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disco2000
05-01-2011, 06:45
Hi everyone

I am very interested in picking up a GF670, but I've heard that there are some issues with reliability and build quality. Can I get some feedback in regards to that from those who have used/own the camera?
Also, from my understanding, the focus needs to be set to infinity before collapsing the lens, what happens if you forget to do so?

thegman
05-01-2011, 06:50
I would imagine it's a bit soon to comment on reliability, as of course, it's quite new, and it's sturdiness we'll only know over time.

If you forget to set the lens to infinity, it just does not close, it does not break or anything like that.

I've used my brother's GF670 a few times, I think it's one of the best cameras of recent years. 6x7 in such a portable form, with the modern amenities of auto exposure, modern sharp lens and switch-able to 6x6 if you want. Brilliant camera.

Jamie123
05-01-2011, 07:00
The build quality is fine but as it is a folder it's not really a camera to bang around (when it's unfolded).
As thegman says, if the camera isn's set to infinity it will simply not close.

tlitody
05-01-2011, 07:08
Why oh why did fuji ever stop making their medium format cameras, the 6x7, the 6x9, the 6x8. No sooner have they done so and they start making a folder and the soon to be released wide version. Just doesn't seem to make sense since these cameras were the choice of many professionals for weddings and the like. I can only guess that demand has picked up from those coming back from digital or as the older models died and couldn't be repaired.

thegman
05-01-2011, 10:43
I guess they felt there was a better market for a "retro" style 6x7 than a bells/whistle modern 6x7. The wedding pros I'm reading about these days using film tend to market themselves in a certain way, and a bellows camera fits that a lot more than a modern looking camera.

CameraQuest
05-01-2011, 11:36
Hi everyone

I am very interested in picking up a GF670, but I've heard that there are some issues with reliability and build quality. Can I get some feedback in regards to that from those who have used/own the camera?
Also, from my understanding, the focus needs to be set to infinity before collapsing the lens, what happens if you forget to do so?

Warranty repairs on the Voigtlander Bessa III have been minimal. It would seen to be a very reliable camera.

Be careful about low priced grey market Fuji cameras. I doubt Fuji USA will repair grey market imports, and I know I will not repair them.

Stephen

disco2000
05-01-2011, 11:51
Sounds good guys, thanks for the input!


Warranty repairs on the Voigtlander Bessa III have been minimal. It would seen to be a very reliable camera.

Be careful about low priced grey market Fuji cameras. I doubt Fuji USA will repair grey market imports, and I know I will not repair them.

Stephen
I'm mostly likely gonna be buying it used as I will be in Japan later this summer, do you think buying new would be worth it just to get the warranty?

johnny.moped
05-02-2011, 03:39
I also got one.
Unfortunately it focusses way past infinity.
Also the battery-life is pretty poor in cold conditions (about zero degree celius).
Will send it in for calibration the next days. But I was told by Voigtländer that it might take up to two months as it has to be sent to Japan from Germany.

Stephen: Do you know if a misfocussing camera even can be calibrated? I understand that the rangefinder can be calibrated but what if the lens itself just focusses behind infinity?

mgd711
05-02-2011, 03:46
I've used my GF670 for just short off 2 years, there has been close to 200 roll's of Neopan gone through it. It has worked in the tropical heat off the Philippines and the cold of Norther Japan and been banged around in my bag, thrown off and on various helicopters by careless deck crew's and after all that the camera still function's perfectly.

My favourite medium format camera!

Krosya
05-02-2011, 03:51
Warranty repairs on the Voigtlander Bessa III have been minimal. It would seen to be a very reliable camera.

Be careful about low priced grey market Fuji cameras. I doubt Fuji USA will repair grey market imports, and I know I will not repair them.

Stephen

If they are reliable - than why worry about having to repair a grey market Fuji and therefore why bother much more expensive Bessa?
Or they are NOT really that reliable? So, why bother with one at all?
As far as I know Bessa III and Fuji 670 are the SAME thing. Correct?

mgd711
05-02-2011, 04:00
As far as I know Bessa III and Fuji 670 are the SAME thing. Correct?


Correct, but the Fuji was released for the Japanese market only.

thegman
05-02-2011, 04:49
In the UK at least the difference in price between a Bessa III bought through the proper channels, and a imported GF670 can be about £1000. £1000 pays for a lot of repairs, which you'll likely never need. Hell, you can practically buy two GF670s grey market for the price of a "legit" Bessa III in the UK.

I would get the grey import model, if you have any trouble, get it fixed at the most expensive repair man you can find, and you'll still save money.

Having said all that, the Bessa III and the GF670 are the same brilliant camera in different colours.

mugent
05-02-2011, 06:19
Hi everyone

I am very interested in picking up a GF670, but I've heard that there are some issues with reliability and build quality. Can I get some feedback in regards to that from those who have used/own the camera?
Also, from my understanding, the focus needs to be set to infinity before collapsing the lens, what happens if you forget to do so?

I currently own a GF670, I imported it from Canada due to the insane price in the UK.

As others have said, the lens needs to be set to infinity, but it's fine if you don't, it just won't close, I guess you could break it by forcing it, but considering it's a folder, the mechanism feels sturdy.

Another slight issue with the lens is that you cannot close the folder with a filter attached. This is a serious PITA if you shooot Infrared, as you would be constantly putting on/taking off the filter. The lens hood would solve this somewhat as it's a clip-on, and the filters are attached to the hood, not the lens, thus much quicker to remove. But if you are a big fan of filters, this camera will be a pain.

The lens is ever slow slightly soft wide open, but in a nice way, and razor sharp stopped down, which I think makes it very versatile.

Reliability seems fine, I've ran quite a few films through it with no trouble at all. I've also read a few sporadic reports questioning it's reliability, but I've never had any issues with mine.

