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Roger Hicks
03-06-2011, 04:31
...or other e-book reader? Who is planning on buying one? Who would buy one if there were more books on photography available? The more so as Kindle is apparently well suited to Glorious Living Black-and-White?

Cheers,

R.

RF-Addict
03-06-2011, 04:40
My wife has one - she loves it. We travel a lot and the Kindle has cut down on lugging books around the world:-) She can just download whatever book she wants wherever we happen to be via their wireless link. It weighs close to nothing and really is very easy on the eyes, even in plain sunlight.
I read mostly non-fiction stuff, incl. a lot of photography related books and I prefer real books - I can write in them, add post-it notes, etc.

whitecat
03-06-2011, 04:41
But......if you want full color you should look at the Ipad and the Kindle app.

youngcoby
03-06-2011, 04:45
I have a clone of hanlin. Very happy with it.
Like to read old, royalty-free stuff, mainly Englisch classics, although it's been a while that I have used it. My main hobby is photography now, spending quite some time finding out all kind of new things.

The ereader comes in very handy to put all the manuals of my cameras on it, in case I have to figure out something about them as well

03-06-2011, 04:46
i have the kindle...this is the first version Kindle dx for students. it is kind of sucky for b&w as there are only 16 shades of grey. not too much shadow details, makes the book images look like its been pushed to 3200 iso .... LOL.

sper
03-06-2011, 04:47
I have the Kindle app on my iPad, which would be suitable for photography. The Kindle itself, which my girlfriend has, would be no good for pictures. They would have to be free for me to even try, and then I'd be pretty dissapointed.

I'm a huge kindle supporter for books, I love reading that way. But I'm also happy that photography can (I hope) remain primarily a printed book format. Photography and books go hand in hand, so I'm hoping it gets easier for new photographers to get printed, even when the sale of paperbacks decline.

rover
03-06-2011, 04:58
I have a Kindle, the most recent version. It is a much better media for reading than a paper book. Archival/Library wise, of course a book is far better. Once you read a book it is always there for reference, and as a big cookbook reader and user, there is no comparison. But for reading, the Kindle is so much easier to use. Not having to wear my bifocal glasses is reason enough.

Pickett Wilson
03-06-2011, 05:05
I love my Kindle. It is excellent for reading a book that you would want to read straight through. It is useless for reference books, though. Or books you might want to move back and forth through.

Mcary
03-06-2011, 05:08
Has anyone tried creating a PDF of images in Lightroom or other programs and loading that into their Kindle?
If so how did the images look on the screen?
Thanks Mike

Roger Hicks
03-06-2011, 05:24
I love my Kindle. It is excellent for reading a book that you would want to read straight through. It is useless for reference books, though. Or books you might want to move back and forth through.

Why is that? Would it be addressed if the books were in PDF format? Or are Kindles just too slow?

I've never even seen a Kindle but I'm thinking of buying one. I understand that image quality on the current generation is vastly better than on earlier ones.

Thanks,

R.

Pickett Wilson
03-06-2011, 05:26
It's because there is no very practical way to go to a specific place in a Kindle book. You can change text size as you wish, so there are no fixed pages.

hans voralberg
03-06-2011, 05:29
Ah my friend that has been fixed with the latest 3.1 firmware. The Kindle now have matching page number with printed book. The update might not cover everything book atm but 3/4 of my books now have it.

The Kindle is very useful for quick reference, I have 4 photo books on it. But an Ipad with Kindle App is far more useful for photo books, though heavier.

alistair.o
03-06-2011, 05:35
Ah my friend that has been fixed with the latest 3.1 firmware. The Kindle now have matching page number with printed book. The update might not cover everything book atm but 3/4 of my books now have it.

The Kindle is very useful for quick reference, I have 4 photo books on it. But an Ipad with Kindle App is far more useful for photo books, though heavier.

I too am toying with the idea of buying a Kindle so, did you mean that you can now bookmark a specific page and place or is this still an issue as Picket Wilson mentioned?

Thanks

Roger Hicks
03-06-2011, 05:37
It's because there is no very practical way to go to a specific place in a Kindle book. You can change text size as you wish, so there are no fixed pages.

Thanks very much indeed -- and thanks also to everyone else who has replied so far. Do you think the 3.1 software (see above) would address this adequately?

I completely agree with those who like 'real' (printed) books, but (for example) a Kindle guide-book might be usable if it had pages or was searcheable.

Cheers,

R.

dan_sutton
03-06-2011, 05:39
Ah my friend that has been fixed with the latest 3.1 firmware. The Kindle now have matching page number with printed book. The update might not cover everything book atm but 3/4 of my books now have it.

The Kindle is very useful for quick reference, I have 4 photo books on it. But an Ipad with Kindle App is far more useful for photo books, though heavier.

Mind if I ask which photo books?

rover
03-06-2011, 05:42
I too am toying with the idea of buying a Kindle so, did you mean that you can now bookmark a specific page and place or is this still an issue as Picket Wilson mentioned?

Thanks

You can bookmark any point in a book with a Kindle as you read. You can also mark any specific passage and make notes related to it for yourself or to be shared. The issue PW is talking about is that you cannot easily read a page number in a table of contents and then go to that page, as you can in a book. I am not sure if how the recent update deals with this.

