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back alley
10-01-2005, 10:32
this month something a bit different...

it user's choice but with a twist...a tri-x twist.

yes, all photos posted need to be shot on tri-x film.

i was thinking about a more exotic film but tri-x has to be the most easy to procure.

so, let's see what you guys come up with this month.

joe

taffer
10-01-2005, 10:42
Good ol' tri-x ! :)

Been not really active in regard to RFF projects lately (since January more or less... :o) but as Tri-X is one of my two films in the fridge, I guess I'll be able to come up with something :D

captainslack
10-01-2005, 11:51
October Project? Cool band! Too bad they broke up.... :(

SolaresLarrave
10-01-2005, 12:43
We're the RFF forum, Manuel... what do you think?

Heck, we're nice too... Go ahead!

BTW, joe, can I use Scala? That's the only B&W film I have in stock right now... Pleeeeeeeease, joe, pretty please? ;)

MacDaddy
10-01-2005, 12:51
Yeah, being the noob here, all I have is Fuji Neopan SS 100 B + W. Permission to come on board, Cap'n?

Stephanie Brim
10-01-2005, 12:55
*Stephanie ponders getting some Tri-X and some reliable scanning...

SolaresLarrave
10-01-2005, 12:58
Hey, I have Neopan too... and the super fast Kodak T-Max 3200!

But I prefer Scala.

Socke
10-01-2005, 13:02
Yeah, just my luck!

I have a roll APX400 in one camera and Sensia100 in the other. 10 rolls HP5 in the fridge and yes, there is one roll Tri-X left, too.
My problem is developer! My Tetenal Ultrafin+ is good for one film, the last dose ID-11 is just enough to develop the APx100 1+3 and then I'm dry :-(
Only thing I get my hands on localy is Rodinal and Tetenal Neofin blue, hopefully my dealer stocks up soon

back alley
10-01-2005, 13:38
seeing how all you guys are so polite and asked so nicely...nah, it's tri-x this month!!


joe

thmk
10-01-2005, 13:38
Tri-X? That's great :) Need some D76, Socke? I have a 1 Gallon pack left because I am currently on Microdol-X.

Cheers
Thomas-Michael

einolu
10-01-2005, 14:02
I could continue shootin APX and just up the contrast in photoshop [and trick you] ;). Anyway, monday I will stop by a shop and pick up a roll (that will be strange, I havent bought film in months now that i bulk load). IM IN!

Kin Lau
10-01-2005, 18:52
Oh fun... I have Tri-X right now in 35mm, 120 and 4x5, and RF's in all three formats. Maybe I'll post one from each.

Will
10-01-2005, 19:51
seeing how all you guys are so polite and asked so nicely...nah, it's tri-x this month!!


joe

Joe,

Don't laught :bang: , but can I go C41 B&W?

Where do we post the photo? This tread or in the gallery?

back alley
10-01-2005, 19:54
pics can be posted in the gallery, look for the 'monthly photo project'.

if at all possible use tri-x as it's the only parameter set for this month's topic.

joe

Skinny McGee
10-01-2005, 20:12
oh goodie that's my favorite flavor !!!!!

JoeFriday
10-01-2005, 20:53
that's it? it just needs to be shot on Tri-X?

well, I guess I'm out since I don't have a home darkroom and the local labs only develop C-41

there's seriously no theme or anything? I don't get it

back alley
10-01-2005, 21:20
that's it? it just needs to be shot on Tri-X?

well, I guess I'm out since I don't have a home darkroom and the local labs only develop C-41

there's seriously no theme or anything? I don't get it


i thought i'd try something different this month joe.
it's a user's choice for the 'topic/subject' and the the theme is the type of film used.

next month it might be a certain focal length lens.

just trying to shake things up and see if i can generate some more interest in the monthly project.

joe

Stephanie Brim
10-01-2005, 21:23
Wait...JoeFriday is Brett. backalleyphoto is Joe. I think I have it now.

Anyway, I was going to suggest something. Brett, you could always send it to someone for developing. There are tons of us who do it who would most likely be happy to develop it and then send it back to you...not like it takes very long. I don't have as much experience with it as I'd like, but I'm a decent hand with Diafine and D76.

