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dave lackey
02-05-2012, 06:45
Looks the RFF Postcard project was a huge success!

Now that a lot of folks have used various printers, I am looking for recommended postcard printers for my own work.

I would appreciate your kind thoughts on vendors you think did an excellent job!:angel:

rover
02-05-2012, 06:50
I am very happy with quality of the cards I got from moo.com. They are not the cheapest option, but much better that expected. Every bit a real professional postcard.

dave lackey
02-05-2012, 06:58
I am very happy with quality of the cards I got from moo.com. They are not the cheapest option, but much better that expected. Every bit a real professional postcard.


Hey, good morning!

I checked out moo.com and was wondering if you had a photo of your card so I can decide what to do. Couldn't afford to get into the project but I would like to send out a small number of cards to potential clients as advertising my documentaries.

BTW, how is the weather up your way? Spring is here at 70F and alternating days of cool/warm/rain/sun.:)

nighstar
02-05-2012, 06:58
i used moo.com too and liked my cards as well. they were very easy to make and the card stock + print was nice quality. :)

dave lackey
02-05-2012, 07:00
i used moo.com too and liked my cards as well. they were very easy to make and the card stock + print was nice quality. :)

Thanks, nighstar! That is two for Moo!:)

seakayaker1
02-05-2012, 10:06
Thanks, nighstar! That is two for Moo!:)

Dave, I used Moo.com for the postcard project. I have received many positive comments from folks who received the postcard also from family and friends that I have showed it to.

I would send you one but the ones that I had purchased have all been mailed.

The photograph on the card was a true representation, the stock was thick, and the ability to have the back designed was a bonus.

The photo I used can be found here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/6075200135/sizes/z/in/set-72157626799691570/

We will be posting them on-line in the Postcard Project thread in the near future.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

crawdiddy
02-05-2012, 11:16
I just checked out moo.com. Looks like a good service, alright.

Just curious-- did anyone make real darkroom prints, and perhaps glue them onto card stock with the address portion? If so, where did you get the postcard stock?

gb hill
02-05-2012, 11:33
Dave we're thinking right along the same lines. I didn't participate but spent some time reading through the threads last night & got excited about the project myself. With me being out of work for the time being I'm glad I didn't get involved. Monies tight right now, but may take part in the next one. I already have an idea for a postcard. I think Moo will be my choice. Go for Moo. Some had disappointments in the weight of the stock from other companies.

robert blu
02-05-2012, 11:38
One more vote for Moo. Good quality and service.
robert

jesse1dog
02-05-2012, 11:42
You might wait a bit to hear from the 'postcard' guys who did participate how the various cards went through the postal systems. Many of the cards I got were scuffed on the picture side. Depends what you intend to do with any postcards you produce. Maybe they don't need to go through the post. Maybe you don't need a postcard for a mailing shot - how about printing something on either the front or back or both of any envelopes you use - that's not very usual these days either.

jesse

Bob Michaels
02-05-2012, 12:07
Dave: I recommend 5x7 sheets of 60 pound stock Red River Polar Matte and an Epson printer (HP apparently will do). That paper is available in boxes of 100 sheets. Every year I print and mail out a winter holiday card with one of my photos on one side and a title / return address on the other side.

But I am one of those who want my photos exactly the way I see it, not some printers interpretation of my vision.

dave lackey
02-05-2012, 12:27
Dave: I recommend 5x7 sheets of 60 pound stock Red River Polar Matte and an Epson printer (HP apparently will do). That paper is available in boxes of 100 sheets. Every year I print and mail out a winter holiday card with one of my photos on one side and a title / return address on the other side.

But I am one of those who want my photos exactly the way I see it, not some printers interpretation of my vision.

Bob, that is an excellent recommendation!

Jamie Pillers
02-05-2012, 13:38
MOO... definitely. I used them for The Postcard Project here. Great prints, very nice prices, and very fast shipment. I'm planning on using them for some business cards as well.

Frank Petronio
02-05-2012, 13:46
Moo is great, up the contrast a little ~

gb hill
02-05-2012, 15:27
Bob, that is an excellent recommendation!
What you spend on a printer & ink + the price of paper sounds expensive to me Dave. I'm thinking with the cost of printer & ink alone, I can use to pay postage. Especially if your stretched like I am. Ya gotta figure cost of sending em out. But if cost isn't an issue for you, which I think you said it was, then go for it.

