektachrome 400 is not bad at all either.

varjag
12-19-2005, 06:02
So far I've only used slide film with medium format: at 6x9 transparencies become very cool to look at.

However now am switching to chromes for all the (infrequent) documentary color work I do in 35mm too. Granted, modern color negs are more forgiving, scan nearly as well and cost less, but color-proofing them for publication is a pain. For a high-volume color shooter it might be not worth it, but should be ok for occasional outings.

sircarl
12-19-2005, 06:34
B&W almost exclusively in my rangefinders. But when my wife and I go on vacations, I always carry my delightful little Contax Aria, with a 28-70mm zoom, loaded with Fuji Astia 100F. While it's supposedly a "portrait" film, I find its true colors, realistic saturation, and low contrast marvelous for general travel photography (though it obviously has its limitations in low-light situations). And nothing beats projecting the slides when we get back home.

Al Patterson
12-19-2005, 06:54
I'm afraid I'm a bit of a barbarian. I only shoot B&W neg in the RFs. Color with the digi P&S.



I shoot B&W exclusely with my rangefinders, and Slide film in my SLR. Usual vacation gear would be either a CL or Canonet with B&W, the Canon SLR loaded with slide film, plus a digital camera.

Theo-Prof
12-19-2005, 06:54
My two favorite films are Fuli Velvia and Kodak High Speed Infrared. Both get plenty of use in my Bessa R. I also appreciate Tri-X and Kodak's chromogenic B&W film. I am looking to buy a Bessa-L and 25/4 so I can have two cameras--one loaded with Velvia and the other with B&W.

TEZillman
12-19-2005, 07:11
I use slide film almost exclusively, primarily Fuji Sensia or Provia. The photos I've posted to my gallery are on Provia.

Over the weekend, my wife and I have been going through about 60 years of slides that my father in law took. This is for a Christmas present project. I was surprised by the Kodachrome shots from the forties. Many of them are still nearly perfect from a color perspective. Many of the Ektachrome slides from the ensuing decades are badly faded, although the ones from the late 70s to present are just fine.

The Minolta Dual Scan IV that I bought the previous weekend has worked great!

jaapv
12-19-2005, 07:13
I'm using up my stock of Agfa RSXII from the freezer, a lovely film with great saturation, one of the few that give really good greens, but Agfa is no more, alas.

ch1
12-19-2005, 07:34
Before I started working with a RF I shot slide film almost exclusively in my SLR. More recently, I've been dividing my time b/w color slide and B&W negative.

What I like to do, whether using RF or SLR, is to carry two bodies that can interchange lenses - then I put color slide in one and B&W in the other. This is what I did when I went out to "shoot" for my RFF Book 2 submissions - which is why I have been able to send in one color and one B&W.

OTOH: I hardly ever shoot color print film - but my "better half" likes it because then she can get two print sets made up and "share" prints with her family & friends. [We could "solve" that by having her go digital and getting a good color printer .... but I'm resisting!]

GeneW
12-24-2005, 07:07
It appears that slide film is still holding its own among our membership. I've stocked up on some Sensia 100 to get back into it -- then I'll branch into other emulsions.

Yesterday we bought a projection screen -- we have NO suitable walls in our house for projecting slides. I have an old Ektagraphic projector in the closet and a bunch of slides from the 60's and 70's. We're going to have some family fun with this! :D

I suspect I'll mainly be using SLR gear for slides, but I might sneak a roll or two into the Leica as well ...

Gene

aad
12-24-2005, 07:38
I'll likely bite the bullet for a dedicated film/slide scanner in the next week or so, because I really like slides and E6 is so easy to get processed here. The C41 color is good stuff, I don't want to seem a snob-but I just like slides.

taffer
12-24-2005, 07:51
I shoot it mainly in my SLRs, don't ask me why 'cos I really don't know :p

I also ran a couple rolls thru my Canonet some months back and I remember being amazed at how well the back then recently acquired canonet performed with them :eek:

I'm curious as for slide film thru some classic lenses (ie Summitar), and with that 100' roll I got from Stephen a while ago I'm sure I could try something...

dostacos
12-24-2005, 07:57
In the past I have only shot slides when I shot for presentations, either for work or, church.
nothing like having 2000 people come to a special service to see YOUR vacation pictures.....

2 weeks touring ISRAEL, gotta get those scanned

Byuphoto
12-24-2005, 08:38
I don't think I have ever shot a single slide, in my life

l.mar
12-24-2005, 08:54
... most recently Ektachrome through a 6x9 folder. I miss Kodachrome 25 though --- I have boxes of slides from the 70's that still have brilliant color...

celluloidprop
12-24-2005, 10:21
The only slide film I shoot is 4x5, when I can afford it.

Currently I shoot only B&W in 35mm, a mix of color and B&W in 6x6, and mostly color in 4x5.

Trius
12-24-2005, 10:41
Gene: I think you'll like the results of slide film in the Leica. But I do have to admit that when I shoot chromes I tend to think of the SLR. It's only been lately that I've forced myself to shoot some chrome in the RFs. It's been an interesting experience. Metering seems to be even more critical than in my OMs, and I'm glad I've got the spot meter in the SPs. The results are worth it as sharpness is not affected by any mirror slap or aperture actuator. And as the 35 SPs use lens in shutter, there's even less vibration in the camera body. I'll save a K64 roll for you. ;)

ch1
12-24-2005, 14:38
It appears that slide film is still holding its own among our membership. I've stocked up on some Sensia 100 to get back into it -- then I'll branch into other emulsions.

Yesterday we bought a projection screen -- we have NO suitable walls in our house for projecting slides. I have an old Ektagraphic projector in the closet and a bunch of slides from the 60's and 70's. We're going to have some family fun with this! :D

I suspect I'll mainly be using SLR gear for slides, but I might sneak a roll or two into the Leica as well ...

Gene

Gene,

I'm sure you'll enjoy those slides. Mine date mainly from the 70's to present (with gaps) and I've been scanning them as a winter project. I am amazed at the continuing fidelity of the colors even in the oldest ones.

I still prefer slides for color (mainly SLR but also slip the occassional roll in my S2) and B&W negative. If AGFA wasn't on the ropes, I'd be tempted to try some of their B&W slide film. Wish Ilford made some. I like the slide format for hard copy image storage (although with DVD and HD back-ups these days).

George

RicardoD
04-25-2006, 11:09
To those of you shooting Fuji Velvia, does it look terrible if there are some people in the images. In other words should I avoid photos with my children? I know the skins tones are not optimized in Velvia but do faces look alien??

For that reason I have a couple of rolls of Astia in my fridge but would love to give Velvia a go eventually.

sfb_dot_com
04-25-2006, 11:33
Bit of a mixture at the moment. Results so far from the slides have been poor, although not afflicted by the graininess problem of B&W when scanning I've had quite a few with colour shifts, and poorly exposed. Mind you I think that might be something to do with a 12mm Heliar and extreme conditions like snow.

I'll persevere though as I've just got 8 rolls of Provia to put through.

All this talk of Kodachromes has whetted my appetite. Must dig a few out and scan them in.

Andy

jtzordon
04-25-2006, 11:35
My Velvia slides make everybody look pretty ruddy!

Socke
04-25-2006, 12:04
I'm using up my stock of Agfa RSXII from the freezer, a lovely film with great saturation, one of the few that give really good greens, but Agfa is no more, alas.