FrankS
10-01-2005, 21:35
just trying to shake things up and see if i can generate some more interest in the monthly project. joe

The only thing that will work for me is to know what the theme is 2 or 3 months ahead of time. I just don't have the necessary turn around time to participate like this. Wish I could, but no can do.

back alley
10-01-2005, 21:41
that might be arranged.

maybe 4 sets of 3 (months) at a time.

i may start a discussion tomorrow about the monthly projects and try to get some brainstorming going.

i am very open to new ideas about this.

joe

JoeFriday
10-01-2005, 22:00
I've always been intrigued by the projects in the past, but thought they involved too much forethought.. a letter and a shape or object.. I thought I would submit something if a photo happened to fit the criteria, but it was always an afterthought

perhaps you could open a thread and ask for future themes.. more vague concepts that people could go out and shoot, rather than just stumbling into.. altho it's possible that I'm just so obtuse that I can't foresee these situations.. it's been known to happen :)

possible 'vague' themes (feel free to combine any)..

steps
shadows
silhouettes
sadness
grafitti
reflections (lots of possibilities)
rain
dogs
body art
food/drinks
billboards

back alley
10-01-2005, 22:28
last year, before the end of the year, i did just that. i asked for some ideas for future topics.

it worked out well.

the original premise for the photo project was to stay shooting and submit only new pics.
the themes were meant to make it like an assignment and keep things fresh.

joe

Will
10-01-2005, 23:20
that's it? it just needs to be shot on Tri-X?

well, I guess I'm out since I don't have a home darkroom and the local labs only develop C-41

there's seriously no theme or anything? I don't get it

I have the same problem. Just find it hard to invest in a dark room when I am on rental.

pics can be posted in the gallery, look for the 'monthly photo project'.

if at all possible use tri-x as it's the only parameter set for this month's topic.

joe

Thanks Joe! ;)

Stephanie Brim
10-01-2005, 23:45
It was less than 50 bucks to get everything for developing black and white at home for me...if you get stuff from Ebay from the right people, you can probably get things for less. It really isn't that large of an investment. If you don't like doing it, there are always people here willing to take the stuff off you for decent money.

My tank cost 15 bucks, D76 and Fixer were another 15, got some bottles, a funnel, some clips to hang film, and a timer. Cost: 45 bucks. The Diafine was given to me by someone who wouldn't use it. I develop *all* my black and white in the washroom next to my bedroom and take the film out of the canisters in the bathroom close by.

It isn't very hard to do and you're so much more impressed with the film if you do it yourself...there's a pride to it. I highly recommend it. You're scared you're going to screw up at first and sometimes (http://pleasewipeyourfeet.com/photos/firstdevelopment/paperclipsign.jpg) you (http://pleasewipeyourfeet.com/photos/firstdevelopment/burgerkingvader.jpg) do (http://pleasewipeyourfeet.com/photos/firstdevelopment/littleguy.jpg), but it's a great learning experience. :)

Doug
10-01-2005, 23:57
Ok! I've got some 220 Tri-X that needs to be used, and a Fuji 645 that needs to be used... One film, one camera, one lens... :D

Will
10-02-2005, 01:14
It was less than 50 bucks to get everything for developing black and white at home for me...if you get stuff from Ebay from the right people, you can probably get things for less. It really isn't that large of an investment. If you don't like doing it, there are always people here willing to take the stuff off you for decent money.

My tank cost 15 bucks, D76 and Fixer were another 15, got some bottles, a funnel, some clips to hang film, and a timer. Cost: 45 bucks. The Diafine was given to me by someone who wouldn't use it. I develop *all* my black and white in the washroom next to my bedroom and take the film out of the canisters in the bathroom close by.

It isn't very hard to do and you're so much more impressed with the film if you do it yourself...there's a pride to it. I highly recommend it. You're scared you're going to screw up at first and sometimes (http://pleasewipeyourfeet.com/photos/firstdevelopment/paperclipsign.jpg) you (http://pleasewipeyourfeet.com/photos/firstdevelopment/burgerkingvader.jpg) do (http://pleasewipeyourfeet.com/photos/firstdevelopment/littleguy.jpg), but it's a great learning experience. :)

hi, how do you manage to get your bathroom light tight?

Stephanie Brim
10-02-2005, 01:17
Towels, actually. I double them up and put them over the windows...it's fine for decently slow (ISO 100-400 film I've tried) film. When I go about developing my Tmax 3200, I'll probably put the towels over and wait until it gets dark.

Roman
10-02-2005, 01:35
Will, for developing film you don't even need a light-tight room - just get a changing bag for loading the film into the tank, everything afterwards can be done in the light.