Chriscrawfordphoto
02-05-2012, 15:39
Sharpdots.com is great, I use them for a lot of graphic design work I do. I just had a bunch of cards printed for a local artist, and her painting on the card matched my screen damn near perfect. You have to be properly color managed with a CORRECTLY calibrated screen and follow their directions for what CMYK profile to use, but if you're set up right, it works.

ampguy
02-05-2012, 16:36
Of the ~30 I have from the postcard project, the MOO's have the right thickness of a standard postcard, and the image quality is excellent. I don't know what their specs are on the ink, but they should last a long time and shiny deep darks show deep saturation into the paper. They do get rub marks through the mail just like any postcard would, but the print side, and edges hold up well. I don't think anyone found or used a heavier stock than the Moo cards in the project, or better printing, that I can tell.

That said, they are pricey, 80 cents or so each. If someone finds an equivalent, at a lower price, please post.

Frank Petronio
02-05-2012, 17:07
Moo's stock and coating is awesome, nobody will print that heavy without a special run at a local printer. They even do corner rounding for not much money.

I doubt you could find anything more durable to mail that is still paper and to spec.

You could run 14pt at your local litho, a 12 x 18 sheet, 4-color one side, 1 color opposite, get 500 sheets and cut the cards out... figure $1200 to $1800. Do the math.

dave lackey
02-05-2012, 17:08
Moo's stock and coating is awesome, nobody will print that heavy without a special run at a local printer. They even do corner rounding.

I doubt you could find anything more durable to mail that is still paper and to spec.

Corner rounding? That is cool!:cool:

semordnilap
02-05-2012, 17:08
I also used Moo and I was happy. I used 4by6.com in the past and they had a well printed, thick stock card as well, but that was eight or more years ago and I don't know how their quality is now. They do seem to be cheaper than Moo, with more size options as well. I actually completely forgot about them for the RFF project, but I might try in the future to see how they compare.

Brad Bireley
02-05-2012, 17:20
Dave,
I used Vista Print & was very happy. PM your address & I'll mail you one.

jcrutcher
02-05-2012, 18:20
I used Moo also and like them. Good suggestion to up the contrast, I'll do that the next time.

Jim

Chriscrawfordphoto
02-05-2012, 18:52
I used Moo also and like them. Good suggestion to up the contrast, I'll do that the next time.

Jim

If you have to guess on the contrast, the quality is not good. The place I used matched my screen exactly and they only charge $35 for 250 or $44 for 1000 cards. Someone above said Moo charged 80 cents per card, that's outrageously high, especially if the printed cards do not match your screen.

Dave Jenkins
02-05-2012, 19:51
Overnight Prints does a great job and are really cheap if you order the digitally printed cards. Get on their mailing list and take advantage of the deep discounts they offer. I've been using them for several years.

randolph45
02-05-2012, 21:18
Corner rounding? That is cool!:cool:
Done that kind of work and its not fun:(

randolph45
02-05-2012, 23:09
The Moo card stock feels good.Mine are Costco cards,lighter stock,and look to be the same as my print. 69 cents,and laminated. Haven't done postcards before so next time will try Moo:)

dct
02-06-2012, 01:14
To reduce postal fees I tried a local ifolor.com site for the RFF Postcard Project. Color quality is good, but I like the glossy finish and thicker cardboard of moo.com a lot more. On ifolor you have only silky matt finish on the image side. I think, especially for b/w postcards, the gloss finish is very important. I will give it a try.

What I miss especially for dark color subjects or dull b/w images is a white border layout option for the postcard. It is very time consuming with trial and error approach until you have the right frame around your picture, because of the edge cutting with every print process offering.

Does anybody know an online offering including the white border layout?

Damaso
02-06-2012, 04:14
overnightprints.com has good quality and low prices...

dave lackey
02-06-2012, 04:42
overnightprints.com has good quality and low prices...

Thanks, Damaso! I will certainly check them out!:angel:

Lots of good resources here for sure, as one has come to expect from RFF.;)

Damaso
02-06-2012, 04:48
and overnightprints offers rounded corners for an extra dollar or two. I have to say I like the look!

semordnilap
02-06-2012, 08:23
I think that one of the reasons that Moo's prices are higher is that you can choose many different images for the front of the card and still pay the same price. Another reason is that they us 16pt stock, whereas most other companies use a 14pt stock.

But yes, there are definitely may cheaper options–Moo is clearly marketing itself as a premium product, especially with its odd-sized business cards, etc. I looked at sharpdots.com and I like that they will do a hard proof for you–that could very be useful for doing a large offset run if you need really good accuracy. Usually for large runs that I do I don't need any kind of accuracy, and in that case you can get cards for really, really cheap. Actually it looks like sharpdots is quite competitive in offset... that's really good! Thanks for the tip, Chris!