I'm still scanning my Madrid pictures and haven't resized anything for the web yet, but the greens from Elitechrome 100 are pretty good.

berci
04-25-2006, 12:20
I nearly exclusively use slide film nowadays.

Kodak EBX 100
Fuji Sensia II 100
Fuji Velvia 100F

robert blu
04-25-2006, 12:38
Actually I shoot 70% slide and 30% B&W (I feel a certain revival for this!)
I also shoot a few Scala, which give excellent result in projection (and where very good to be print in Cibachrome, when it was available). I also found some of htme very difficult to scan, let say impossible! and also very expensive. I used the 35mm with a large format mentality !!!
Sensia is my multipurpose slide film, good ratio quality/price but when I need/desire sharp vivid colours i go to the Velvia (now 100 F) .
robert

sf
04-25-2006, 16:48
I only shoot slides when I'm going to do color landscapes. Then I shoot Velvia.

Other than that, I dislike E-6 because it is finicky, expensive, and not the best for scanning.

suzums
04-25-2006, 17:36
I cross-process most of my slides.

amateriat
04-25-2006, 18:20
Other than that, I dislike E-6 because it is finicky, expensive, and not the best for scanning.
Depends on the film. Kodak's E200 is my current favorite for slides; decent, versative rated speed; pushable; pretty fine grain; and (in my experience, anyway) pretty easy to scan (for the record, most of the scanners I've worked with are from Minolta).


- Barrett

billwheeler
04-25-2006, 18:32
Nope. B&W film just about exclusively--and lately some digital media. Bill

jcline
04-25-2006, 19:57
I shoot slide film, but only to cross process.

Shadrash
04-25-2006, 20:07
Right now I am enjoying experimenting with as many different films as possible. I use Velvia, Sensia and I am now trying Fuji Fortia, which I picked up in Japan... supposidly more saturated than Velvia.

I will also try out some EliteChrome and Kodachrome just to have a look. Whenever I see some film I havn't tried, I pick some up for the hell of it. I actually like the cheap Konica film, and just picked up some Agfa from the Big W.

Aurelius
04-26-2006, 11:58
I use Provia 400.

My first and last Sensia 400 in my Epson 4990 to day. And I did not like it at all.
http://www.fotosidan.se/gallery/view.htm?ID=118272
I even converted one to B/W ... and lot of USM to others. Sorry.
Bessa R + Ultron 35mm

Provia for the street!

lynn
04-26-2006, 12:04
I picked up a couple of (120) orders a while back - at the supermarket (they send to a good lab in Germany) - and said to my husband: "Look! They didn't print this roll!" "Duh"", he said. "Those aren't negatives."
I grab, sometimes, from my vegetable drawer, and sometimes, apparantly, I don't Read.
The results were special enough to send me shopping for 6X6 slide mounts (labs in the Netherlands prefer mounted positives for printing purposes..) but what I really need - I fear - is a good MF scanner.

Socke
04-26-2006, 13:03
I use Provia 400.

My first and last Sensia 400 in my Epson 4990 to day. And I did not like it at all.
http://www.fotosidan.se/gallery/view.htm?ID=118272
I even converted one to B/W ... and lot of USM to others. Sorry.
Bessa R + Ultron 35mm

Provia for the street!


Hm, looks very diferent to my Sensia 100, haven't tried Sensia 400 yet.

amateriat
04-26-2006, 13:52
I use Provia 400.

My first and last Sensia 400 in my Epson 4990 to day. And I did not like it at all.
http://www.fotosidan.se/gallery/view.htm?ID=118272
I even converted one to B/W ... and lot of USM to others. Sorry.
Bessa R + Ultron 35mm

Provia for the street!
The last time I used Sensia (200, I think), it didn't play well with the film scanner I had at the time (Minolta Scan Elite 2900/Elite I). Needed more than a little tweaking in PS to set things right. Never had this problem with, say, Kodak E200 (or, for that matter, Provia 400).


- Barrett

jmilkins
04-27-2006, 04:42
I use slide more often than neg, especially with the Bessa L and CV 15 or 25. Often I'll use PS to see what the image looks like in monochrome - mst of my B&W gallery shots are monochromed trannie. Quite often the image looks better in B&W than Colour IMHO.

Though I'm just getting into processing B&W neg again, which will be fun.

robert blu
04-27-2006, 12:25
My opinion if you need a 400 ISO slide the choice is PROVIA 400 F ! It s one of the few things where I have no doubt ! Of course , personal idea !
ciao
rob

Graybeard
04-29-2006, 03:47
Slide film is the only type that I shoot with my Stereo Realist. This is a practical matter as I'm using a tranparency viewer to see my results as a stereo image.

I only shoot with ASA100 film - Sensia or Elite chrome. The Realist has a top shutter speed of 1/150th sec and a higher ASA is just too fast to use outdoors (I don't have ND filters in Series V). The Realist and other Stereo cameras of the 1950's were in use when color trtnsparency film were ASA10. Eventually I'll try B&W slides by reversal processing of T-Max 100, I'll enjoy producing slides in my B&W darkroom.

Doug Smith
04-29-2006, 06:54
E100G in my Rollei 35. Scans great and is my favorite all-around E6 film.

photocrazy
04-29-2006, 07:02
stocked some Velvia 50 for medium format. For 135 film, use Provia and Sensia 100.

Iskra 2
04-29-2006, 08:35
Always have Kodachrome 64 loaded in a body, usually the Electro 35 which meters almost perfectly. The old Canon FTb's/T70 meter OK too. Astia 100 is great for MF and LF, doesn't look like the other Fuji films.

Regards

PS: Jorge, why do the Gallery management procedures keep changing? For example, an image last night loaded ok, today, changed and not working, oh well.

Ok, Ok. [img] is turned off for this thread. Interesting and a time waster. Who wants to play games posting a pix?

mervynyan
04-29-2006, 15:10
Fuji RDP and RVp only, no Kodak slides.

Rhoyle
04-30-2006, 19:23
I find slide film easier to scan. Even though print film has more latitude, I like having the color reference right there on the lightbox.

DougK
04-30-2006, 20:08
I find slide film easier to scan. Even though print film has more latitude, I like having the color reference right there on the lightbox.
Same here. I usually have a devil of a time scanning color negatives; true black and white or C-41 B&W comes out OK but I have to fuss with it more than slides.

Uncle Bill
05-01-2006, 12:52
I have never shot slide film but I am curious to try it. Any favourites for film I should try and I guess a really important question how much does it cost to get processed?

Bill

Socke
05-01-2006, 13:01
IMO Fuji Sensia 100 is a good allround slide film. Kodak Elitechrome 100 a close second but looking at my slides from Madrid I should have underexposed 1/3 to 1/2 stop, it has some anoying green cast in the shaddows.

Both films cost in germany around 15 Euro per five pack including development. That's cheaper than C-41 film in this class.

Uncle Bill
05-01-2006, 13:10
IMO Fuji Sensia 100 is a good allround slide film. Kodak Elitechrome 100 a close second but looking at my slides from Madrid I should have underexposed 1/3 to 1/2 stop, it has some anoying green cast in the shaddows.

Both films cost in germany around 15 Euro per five pack including development. That's cheaper than C-41 film in this class.

Thanks for the information Socke, this will be a dumb question as I have used c-41 and black and white since I got into this grand hobby. Can I get prints made from slides?