Roman

Stephanie Brim
10-02-2005, 01:50
Whoops, yeah, that's what I meant. Not that clear, am I?

The tank I use is light tight after I get the film in it, so I do all my developing in the washroom with a light on. :)

markinlondon
10-02-2005, 03:14
Yep, a changing bag and a kitchen sink for film does me OK. My darkroom is far from film-safe with lots of little light leaks, but it's OK at night.

Now, this month's project, let's see what's in the trusty M6TTL...

Ah, Tri-X, phew :)

BTW, I like Brett's suggestion of vague themes open to a wide range of interpretation. It could liven up the whole thing.

Mark

Kin Lau
10-02-2005, 05:04
Will, for developing film you don't even need a light-tight room - just get a changing bag for loading the film into the tank, everything afterwards can be done in the light.

Roman

I second that. That was the most expensive part of my darkroom before I got my enlarger, the changing bag. In a pinch, just crawl under a couple of blankets after dark to load the film (obviously doesn't work so well for our friends in warm climates).

SolaresLarrave
10-02-2005, 05:21
Encouraging comments, Stephanie. The problem to me is not getting chemicals and a setup but how to get the film canister open and stick the film in the spools. I'm particularly bad at it. Tried a long time ago...

In any case, back to the topic, I'll try to snatch a couple of rolls and see what I can do. These monthly projects, even on short notice, had the virtue of making me think along certain lines. The first year we did it these projects I learned a lot from the initial posts and even though some sounded next to impossible (like shadows in February), it was very instructive to see the things people came up with. My only problem: lack of a lab... But I'll see what to do. There's always Adorama! :) I have a couple of unused mailers...

Will
10-02-2005, 06:01
Whoops, yeah, that's what I meant. Not that clear, am I?

The tank I use is light tight after I get the film in it, so I do all my developing in the washroom with a light on. :)

Will, for developing film you don't even need a light-tight room - just get a changing bag for loading the film into the tank, everything afterwards can be done in the light.

Roman

Thanks for the encouragement, guys...

Will read off the net and see what I can do for my current situation.



I second that. That was the most expensive part of my darkroom before I got my enlarger, the changing bag. In a pinch, just crawl under a couple of blankets after dark to load the film (obviously doesn't work so well for our friends in warm climates).

My father told me long ago on this, I took it as a joke. Guess it is an internationally acceptable workflow... :D

back alley
10-02-2005, 07:03
i also rent. i now just develope the film and scan and if i want a print i email the file to my lab and pick it up the next day.

i use the bathroom, at night, and put an old towel under the door.

rover has a good trick of putting the film on the reel and then developing at a later time. i never thought of that before.
so now, i load up a tank or 2 and then process the film the next day, during the day and then i don't have to stay up all night.

joe

Toby
10-02-2005, 13:10
Will, for developing film you don't even need a light-tight room - just get a changing bag for loading the film into the tank, everything afterwards can be done in the light.

Roman


I have used a changing bag in the past but have always worried about the sweaty hands syndrome

If any London Based RFF members are reading this this could I take the opportunity to recommend Photofusion (http://www.photofusion.org/) in Brixton they charge an annual membership of 50 but charge 12/4 hours for developing space (bring your own developer) plus an enlarger to to make contacts with full professional driers etc. and 22 for 4 hours enlarger hire ( just bring paper ). I used them when I worked professionally and really can't recommend them enough.

Roman
10-02-2005, 13:13
Encouraging comments, Stephanie. The problem to me is not getting chemicals and a setup but how to get the film canister open and stick the film in the spools. I'm particularly bad at it. Tried a long time ago...



This is really easy if you don't open up the canister with a church key, but use a 'film picker' to ge the leader out of the canister - you can then cut away the tongue and start the film into the reel (provided you use plastic, not steel) in the light, and only after there are 1 or 2 inches of the film inside the reel you need to turn off the light and wind the whole film, always pulling out a few inches and immediately getting them on the reel and repeating that. Much easier than opening th canister and fumbling around with the lose film, trying to find the start and the entrance of the reel...

Roman

hoot
10-02-2005, 13:28
Why wouldn't this work with a metal spool, Roman?

Roman
10-02-2005, 13:34
Because with a steel reel the film is clipped/fixed to the center,and spooled onto it from inside outwars, so you'd have to pull out much more from the canister, ruining the first few shots on your roll of film.