The build quality is nice, not amazing, but as good as one can reasonably expect, a Hassy will be better built, but it'll also weight twice as much. I think in this case, a lightweight build is better as it makes the camera so much more portable.

I've had it for while, and it's probably the nicest camera I've ever owned.

Cheers

MT

sevo
05-02-2011, 06:26
Correct, but the Fuji was released for the Japanese market only.

As far as I remember, Cosina had a head start of one year on the international market while Fuji was the only Japanese seller for the same period - but since then, both seem to be free from territorial restrictions. Fujifilm positively demonstrated it on international trade shows starting one year after its release and currently offers it for mail order on one of its UK sites.

lshofstra
02-09-2012, 09:29
@johnny moped:
You're right about the battery in cold conditions. It has been it's slightly cold where I live (subzero anyway) and I can't use this camera unless I warm up the (new) battery in my pocket. Then in the camera it's blinking lights and failure because it gets cold again. So in cold circumstances you can't rely on this otherwise great camera to perform, which is a shame, isn't it?

kuzano
02-09-2012, 10:16
Military intelligence
Bad Sex
Country Music

Unreliable Fuji

kuzano
02-09-2012, 10:22
@johnny moped:
You're right about the battery in cold conditions. It has been it's slightly cold where I live (subzero anyway) and I can't use this camera unless I warm up the (new) battery in my pocket. Then in the camera it's blinking lights and failure because it gets cold again. So in cold circumstances you can't rely on this otherwise great camera to perform, which is a shame, isn't it?

Those shooting in cold weather should know that it is common to carry a spare battery in an inner pocket when shooting in near zero or below zero conditions.

Don't try to hang this one on Fuji. It's been true since most cameras became battery dependent in the 60's. Ask any mountain climber or arctic traveler.

Geez, anyone who doesn't like the Fuji GF670 better start finding real Fuji issues to harp about.

NOT Directed at you personally shofstra.

PS: What the H is anybody doing out in sub zero temperatures AND shooting pictures?:eek:

Matus
02-09-2012, 10:35
One question for Stephen:

I never quite understood this "not repairing grey import" thing. I can understand that warranty would not apply for a camera that was imported - fair enough. But why not repair a camera if the owner pays for it? It is business after all .... or did I get it wrong?

DerekF
02-09-2012, 10:57
I never quite understood this "not repairing grey import" thing. I can understand that warranty would not apply for a camera that was imported - fair enough. But why not repair a camera if the owner pays for it? It is business after all .... or did I get it wrong?

Punishment for not getting an authorized version? IIRC Nikon also refuses to repair grey-market imports even if you wanted to pay for it.

Matus
02-09-2012, 11:08
Punishment for not getting an authorized version? IIRC Nikon also refuses to repair grey-market imports even if you wanted to pay for it.

I see, but if you just loose your warranty card or buy second-hand? What then? Or they just check the SN?

Frankly - give the today's globalization, I would really expect world-wide warranty on this kind of products. But then one could not ask 50% for the same product in a different country so easily (not too common, but happens)

canetsbe
02-09-2012, 21:12
since when DID a battery-operated camera work in subzero temperatures? answer: consumer batteries aren't designed to work in those temps so it won't work. use a mechanical camera if you're shooting in the super cold.

Glass Addict
02-09-2012, 21:36
since when DID a battery-operated camera work in subzero temperatures? answer: consumer batteries aren't designed to work in those temps so it won't work. use a mechanical camera if you're shooting in the super cold.
Certain consumer batteries are designed to work in sub-zero temperatures.
It would be absolutely ridiculous for companies to repeat what you just said.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytrsdSR_67Q

Araakii
02-09-2012, 23:50
I don't have a problem with the mechanism but the bottom part is so easy to get scratched. And I am talking about deep scratches, not thin hair marks.

Fotohuis
02-10-2012, 05:43
It has been it's slightly cold where I live (subzero anyway) and I can't use this camera unless I warm up the (new) battery in my pocket. Then in the camera it's blinking lights and failure because it gets cold again.

Interesting: I have shot this week with the camera in the same country in cold circumstances too and no failure of the camera. Not very cold but still around -10 C. Maybe indeed a type/brand of battery problem.

About the filter item: Put a filter 40,5mm in the lens hood and the problem that you can not close the camera with a filter is solved.

canetsbe
02-10-2012, 09:40
Certain consumer batteries are designed to work in sub-zero temperatures.
It would be absolutely ridiculous for companies to repeat what you just said.

lol. you're right, they'd tell you to keep the camera in your coat until you're going to shoot it to keep the battery that won't work in subzero temperatures warm enough to shoot a while before it becomes inoperable.

randomm
02-10-2012, 09:50
lol. you're right, they'd tell you to keep the camera in your coat until you're going to shoot it to keep the battery that won't work in subzero temperatures warm enough to shoot a while before it becomes inoperable.

Yes indeed. And they wouldn't care about you building up moisture inside the camera by repeatedly taking it from warm to cold :)

randomm
02-10-2012, 09:52
PS: What the H is anybody doing out in sub zero temperatures AND shooting pictures?:eek:

If I didn't I could hang up my cameras for couple of months every year :)

Besides, shooting snow is fun!!:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7015/6665946053_b5de32b591_z.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/randomm/6665946053/)
glacial rocks after snow (http://www.flickr.com/photos/randomm/6665946053/) by randomm (http://www.flickr.com/people/randomm/), on Flickr

Fotohuis
02-10-2012, 10:23
Indeed, snow and ice.

Rollei Retro 400S E.I. 200 in the new D74 dev. 1+15 for 5:15 minutes 20C. C.V. Bessa III 667
Split Grade photo print on MGIV 20x25cm/8x10".

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7165/6823649507_309d9b759f_z.jpg