Bill

Socke
05-01-2006, 13:30
yes, most labs do that from framed slides, but it's more expensive than prints from C-41.

I usualy have prints made from my scans.

Bertram2
05-03-2006, 09:06
My Velvia slides make everybody look pretty ruddy!

Velvia isn't thought for people, of course the extreme saturation makes them look like clowns.

bertram

Bertram2
05-03-2006, 09:11
IMO Fuji Sensia 100 is a good allround slide film. Kodak Elitechrome 100 a close second .

Sensia can get extremely blue, the backside of the medal. I was hesitating, but after a recommendation of a experienced slide user I bought some of the "Extra Color" version of the 100 Elitechrome, and I love it ! Seems tolerant !

bertram

iliks
05-17-2006, 06:25
You are really lucky guys if you are able to use the slide film! In places of residence like mine one cannot easily buy or process slide film no more! You have to wait about 2 weeks to develop. (When slide film should be processed immediately after shooting!)
The reason for this? Most people are amateurs with digital p&s, so the demand for the slide film has come to 0 - and its selling & processing was dropped.

RicardoD
05-17-2006, 06:47
iliks,

I live near Chicago, in the USA, and my situation is exactly the same. I can only buy slide film from New York through the mail, and then I send it off to Arizona for slide processing by Fuji labs.

You are not alone!

Ricardo

Fedzilla_Bob
05-17-2006, 07:17
In the 80's I would shoot Kodachrome 64, then have Cibachrome prints made from my favorites. Some of those prints lived on the walls of friends and family for years, showing little sign of fading. Cibachrome prints were awesome for their bright contrast and rich color. No interneg in the process.

I miss both products. It's very difficult to get Kodachrome developed now, and I don't know of anyone who prints Cibachrome. I'm not even sure it is being produced anymore. Does any one know?

jaapv
05-17-2006, 07:25
Try this link (http://www.cibachrome.nl/english/index_english.html) It is Ilfochrome now.

iliks
05-17-2006, 07:27
Ricard,
knowing that you're not alone is not a solution, but at least quite a relief :)

jaapv
05-17-2006, 07:57
And THESE (http://www.berufsfotografen.com/service_tipps_mix/mix_001.htm) are Kodachrome labs, also in th USA (sorry, in German)

dmr
05-17-2006, 08:02
I live near Chicago, in the USA, and my situation is exactly the same. I can only buy slide film from New York through the mail, and then I send it off to Arizona for slide processing by Fuji labs.

Hmmmm ... I find it kind of hard to believe that in the Chicago area, slide film is not available over the counter, ditto for convenient processing.

I live literally out in the sticks between Omaha and Lincoln, and there are countless places (Target', Wally World) that sell at least some slide film (Elite Chrome), and the two branches of the area's remaining "real" camera shop has a good stock of Ektachrome and Fuji and such.

(at least) Two labs in the area, both right on the way to work, easy drive, do same day E6. I'm sure there are several doing it in a larger market such as Chicago.

Trius
05-17-2006, 14:49
Ricardo:Helix? (http://www.helixphoto.com/home.html) .... Central Camera? (https://www.central-camera.com/search_results.asp?txtsearchParamTxt=&txtsearchParamCat=16&txtsearchParamType=ALL&txtsearchParamMan=ALL&txtsearchParamVen=104&txtFromSearch=fromSearch&btnSearch.x=7&btnSearch.y=9) .... Wolf/Ritz? (http://www.wolfcamera.com/35mm-slide-film.htm?bct=t13031003%3Bcifilm-cameras-and-accessories%3Bcifilm) ... Central and Helix are (or at least were) a treat to visit. Bring your Beano, cuz you'll get GAS.

RicardoD
05-17-2006, 14:53
Ok, guys, I should have said in my immediate area in my tiny suburb of Chicago, meaning the corner Walgreens and Target! :D

Yes, I can get slide film at Helix and the other places you mentioned and one hour processing not too far away. I would love to shoot a roll of Kodachrome before it totally disappears.

rumbliegeos
05-17-2006, 15:25
Like Oldprof I have used slides in teaching for many years, and I do fieldwork that usually involves shooting 1000-1200 each summer. But I am making the transition to Powerpoint for teaching now, and will take a digital camera this summer (along with less film than usual). I have always liked slides because, as long as you use fine grain film, and good lenses, you can economically shoot a huge number of high-quality images that take little space to store and are relatively easy to sort. I know digital files are even easier to sort and search for if named and indexed, but you have to be more systematic in your cataloging.

I also agree that slide shows of family photos are fun, and large, transmitted light photos have a special effect missing from small prints.

For the last few years I have really enjoyed shooting Provia 100 F in a Leica with a coated Summitar, and I'll keep doing that as long as the film is available and not overly expensive.

Terence T
05-30-2006, 15:30
There's always a roll of 100VS living in one of my bodies at any time, usually in the xpan or the Mamiya 7. I used to shoot b/w Agfa Scala transparencies until Agfa decided to quite the film business altogether... pity, that was some amazing stuff.

Finder
06-09-2006, 23:39
There's always a roll of 100VS living in one of my bodies at any time, usually in the xpan or the Mamiya 7. I used to shoot b/w Agfa Scala transparencies until Agfa decided to quite the film business altogether... pity, that was some amazing stuff.

I just got the latest B&H photo catalog and it lists Agfapan Scala 200 in 35mm and 120 rolls. There is other Agfa as well.

Finder
06-09-2006, 23:45
Since color prints are what I am after, I shoot color negative film. Since I run my own color darkroom, printing is fairly inexpensive.

Dfin
06-10-2006, 19:18
I pretty much shoot colour neg. usually 400 fuji. But the last couple of rolls,the sky/clouds have been disappointing, so I might swing back to slide film

thawkins
06-10-2006, 20:08
I enjoy using a Kodak Retina 2a whenever I can. A roll of Sensia (!00 speedFuji) is in this camera right now. Other rangerfinders in my arsenal include a Retina !a and a CAnon QL17. Each one gets a roll of transparency at least once a year. Aids the digestion.

Tom

kully
06-22-2006, 08:00
haven't shot a roll of slide film in twenty years or so. Haven't realy shot film in 5 years either. Maybe I will try a roll of slide again just for fun. John

How come you've got film cameras then? :) Can I have them?

I've only recently discovered the joys of slide film, however it is expensive compared to C41.

Actually, since I started developing myself HP5+ is all I use.

Still I've got ten rolls of Provia 100F and 400F each in the freezer for my two-week holiday starting Saturday. B&W is cool, but sometimes you want to know what colour things were too.

bobkonos
06-22-2006, 09:54
Hello All,

This is my first reply/post/whatever, so I hope I follow correct ettiquette. Yes, I use slide film at least 75% of the time in my rangefinder cameras. I still love giving slide shows, guess it is the "old school" in me. I use Fujichrome Velvia and Provia exclusively with wonderful results. I have not used the venerable Kodachrome 64 in many many years-shall I try it again?

Hope this helps. Glad to be a part of the RFF!

narsuitus
07-11-2006, 20:54
For years, I shot a lot of slide film. I would buy 35mm slide film in 100-foot rolls, E-6 chemistry in 5-liter kits, roll my own film, and processed my own 35mm and 120 slides. However, finding E-6 chemistry locally has become impossible and shipping “hazardous chemicals” has become cost prohibitive.