Roman

Doug
10-02-2005, 13:38
If you leave the leader out when you rewind, I think this makes loading the reels later a lot easier. Usually you can feel/hear the leader come off the takeup spool and stop rewinding. Then when I take the cartridge out of the camera I mark that roll as exposed by tearing off part of the leader.

el_rico_es
10-02-2005, 14:54
Since we're on the topic, is 120 film difficult to develop at home? I have experience with 35mm, but none with 120/220 format..

Rick

TPPhotog
10-02-2005, 15:00
Another vote for leaving the leader out and I use a permanent marker pen to number the canister for shoot order & speed shot at (I like HP5+ anywhere between 200 and 1600). If I unload in a hurry and swallow the leader I use a film retriever to get it out again before loading the spirals.

For my bad habits loading spirals taking the top off the canister leads to all sorts of hell in the dark-bag ;)

Toby
10-02-2005, 15:22
If you leave the leader out when you rewind, I think this makes loading the reels later a lot easier. Usually you can feel/hear the leader come off the takeup spool and stop rewinding. Then when I take the cartridge out of the camera I mark that roll as exposed by tearing off part of the leader.


This is okay if you are organised but if you are out shooting a lot of film you do need a fool proof method of separating exposed rolls from unexposed rolls especially if you are under time pressure when changing film this needs a degree of finesse when the pressure's on. But if you are shooting less it's a great idea and one I've frequently used myself

back alley
10-02-2005, 15:28
i try to leave the leader out also. then at home i pull it out a bit and cut the leader off and i also round the corners a bit. this makes it go on to the reels so much easier.
i also round the corners after i cut the film into strips so it goes into the sleeves so much easier also.

joe

hoot
10-02-2005, 15:35
My camera bag has two front pockets. The left one's for unexposed film and the right one's for exposed film. During a single shoot, all rolls are of the same film, exposed at the same speed and ideally in the same lighting conditions, so there's no need to mark anything during the shoot. Admittedly, though, this has gotten me into trouble twice (not knowing which speed I'd exposed a roll of film at, and exposing another roll twice). In the former case, it was either 400 or 800 speed, so I developed at 600 with the stock diluted to 1+2 instead of 1+1. In the latter case, nothing could be done... randomness probably has no merit, but one of the photos was rather funny (http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=18713).

FrankS
10-02-2005, 15:43
And now back to the topic of our thread....

If we could establish the themes for the coming 4 months, that would certainly help me with my usual slow turn-over time for film to print. Heck, setting up the year ahead would be even better.

Doug
10-02-2005, 15:43
This is okay if you are organised but if you are out shooting a lot of film you do need a fool proof method of separating exposed rolls from unexposed rolls especially if you are under time pressure when changing film this needs a degree of finesse when the pressure's on. But if you are shooting less it's a great idea and one I've frequently used myselfHi Toby -- My "foolproof" way to quickly separate exposed from unexposed film is to keep them in separate compartments or pockets. Fresh film in the right pocket, exposed in the left, etc. Having part of the leader torn off is absolute verification, but slower to check since I put the exposed cartridges back in their film cans.

Exposed 120/220 is easy to identify visually but I still use separate pockets or bag compartments for speedier use.

jano
10-02-2005, 15:46
Is kodak 400TX same as TriX? I don't have the packaging of my last roll anymore, but the negative says "400TX" on it..

FrankS
10-02-2005, 15:48
Okay, I give up.

Doug
10-02-2005, 15:52
And now back to the topic of our thread....

If we could establish the themes for the coming 4 months, that would certainly help me with my usual slow turn-over time for film to print. Heck, setting up the year ahead would be even better.Frank, I agree. The only downside I can think of is that it makes it more tempting to snap the subject shots outside the assigned month. :) Hmmm... or is that your whole point?

back alley
10-02-2005, 15:53
Okay, I give up.


i just started a new thread for discussion on this matter.

joe

Toby
10-02-2005, 15:53
Hi Toby -- My "foolproof" way to quickly separate exposed from unexposed film is to keep them in separate compartments or pockets. Fresh film in the right pocket, exposed in the left, etc. Having part of the leader torn off is absolute verification, but slower to check since I put the exposed cartridges back in their film cans.

Exposed 120/220 is easy to identify visually but I still use separate pockets or bag compartments for speedier use.


But I'm a fool with no finesse who is highly disorganised so I just wind the films into the cannister