Pickett Wilson
03-06-2011, 05:45
I'm not sure how you would deal with it. If the original page uses 10 pt type, and I increase my type size to 32 points, page numbers become meaningless. Like I say, it's great for novels and non-fiction books that you would mostly read straight through.

alistair.o
03-06-2011, 05:47
You can bookmark any point in a book with a Kindle as you read. You can also mark any specific passage and make notes related to it for yourself or to be shared. The issue PW is talking about is that you cannot easily read a page number in a table of contents and then go to that page, as you can in a book. I am not sure if how the recent update deals with this.

Thanks Rover. I clearly did not read what was written! I may give a Kindle a try. At the moment (for my needs)I cannot see the absolute need for going to a specific page number.

mabelsound
03-06-2011, 05:54
I have a Kindle 3...I find it adequate for reading. It does not match a paper book in any way, aesthetically speaking, but it does the job, and is extremely compact. When the iPad with retina display comes out, I'll probably use that more, but for now I really prefer the Kindle for casual reading.

I just bought Neal Stephenson's "Anathem" on it. The Kindle is perfect for things like this--I intend to read the book on a trip next month, and without the kindle it would take up half my travel bag!

It's no good for photos, but the iPad is excellent for photo books.

mabelsound
03-06-2011, 06:02
BTW, self-promotion alert, but my last two books are now available in Kindle editions. And the annoying this is, when I asked my publisher for copies, they couldn't give them.

Also, try getting an author's autograph on one of these things!

RayPA
03-06-2011, 06:05
I have the latest Kindle. I got it last year. It's great. For reading, I prefer it over an LCD-type display. It's much easier on the eyes and is EXCELLENT for reading in daylight. I disagree somewhat with the comment that it is not good for jumping around. While books on Kindle have a much more linear feel, I've found that once you get used to the functions, searching and finding stuff is about the same (you can add bookmarks, search, select and save text). Although, there is no e-book equivalent for browsing or flipping through a book.

The reader is not really good for books with tables and graphs, and pictures can be iffy. I hope they improve that with future revisions, because I'm primarily a nonfiction reader. It's really best for pure text books, so fiction is probably best.


/

robklurfield
03-06-2011, 06:07
I gave my wife a Kindle. She loves it. Fortunately for me, she's overwhelmed with reading from grad school just now, so I've been "borrowing" it. Pink cover and all. I love it. Funny, because before I gave it to her I was afraid it would be the death knell of books. It's not. It's simply a really handy additional tool for reading. Anyway, I'm currently reading Saul Bellow's Herzog. Perhaps when I'm done, I'll have to download Robert Lennon's latest novel (mabelsound, I've forgotten whether your nom de plume is Robert or John).

ampguy
03-06-2011, 07:51
Kindle 3. I couldn't imagining buying using it to look at photos, but for reading it's great. I'm waiting for the 3rd Stieg Larsson book to go on sale. Son has the Sony reader. The advantage of that is he can checkout library books with drm.

mabelsound
03-06-2011, 07:56
I gave my wife a Kindle. She loves it. Fortunately for me, she's overwhelmed with reading from grad school just now, so I've been "borrowing" it. Pink cover and all. I love it. Funny, because before I gave it to her I was afraid it would be the death knell of books. It's not. It's simply a really handy additional tool for reading. Anyway, I'm currently reading Saul Bellow's Herzog. Perhaps when I'm done, I'll have to download Robert Lennon's latest novel (mabelsound, I've forgotten whether your nom de plume is Robert or John).

It's J. Robert Lennon! But I go by John personally. (You can see why I choose the initial initial.)

Thanks for considering my novel! Would love to hear what you thought, if you read it.

One other thing about the Kindle...it works, but it is so obsolete-tech. It just doesn't feel sorted yet. I'm with John Gruber, who said that it seems like it was something designed in 1985 and only just now manufactured. It's super cheap to buy though and it looks like it will eventually be free, if Bezos's broad hinting is to be believed.

I want greater screen contrast and better book design, personally. but those will come.

SciAggie
03-06-2011, 08:20
If you are looking for a device dedicated to reading, then the Kindle is the best by far. I have an Ipad and it works well for reading - it is just heavier and has some screen glare issues. One thing that is nice about the Ipad is that I have photos and other Apps along with the e-reader.

yoyo22
03-06-2011, 09:05
(...) The more so as Kindle is apparently well suited to Glorious Living Black-and-White? (...)

Perhaps the following pics can answer that question. I've just picked two random scans from my hdd, created a kindle ebook and took some quick snaps of it. I'll include the resized originals as well.


original version:
http://www.crazykitten.net/pics/airport.jpg

on the kindle:
http://www.crazykitten.net/pics/airport_kindle.jpg

original version:
http://www.crazykitten.net/pics/phils.jpg

on the kindle:
http://www.crazykitten.net/pics/phils_kindle.jpg

I hope that gives you an impression of the rendering qualities of the kindle. Actually I find it not too bad.