I now shoot a lot more print film.

Nachkebia
07-11-2006, 21:06
always, but I have just put my first slide on my first rangefinder :)

john51
07-11-2006, 22:47
Yes I do, I have just gone back to slide film after a few years shooting digital. I much prefer the vibrant colours of slide film. The scans also seem so much smoother, with more natural colours, when printing on an inkjet.

Also there is nothing that compares with a projected slide for colour and detail!

Regards, John.

JoeFriday
07-12-2006, 12:26
I was avoiding slide film for a while since the processing cost is 2-3 times that of C41.. but having recently revisited 'chromes, I remember what makes them special.. virtually no grain, and amazing colors.. slides have a depth to them that print film can rarely capture

whitecat
07-13-2006, 14:41
Let's all go back to chromes for a wek.

Rafael
07-18-2006, 07:14
I do shoot slides occasionally, but pretty rarely these days. I'm a big fan of Provia F. I went through a phase of shooting it almost exclusively a few years back. I also love Scala and, when I was living in Toronto, was lucky enough to have a lab near by that would process it. But these days, it's mostly B&W prints for me. And, as I only have one RF body, I can't load two films at the same time (I don't really enjoy lugging my two EOS 1n bodies around for a day of shooting). But this thread has got me thinking that maybe I should get back to shooting slides more often.

SolaresLarrave
07-18-2006, 07:49
Slide film rules... It's simply the best there is.

Problem is... if you can't project the stuff, viewing slides in one of those small viewers is kind of a pain for others. And they get dirty very easily too (the viewers, I mean).

But then... there's nothing like them! :)

jaapv
07-18-2006, 08:17
I just got myself twelve rolls of Kodachrome 64 to say a farewell to film in style (well, not quite, I am keeping my M6TTL and it likes to be used) Now I'm hunting for suitable subjects, but sadly with a strongly diminished lens arsenal, my Summaron 3.5, 3.5cm and Elmar LTM 4.0/9cm. All the rest I sent on vacation to Solms to be coded.

robert blu
09-06-2006, 11:32
For me, one of the relaxing/stisfying moment of my life is when I put on my table the light box (my one is reasonable wide) and I pt on it the slides. Then with a lens I start looking at and commenting this is good. this one s..t I should heve focus better, that bis great etc etc. This is a moment than even when I have some personal trouble let me forget other things, and it is simply...magic.
Magic ? I also (re) discover the pleasure to project slides on a screen and comment them together with my wife. Photography is important as part of our life, is great, is magic. The ongoing competition betwen me and my wife in taking pleasure adds something... grande ! LONG AND HAPPY LIFE TO SLIDES !

David Murphy
09-06-2006, 12:22
I shoot it all the time, both E6 and Kodachrome. Walmart will process and mount a 36 exposure roll of either E6 or Kodachrome (yes, Kodachrome) for $4.75 plus tax. I also use mailers like Fuji, purchased on eBay for about $4 each. Film can be had on eBay at very modest prices. If you go to the big camera stores, you can expect to get ripped off, especially with processing, and particularly with Kodachrome.

Also, some other chains like Rite Aid and Ritz Photo (here in California) have reasonable slide processing prices (like about $7-8 a roll) - this is sometimes more convenient since Walmarts are fewer here than in other parts of the USA since local politicians have decided getting such good deals from Walmart is harmful to us.

I scan my slides with a Minolta diMage scanner and incredible color images are the result !

thelovecollect
09-07-2006, 06:12
yeah i shoot slide. could never get great scans from color negs..
processing is fast too, less than 3 hours in some labs..

DMG
09-28-2006, 12:21
never shoot colour print, only B&W and slide (usually astia or velvia) and nearly always shoot a roll of one and then swap to the other and always have one camera loaded with one and another with the other that way all bases covered (sort of)

clintock
09-28-2006, 14:30
Color print film goes in the point n shoots, slide and bw in the proper cameras. I really hope kodak will do something like sell the kodachrome gear to poland or something so it will continue to exist at least a little bit..
Some of those newer t grain kodak films seem ok though.

nightfly
09-29-2006, 12:27
I use if for cross processing mostly. To me cross-processed grainy slide film is kinda more like the black and white version of color film.

Just bought some Kodak Elite Chrome to check out the Chihuly thing up at the New York Botanical garden with the intent of cross processing it. I like the way it looks XP'd.

bmicklea
09-29-2006, 13:13
Like some others here I still shoot transparencies regularly. If I'm looking for a good all-around slow film I go with Provia 100F. But (ready your tomatos) I also love Kodak E200 pushed to 400 or 800. I find it's fantastic for dusk shots which is when I do a lot of my shooting, because it takes on a warmer more purplish cast that tends to emphasize the dusk colours I already love. As a word of warning though it isn't as sharp as more "modern" transparency films and has a definite grain to it when pushed. I've gotten some fantastic prints from it, though you mileage might vary...

teo
09-29-2006, 23:20
Slides is what made me go from digital to film. The funny thing is that wasn't me who decided, but my girl, that hates to look at photos on a computer.

woodphoto
10-24-2006, 14:20
For color I shoot Kodak portra (vc, nc) and got addicted to the Kodak 100UC on trips to San Fran, (my wife loves the way she looks in it). I shoot E6 rarly and only on my 645's, 'cause they look cool on the light box. Otherwise its all B&W

photocrazy
10-25-2006, 15:19
Since more and more labs are digital-printing negatives nowadays, I have switched to slides completely. Mainly using provia 100f and sensia 100 for 135 and provia 100 and velvia 50 for 120. The good news is that Fuji may resume the production of velvia 50 next year.

telenous
10-25-2006, 15:46
I use more and more slide film for my colour photos. I have only just discovered Kodachrome and I intend to shoot it for as long as it is available in Europe. Other than that I am quite taken with the natural colours of Agfa Precisa 100 (another one that will be soon gone) while I also like Fuji Provia 400.

Most of the times I shoot slides on my SLR but occasionally I will use it also in my rangefinders. Some of the latest rf lenses really do excel in colour also.

ClaremontPhoto
10-26-2006, 02:01
Ten year old Fuji Sensia E6, developed in C41 is interesting.

GeneW
10-26-2006, 05:06
Those of you who shoot slide film regularly, when you get it processed, do you get your slides mounted or do you get them uncut so you can prepare strips for scanning? If the latter, do you cut and mount individual slides?

For me getting slides mounted is nice, but I haven't yet figured out a good slide storage system. Strips of film fit into my Printfile system nicely.

Gene

DougK
12-08-2006, 14:09
Those of you who shoot slide film regularly, when you get it processed, do you get your slides mounted or do you get them uncut so you can prepare strips for scanning? If the latter, do you cut and mount individual slides?

For me getting slides mounted is nice, but I haven't yet figured out a good slide storage system. Strips of film fit into my Printfile system nicely.

Gene
I usually get full-frame 35mm slides mounted and store them in sleeves kept in binders. Half-frame I do as develop-only, cut into strips myself, scan the strips, and then cut and mount the strips.

Medium format transparency I treat like negative film: develop, cut, and sleeve.

summaron
12-08-2006, 17:31
I'll shoot Kodachrome 200 until the bitter end.

It's sharp, has nice hard grain and nails down odd, offbeat colors like nobody's business.

It's expecially effective under florescent and odd mixes of mercury vapor and other light. It's the tri-x of color film.

Trius
12-08-2006, 18:03
summaron: Good to know; I've never tried the 200, hadn't heard much discussion of it, actually. I'll have to try it. PhotoEngineer (Ron) over on APUG once spoke of a Kodachrome 400, based on T-grain emulsion, that never made it to market. (Ron was a chemical engineer at Kodak and was involved in R&D with Kodachrome.) He said it was fantastic. What sadness.

summaron
12-09-2006, 11:00
Trius, be forewarned that K200 has a maddeningly pinkish cast. But the pictures it gets right are better--richer and "righter"--than those I get with my other two color favorites for low light shooting (usually at 1/5 & 1/2 sec at f2.8), Portra 400NC and Fuji NPZ.

Thanks for the story about K400. It's a miracle anyway having Kodachrome around at all, sort of as if Facel Vegas or Delahayes were still being made.

Trius
12-09-2006, 12:49
Thanks for the tip. Sounds like something PS could cure if scanning were involved. Now I'm quite intrigued to try it out for some of my super-low-light Irish pub/jam session shots.

Robert
12-09-2006, 13:03
I shot a lot of colour slide film with my G2 until I bought the E1, now I rarely use slide film. Mostly black and white

mw_uio
12-27-2006, 10:53
Ektachrome 100VS! and love it!


Cheers

Mark
Quito, EC

rbsinto
12-27-2006, 11:53
I just got my first ever rangefinder, a Nikon S3 about ten days ago, but all I plan to run through it is Fuji Sensia II 100 ISO colour slide,which is (except for Ektachrome 400 pushed one stop for those really low light conditions) all I currently use in my motorized Nikon F, motorized F2AS and motorized FA.
Really, for me, there is no need for other films.

JonathanA
12-27-2006, 12:22
I've never been too big of a fan of slide film...or anything color for that matter.

serpia
01-01-2007, 18:44
I don't operate my own darkroom, so if I want color it will be from a commercial processor.

Over the years I tried various local labs, and I just got tired of bad results. I would get prints with bad color casts, or bright images printed as 18% gray. All black and white would come back printed in dull shades of mud. I was not trying to have my negatives processed at the cheapest place possible, I was willing to pay for good quality development and printing. I am sure such quality labs are out there, but I never found them.

Using slide film lets me see my images without the interference of bad lab techs or machine prints. If I want color then I use slide film. I use color print film only when I want the exposure lattitude.

dspeltz
01-09-2007, 12:30
I have Kodachromes, Ektacrhomes, Agachromes, Panatomic X slides from as far back as 40 years ago. 10,000 or more. the Kodachromes are magnificent, the Panatomic as well, the Agfa and the Ektacromes are DOA. I just bought a pile of Kodachrome 64 and 100 rolls of 120 Scala for the freezer. Slide machines and trays are going for a song. Since I am in my 60's I figure I can make this work another few years and then it wont matter, but slides are still what makes people gasp when projected in the right environment. There was an article in tne New Yorker last week lamenting the deterioration of good movies seen in big theaters. Instead Hollywood is moving toward (bad) movies for the IPod and downloadable to TV. I think big room slide shows are going the same way. Sad, but grab and use it while you can.

They are beautiful. color or B&W.

Biggles
01-21-2007, 11:08
Never.

I've never bought a roll of slide film in my life, except for the time someone sent me out mith their SLR to take slides of some artwork for them. (Oh, wait; bought a roll of Fuji 120 slide film, once, for a photo club nighttime project.) Hell, I barely use color.

It's funny, though, because my old man was a monster slide photographer from the 40s through the mid-70s, and I saw gobs of nice, sharp, correctly-exposed Kodachromes and Ektachromes as a kid, all taken through a 50mm f/3.5 Color-Skopar on a Prominent. He gave me that camera around 1981, and I promptly banged a roll of Tri-X into it and went crazy.

I guess I've always preferred the immediacy and versatility of the pocketable, instantly-displayable snapshot.

estepan99
01-21-2007, 12:53
Of all Film I have tried so far, Sensia gives absolutely the best results when scanned with my Epson 4180 flatbed.

So for Color I use Sensia 100 and for B&W I use XP2 or Delta 100, the last one to process by my own to provide scratchfree negs.

Stephan

Bryce
05-28-2007, 14:33
I quit using slide film several years ago when it became painfully clear that the little gems are absolutely worthless.
Properly exposed slides are so, so perfect to look at on the light table. But when you actually go to do something with them, i.e. make a print or any other viewable reproduction, the magic is lost; I've tried scanners ranging from a Scan Dual III to an Imacon; the Imacon and high end Nikon scanners get close, but still can't deal with the high density portions of a slide, and all suffer from noise.
I've since seen wet, optically enlarged prints that seem to have actually gotten the beauty of the slide onto paper. But it came too late, and now I don't even know if there's a place to have such prints made.
The ones I've seen that looked really nice to my eye said Fuji Crystal Archive on the back. Anyone know if this material is still available, whether anyone still offers prints made on it, or whether using it in a home darkroom is feasible?
Anyway, I gave up. On the rare occasion that I shoot color I either use print film and live with mediocre scans or shoot digital.

Steve Bellayr
05-28-2007, 14:56
I have a kodak slide projector and about 200 slides. I haven't looked at them in years. There's a unused roll in the frig. 1980's was the last time I took slides.

sepiareverb
05-28-2007, 14:56
I've got a G2 body dedicated to Kodachrome right now- ten rolls for the spring & summer & fall if it lasts. I love to shoot slides (Kodachrome now, often Velvia, E100 or my now precious few rolls of Agfa RSX) for our family 'snaps'.
The upside is the rare 'slide show' where we set everything up, and roll through a bunch of trays on the Pradovit. Something really great about these nights, something I recall very vividly as a kid- seeing the slides. Something about once a year, but a special occassion for sure.

css9450
05-28-2007, 16:05
I've used Provia 100 and later 100F since 1997, after previously dabbling in it a little for a couple years. Used Kodachrome 25 and 64 before that, going back to 1978.

I don't think I've shot more than about 10-12 rolls of prints in my life; lately the only times I ever use print film is if I'm shooting something for my employer (it paid off though - they used my pics to illustrate their latest sales brochure).

mw_uio
05-28-2007, 16:11
E100VS / Velvia 50 / Provia 100F / Provia 400F / Sensia 400 / Kodachrome 64.

I do want to try some Velvia 100.

cheers

MArk
Quito, Ec

nikon_sam
05-28-2007, 16:47
I have two cartons (36 ex. 20 rolls) of the original Velvia 50 in the fridge...
I love slide film...I need to get some outta there and shoot it...

dmr
05-28-2007, 17:52
I've tried scanners ranging from a Scan Dual III to an Imacon; the Imacon and high end Nikon scanners get close, but still can't deal with the high density portions of a slide, and all suffer from noise.

I'll share with you (and anybody else who wants to listen it) what I do, but I'm not sure this is what you want to hear. :) Now before you go dismissing this, please take a good look at some good sample prints made on the latest higher-end printers that use the new pigment inks.

Before you stop reading, please hear me out for one more brief paragraph. Up until about a year ago I too was of the belief that only an optical lab print was what I wanted for my best photos, and even though I had learned to make my then printer the best it could be, the prints were "OK" at best, and that no {gasp - dare I use this word} inkjet could rate the Charles Atlas Seal of Approval. This was until I started looking closely at some of the sample prints which they assured me were not tweaked and were actually printed on those models. The model that caught my eye was the HP 9180, which I eventually purchased. You can stop reading now if you want. :)

As for scanning and noise and mud in the shadows, for slides I do almost all Kodachrome 64 (and yes, the 9180 prints do have that "Kodachrome look from scanned Kodachrome slides) and I've found the trick to getting a good scan with minimal noise is to scan at 16 bits, absolute maximum res, and overscan to the max, like 8 or 16 times. The overscanning (multi sample) is what seems to do the trick for shadow noise on slides. This is with a K-M SD IV, which is admittedly an entry-level now-orphan scanner which has a fairly steep learning curve at the onset. This will take several minutes per slide, and give you a monstrodious file of about 75-80 megabytes, but the results are worth it.

One other thing I do on some slides is to do a couple quickie test scans to check the focus. Slides can curve and the autofocus doesn't always grab the best point on the slide to focus onto. I'll sometimes have to re-set the autofocus point if the edges or the center starts to get fuzzy.

Another thing, do no tweaking of the image on the scanner software other than some slight levels. Yeah, some slides don't want to correct very well, and for those, it seems you can never ever get a nice print from the, digital or optical. Just get the maximum information off the slide and into your computer. Then use Photoshop or whatever to do the tweaks and make a "press ready" .psd or .tif which your printer doesn't have to futz with to print at the size you want. I size it to 300DPI at EXACTLY the size of image I want.

Still reading? :)

The ones I've seen that looked really nice to my eye said Fuji Crystal Archive on the back. Anyone know if this material is still available, whether anyone still offers prints made on it, or whether using it in a home darkroom is feasible?

Crystal Archive is a very good paper. Pro labs and minilabs use this quite a bit.

I'm very sure Fuji does not make a type R Crystal Archive paper. If you got a Fuji Crystal Archive print from a slide, it was either with an internegative (lose one turn) or more likely in the last several years it was scanned, inverted in software, and then optically printed on the paper.

For paper, I have been getting some stunning prints from the 9180 using the Ilford Galerie series, such as the Smooth Pearl. The various house brand Office Depot papers work very well with this printer too.

Sorry this is so long, I just kept adding and adding. :) Hope you find it of at least some interest. :)

adietrich
05-28-2007, 18:11
Yes, I do shoot slide film with my Rollei TLR. A lot. As with many other things: Size DOES matter! :-)

Efke 25 processed by dr5 as slide
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=63742

Astia 100
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=63743

-a

Rhoyle
05-28-2007, 18:56
I go through phases. When I do b+w it's usually PlusX in D76. It scans well and I like the tonality. For color, I usually use Kodak E100G. I've tried most of the others, but I like the saturation and color balance of the E100G. I find it easy to scan and get the prints to look the way I want them.

BH

mackigator
05-28-2007, 19:08
Three cheers for slide film! Fuji 100f and 400x.

Sisyphus
05-28-2007, 19:25
I mostly use black and white film, however, I completed one project, all night images, which was all photographed on Fuji Provia 400 pushed to 800 and 1000 ASA, and Kodachrome 200 with on camera flash.

I plan on traveling a bit this summer, and plan to photograph using all kodachrome. I have recently been inspired by Alex Webb's work, and want to experiment a little, but most of my work will be b&w.

Bryce
05-28-2007, 21:30
DMR-
Thank you for your reply, and especially for the time taken for detail! I read it fully, and twice, by the way.
I believe that I read somewhere that the only direct positive paper still available for optical enlargement is Ciba- or Ilfo- chrome, whichever it is called at this point. From what I've read about it, it sounds like more trouble (masks and chemical disposal worries) and expense than I'm willing to endure. Plus, it might just disappear right when I get a handle on it.
I have seen some really good inkjet prints in the last couple of years, so since I gave up on color. I know they exist, and only sorting through what works and what doesn't stops me, though cash is rather tight lately too. Some are good enough to give analog B+W's a run for their money.
The biggest problem I've had is with digitizing the slide's contents, i.e. scanning.
I've suspected that my scanner, a Scan Dual III, might have a weak light source, since anything resembling a shadow in the slide is rendered pitch black on screen. To counter this, I have to up the exposure at the scan, usually 2 stops. Even so, the scan doesn't register anything like the darker areas in the slide.
And those chalk white whites that Astia gives come out looking green or pink or something on screen, though P-shop makes quick work of that.
I always used the very buggy software provided with it.
I did notice that the manual focus option was far more reliable than the automatic one, and scanned 16 bits with multiple passes. As I remember, 4x sampling was the most the software would allow you to select. Do more than that help noticeably with noise?
Anyhow, I later took some classes at the local university, which is where I gained access (temporarily) to Nikon 4000's and an Imacon. While I found myself without nearly enough time to get truly familiar with either of them, they both turned out considerably better files than the little Minolta. Maybe even marginally better than with a 6mp digital camera...
About the same time, I was beginning to play with what has become my native format- medium, that is. Well, that left scanning right out of my league. A Nikon 8000 or 9000 has always been about $2000 to buy, though from a 6 by whatever slide the results would be perfectly acceptable.
After all that, and also near instant gratification from medium format negs in the darkroom providing stunning, pin sharp B+W prints I just decided color either wasn't my bag or that digital would someday fix things.
It wasn't until later that I saw prints that had been made optically from slides. Now I can't help feeling I missed something with the passing of these materials.
Laying around my house are a few thousand slides, some of which are really nice. A month or so I finally got around to 'scanning' a 645 slide of a friend with a dslr, bellows arrangement, and enlarging lens. I took 3 frames, one exposed for midtones, one for highlights, and one for shadows, then melded them in a piece of free HDR software.
All I can say bad about the result is, too bad the camera's native resolution is so low. Otherwise the image is great. There are no noise problems, no density problems, no color problems. A web sized version of the image is in the 'She/ He's a beauty' thread.
So there's hope. Sooner or later I'll probably brave the word of color imaging, and maybe even by way of slides. There is still a ton of my personal favorite film, Astia, in the freezer.
Thanks again for your response!

Bryce
05-28-2007, 21:35
Adietrich-
Those are pertty!

Gordon Coale
05-28-2007, 21:44
I'm trying some Kodachrome 64 for the first time in 20 years or so. I have a roll in my Leica IIIc and a roll in a Nikon F3 a friend is loaning me. I recently scanned some Kodachrome my grandfather took in 1949 in the Leica IIIc I now have. Pretty amazing.

adietrich
05-29-2007, 07:52
Adietrich-
Those are pertty!


Thanks, Bryce. You should seem them projected, its almost unbelievable.

On slide scanning: I get "kinda OK" results when I scan 35mm slides with my Epson3200. But life is getting much easier with the 120's. I can scan with a more moderate resolution and the prints turn out just great.

-a

Tuolumne
05-29-2007, 08:01
I have gone back and forth between slide film and color negative film in my rf cameras. I am now on a big slide film kick. I love its look and the fact that what you expose is what you get. Fewer variables affect the final outcome.

/T

dmr
05-29-2007, 09:37
Thank you for your reply, and especially for the time taken for detail! I read it fully, and twice, by the way.

Thanks. I'm glad you took it in the spirit intended.

There's really a lot of bias among film users toward optical prints, and it seems like many don't even want to consider anything other than wet prints. I think this comes from the "almost photo quality" printers of 5-10 years ago.

I believe that I read somewhere that the only direct positive paper still available for optical enlargement is Ciba- or Ilfo- chrome, whichever it is called at this point.

I don't do any wet printing (yes, I have done it at college and using friends' darkrooms, plus I've done my share of hand-dipped Kodalith) but from what I've picked up, Ilford does still make type R paper. It's not direct positive. It has to be exposed, developed, re-exposed, bleached, etc to do a reversal.[/quote]

Years ago I used to get type R prints done which were sent to the Kodak lab over at Fair Lawn, NJ. They always came out very nice.

I've suspected that my scanner, a Scan Dual III, might have a weak light source, since anything resembling a shadow in the slide is rendered pitch black on screen. To counter this, I have to up the exposure at the scan, usually 2 stops. Even so, the scan doesn't register anything like the darker areas in the slide.

Hmmmm ... it's too bad those are orphan and can't be sent in for a calibration or repair. I have the 4, which always seems to give good details in the shadows if there are indeed details there.

I always used the very buggy software provided with it.

Although I've been very outspoken about these as being unnecessary, you might try the demo of Vuescan or Silverfast. The software I have with the IV is not that bad. I do think they try to put too many features in this type of thing, but it still seems to do the basic job well, to get the image off the slide (or neg) and into the computer.

I did notice that the manual focus option was far more reliable than the automatic one, and scanned 16 bits with multiple passes.

I've never had to use the full manual. I've always been able to get by setting the focus point for the auto focus.

As I remember, 4x sampling was the most the software would allow you to select. Do more than that help noticeably with noise?

I think the most difference is between 1x and 2x, but more can't hurt. Mine (the IV) lets you do up to 16.

venchka
06-11-2007, 14:56
I shoot slide film all the time. Finished a roll yesterday. Doesn't everybody?

ully
06-11-2007, 16:29
I shot a couple dozen rolls of Velvia in the past year. Kodachrome it ain't but is still quite good.

payasam
06-20-2007, 00:54
I protest: there's no "No Longer" option.

foto_fool
06-20-2007, 13:18
I shoot mostly B/W in my 35mm RFs, color print in my SLR and Hexar AF, and almost exclusively color transparency in my MF cameras.

I have been reasonably satisfied with Provia 100 and am happy that Velvia 50 is available again - though I still have a couple rolls of Provia in the fridge to work through before I need to order.

Joop van Heijgen
06-23-2007, 04:21
I do use slide film for more than 30 years! I use M Leica and Leica reflex cameras.

I use mostly Ektachrome 100; Elitechrome 100 and the Fuji Velvia 100F


The color and the sharpness are still the best!
The results are always outstanding!
Digital pictures of the top digital cameras of Nikon of Canon are not better, I saw this week!

Slide presentation on screen (3 meter) proves the enormous quality of the slide film (and the Leica lenses)!

Rob-F
07-03-2007, 07:59
Velvia 100; Provia 100F; Provia 400. I'm experimenting with Astia. The first roll was too thin and washed out looking. I shot the second roll at 125 for a substantial improvement. Looks to me like this film is rated too low. I experiment with Ektachrome from time to time. Used to use EPP 100 for blue springs and streams with green foliage, but at $15.00 a roll . . .

doitashimash1te
07-14-2007, 04:04
I will shoot Kodachrome 64 as long as it is available. I make sure I always have plenty of it in my freezer. Found out that I have only 5 rolls left, so yesterday I ordered 30 rolls for 350 euro (approx. $470) which is not a lot of money considering processing is included in the price.

rbsinto
07-14-2007, 04:26
I can't be bothered to scroll through seven pages of posts to see if I've replied to this thread before or not, but on the chance that I haven't, the only film I shoot is colour slide, virtually all 100 ISO, except for the odd roll of 400 pushed one stop for low light.
My film of choice is Fuji Sensia II spooled in 36-shot loads and sold under the house-brand name Memories, for a chain of stores here in Canada called Black's, which is owned (but soon to be sold off) by Fuji.

vmo
07-14-2007, 05:57
I alternate depending on the weather. Right now I got B/W in my M6 and 100SW in my Minox EL. It's cloudy so no use shooting color slides outdoors in my daily routs.

jjovin
08-12-2007, 15:13
I used to use Kodachrome 25 and now I use Kodachrome 64.
Kodachromes are probably the best films ever made.
Kodak just did a lousy job promoting it,
as seems to be the case with most things they do, I am sad to say.
On occasion I use, E100G, Provia100, Velvia100.
Zoran

GeneW
08-12-2007, 17:40
I can't be bothered to scroll through seven pages of posts to see if I've replied to this thread before or not, but on the chance that I haven't, the only film I shoot is colour slide, virtually all 100 ISO, except for the odd roll of 400 pushed one stop for low light.
My film of choice is Fuji Sensia II spooled in 36-shot loads and sold under the house-brand name Memories, for a chain of stores here in Canada called Black's, which is owned (but soon to be sold off) by Fuji.
Is the Blacks Memories package any cheaper than buying Sensia II at a place like Downtown Camera? Downtown is pretty reasonable on processing if you purchase it at the same time as the film.

Gene

LeicaTom
08-13-2007, 03:05
I have a roll of E6 to C41 *Crossprocessed* in my 1946 "Half Race" Leica IIIC now....going to shoot indoors/outdoors PinUp stuff with three or four different lenses on Tues :)

Tom

photophorous
08-14-2007, 06:14
I bought my rangefinder, planning to use it mainly for B&W, and to continue using my D70s for color. After I shot a few rolls of B&W, and saw how sharp and detail rich the negatives where, I had to try some slide film. It's harder to use, but when it works, it works great! I just shot 9 rolls in Colorado...Provia 100F, Velvia 100f, and Astia. It kills the D70s.

Paul

Thea
08-14-2007, 07:08
I Have only discovered the quality of slide film quite recently, I have used it only in Medium Format, mainly pinhole. The quality compared to negative film is exceptional, however I have trouble getting decent quality prints, as alas I cant do this myself, so have to rely on the local processor.
I did get some pinhole slide images cross processed, they were quite whacky.

Is there anywhere in the UK you can get quality prints from slides for a reasonable price?
I have only used Fuji slide film, as its really the only one I can find readily, usually Velvia 50iso.

Is the difference between Slide & colour neg film that noticable with a 35mm RF?

Thea
08-14-2007, 07:11
"It Kills the D70s"
Have you tried the D80? This is THE best digital DSR, full stop.
The quality of colour images from the D80 is also exceptional...I love the metering!

mn4367
08-16-2007, 12:07
Still desperately trying to load my R-D1 with divine Kodachrome 25. Have to re-read the manual ...

Before going digital I used Kodachrome 64 95% of the time. KC 25 made up most of the rest. A very small amount was used when I got out of KC being somewhere abroad.

TheHub
08-16-2007, 13:35
Slide film and B&W, that's all I shoot (35mm & 120)
No color neg film - I don't like it.

topoxforddoc
08-16-2007, 13:42
Kodachrome is my only colour stock. Otherwise it's all B/W

Charlie

thomasw_
08-16-2007, 23:04
occasionally i shoot kodachrome 64; some of my favourite colour shots have been in k64. unfortunately it is very expensive and the price no longer includes the processing.....and the processing time is looooooong. oh, and another thing about slide film i agree with is that it is persnickety. accordingly i have to nail the aperature/shutter-speed or the colours go 'muddy' on me.

alcaraban
08-17-2007, 02:06
As my rangefinder has only full stops (both in speeds and aperture terms) I don't use slides. Besides that, I use it without batteries, so no meter, too.

Harry Lime
08-17-2007, 03:17
I used to shoot Kodachrome 25, 64 and 200. Love the way it looks, it reminds me of Technicolor. But processing has become a hassle and it's really expensive.

Harry Lime
08-17-2007, 05:47
Hey Alec -

When I was shooting K64 in Los Angeles I would drop it off at A&I (a pro lab) and had it back a few days later. Perfectly processed and relatively cheap. But then A&I shut down their Kodachrome processor and suddenly everything had to be shipped to Switzerland or some place in the midwest of the US (Kansas?) for processing. Turnaround time become 4-6 weeks.

That was a few years ago and in the meanwhile I've moved over to b/w for 99.9% of what I do.

Recently I moved to the UK and from what you are describing things seem to run a little smoother over here. I may just have to shoot a roll for the heck of it.

HL

leif e
08-17-2007, 06:13
As I started out many years ago I believed that only amateur snap shooters used negative film. By the late 80s I was shocked to learn that many newspapers here would prefer negs over slides (due to the increased tolerance, I guess).

Then; a couple of years ago, after picking up a RF camera again and after I started coming here, I started testing different C-41 films. And never looked back, really. My respect for the color rendition in Kodak´s Portra film is huge!

leif e

parco
08-17-2007, 06:58
I say there is nothing more satisfying than viewing a well exposed and color corrected slide with a top quality loupe. Anything else is a compromise ( black and white excepted). May slide film live forever.

yaadetgar
11-06-2007, 07:27
Hi!

I mostly do B/W when I do film (I'll NEVER do b/w on digital), but when I'm doing color, it's ALWAYS a slide film. I think the colors are much better in slides then in negatives.


Yaad.

peterm1
11-11-2007, 14:15
There is no doubt that slide film renders much nicer colors. There is also no doubt that its damnably hard to expose correctly and in contrasty situations, forget it. I started with slide film but either let my standards slip or accepted the reality of everyday shooting (depending on how you look at it) and now shoot negative film pretty well exclusively.

Michael P.
11-19-2007, 19:10
Hey, I tried to vote, but it says I already did. What's up?

Chris101
11-19-2007, 20:12
Hey, I tried to vote, but it says I already did. What's up?Me too. This thread's been around for 2 years, so I assume I did vote, but have forgotten about it. I still don't use slide film, fwiw.

minoltist7
11-27-2007, 05:17
I shoot slides with SLR only, becouse it's more accurate metering.
My Minolta Dynax has exposure indicator which shows over/underexposed zones in honeycomb pattern, BEFORE the shot was done. It helps a lot for metering in contrasty scenes, but especially for slides.
I think, RFs are more suitable for BW and "street photography" type, where metering doesnt make a sense

shadowfox
01-15-2008, 09:04
I'm warming up to slides. Especially since now I knew for a fact that I can shoot both E-6 and K-14 in 35mm and E-6 only in 120 and get them developed by Wal-mart. For not much money at all.

So far I've used years expired (big surprise huh?) slides and I love the look (even the color-shift). It's still sharp, grainless and it has that lovely vintage look.

kshapero
01-15-2008, 10:14
Used to do slides all the time. Went to Japan for 2 weeks in 1984 with my trusty Oly 35C (I think) My kids shown those slides to every neighbor on our block.

fidget
01-16-2008, 12:14
My local photographic society and all others in the region have just about finished with slides. My love of them also lessened when I saw a few entries in one of the last comps I entered, which were digital pics transposed onto slide, presumably just for the comp. The last place where true "you-get-what-you-took" thrived....now screwed with no-one wanting to make a stand and say "real slides only". What a pity.
Now the clubs have (or will) replace slides with digitally projected images.
These achieve the dizzy resolution of 1024x768. ...Apparently, this is progress.

Oops, was that a rant?

Peter_Jones
01-17-2008, 14:26
I like slides, but for SLR not RF. If I get a decent light meter I may use more slide film, even if just to check out how certain lenses render colour. I reckon I use slide film about 10% of the time, colour neg 20% , with B&W being the mainstay.

Sadly it is harder to get my favourite K64 now, and I am not keen on Velvia.

sooner
02-15-2008, 10:04
I just developed my first couple of rolls of the expired K64 that David Murphy sold to a bunch of us here. Had it back from Wal-mart in a week for $8 and change (for two rolls). It reaffirmed my love of slides, with vibrant colors and sharp images thanks, surprisingly, to the lens on my Minox 35GT. As an added bonus--I think--these slides should still look good after I'm dead and buried (I'm 41 now).

minoltist7
04-30-2008, 00:32
Don't shoot slides since there is no lab with E-6 process in my city.
Occasionally I shoot it when I'm in trip somewhere in Europe (if there is local processing available)

Pherdinand
06-29-2008, 08:27
heh, yesterday i went to a local photo store with a better-than-average film supply. I just wanted to ask them if they can develop 220 format slide film (they don't but they send all slide out to Fuji, thus it is possible).
Anyway.
The sho had kodachrome!!! Needless to say, they had it at a super high price - euro 15,80. That includes processing.
However, when i enquired about the price, the dude put a roll in its box in front of me while he checked the price. I picked it up and noticed immediately that it's out of date - april 2008. I told him Yo man, this film is old. He looked - yeah true!thanks for saying, let me check!
There were four outdated ones and four fresh ones. He looked very confused. Said hm-hm.
I say, so what are you going to do with these?
He says, hmm, discount. "Aanbieding."
"Aanbieding", i say, for how much?
Umm, eight euro.
So i got all four rolls (eight per roll, that is. Life's not THAT good!).
This is cheaper than anywhere else in the old Europe less sevendayshop which does not ship to NL.

varjag
07-01-2008, 14:17
€8 for Kodachrome with processing mailers sure ain't a bad deal Pherdinand. Enjoy them but don't get hooked, or you can end up like me, scavenging for deals around the world, including such exotic sources as Milwaukee and Qatar :)

But it sure great film for memories..

richdirector
07-02-2008, 02:37
My picture library only took slide - now its digital - i love shooting Velvia 100 (especially in duller UK)
Have put one through Horseman SW612 - big BIG
New Bessa will remain B&W

So Was always .... now rarely

richdirector
07-02-2008, 02:44
I'm warming up to slides.......
So far I've used years expired (big surprise huh?) slides and I love the look (even the color-shift). It's still sharp, grainless and it has that lovely vintage look.

You should try shooting Provia 100 overexpose by 1/2 stop and process as colour neg - great x-process shots. Just dont expect it to look straight otherwise fake x-pro in photoshop CS3

Rich

urban_alchemist
07-02-2008, 03:33
I've been shooting alot more slide film recently than I used to: mostly Velvia50 or Provia 100. And I have to say: I much prefer C-41 negatives. The colors on E6 tend to be brasher and much more saturated - show me a slide film that can do skin tones and subtle graduations like Kodak 160NC or Fuji Pro160S and I'll happily move tomorrow...

varjag
07-02-2008, 03:49
Try Astia 100f, and you better start moving :)

urban_alchemist
07-02-2008, 03:52
Try Astia 100f, and you better start moving :)

Guess I'll have to try that then... :p