JOE1951
03-06-2011, 09:16
I've thought about Kindles and iPads, etc. Not sure if I would ever use one. I do have a fetish for paper books and the printed word in general. I also tend to mark my books up!!! How practical is this with readers?

An extreme example, I just finished reading "Infinite Jest" by David Foster Wallace, for the second time, and I couldn't imagine readng this, or alot of other authors I like (Vollmann, Bolano, etc.) electronically.

That being said, altough others have said different, I think these readers could be a revolution for text books, magazines and such.

mabelsound's comment about autographs rings true for me also!

Bingley
03-06-2011, 09:35
My wife loves her Kindle, especially since it's lighter to carry on travel than books. If your primary interest is an e-reader, the Kindle is a good deal, IMO. Nice sharp screen.

I use the Kindle app on my iPad, and I think it's great. I've downloaded guidebooks for vacation planning, and can use the links in the text to go directly to hotel or other travel-related websites. And the iPad Kindle app works fine for reading, too. I've also downloaded some free books from Stanza, and that works fine too.

Pickett Wilson
03-06-2011, 09:35
Well, I think something more like the Ipad is the future of textbooks. As much as I like my Kindle, it's a pretty single purpose device.

JoeV
03-06-2011, 09:42
Has anyone tried creating a PDF of images in Lightroom or other programs and loading that into their Kindle?
If so how did the images look on the screen?
Thanks Mike

I just did this last week, not to photographic images but to both a short story and an unfinished work of mine that's now the length of a novelette (20k words, so far).

The original texts were in ".txt" format, because they were written on my AlphaSmart Neo (which is the subject of an entirely different thread -- a great writing-only tool, one of the best keyboards found anywhere, and a two-year battery life on three AA-cells, available from Renaissance Learning's online store for around $160us).

I imported the ".txt" files into Open Office Writer (but Word or any other full-featured WP would work), then resized the pages to fit the size of the Kindle. I have the latest WiFi-only version of the Kindle ($139US in the colonies), so I simply measured the screen size of the Kindle, used that for the page size in Open Office Writer, then formatted the border size to 0.1". I then exported the file as a PDF (file/export/pdf) and saved it as a PDF file. Make sure, after resizing the document's page size for the Kindle but before exporting as a PDF, to apply whatever margin justification that you want. I like it justified on both right and left margins. After export to PDF, the original WP file I simply reverted back to full-sized pages. Thus, the page resizing was a temporary means to achieve a PDF of the right page size.

Then you attach the Kindle to your computer via the supplied USB cable; the Kindle will show up as a flash drive in your computer's file structure. Open the Kindle folder and drag your newly created PDF files into the Kindle's "Documents" folder. That's all there is to it. Once you disconnect the Kindle and go to the Home screen you'll see your new document in the list of books, and can be opened and read like any other Kindle Store e-book.

The quality looks every bit as good as the Kindle Store's paid files, although I'm not sure of the style of font used in the Kindle (I think it's listed in the master owner's manual document), you should be able to get close to matching the font style in Word or Open Office Writer.

Regarding the quality of B/W images on the Kindle, I am impressed with the pre-loaded images the Kindle applies to the screen when you power it off; they are like half-tone newspaper images but of a much higher resolution. Gray scale is adequate, and the fine grain of the eInk display gives it an interesting texture. Of course, the brighter the viewing light the better, as is the case with all Kindle-like displays, which is one of their chief advantages over backlit displays.

Based on my impression of the graphic images I've seen on the Kindle, I'm curious about exploring the creation of PDF files with B/W images sized and formatted specifically for the Kindle, as a Kindle-specific B/W photography book. This shouldn't be too hard to do. You can import JPEGs into modern word processor programs, then resize the pages and export as a PDF. You can also use programs like Power Point or Open Office Simpress to create pages with JPEG images, then export as PDF documents.

BTW, you can surf the Internet on the Kindle, although the pages are monochrome and nonanimated. But the quality is more than adequate for simply reading text and viewing B/W images.

~Joe

NickTrop
03-06-2011, 09:44
I have a Kindle, the most recent version. It is a much better media for reading than a paper book. Archival/Library wise, of course a book is far better.

+1 I have an older DX that I got as a gift a year or so ago - I absolutely, positively friggin' love the thing. Paper books? thing "for the most part" of the past. - I look at the boxes of old books I have lying around in boxes... Uggh! Why wasn't this invented sooner?

That all said, I really don't think that this would be a good tool for photography books at all. When I say "photography books" I assume the OP is talking about "picture books" with photos by (insert photographer of note here...), rather than books about photography.

Nah, pictures are only "so-so" on the Kindle. Electronic ink (not a gimick) is about text, not pics. This may not be true of color versions (mine is black and white...) but I have no interest in those - needlessly more expensive (I guess if you do a lot of magazines) and it shortens the amazing battery life on these things.

Kindles! (or your ebook reader of choice...) Great. Get one. But if you want a photography book, still buy a good one on high quality print/paper. For that, paper will be king for as far as the eye can see...

SciAggie
03-06-2011, 10:00
Well, I think something more like the Ipad is the future of textbooks. As much as I like my Kindle, it's a pretty single purpose device.

I teach in a public school that is has a 1 to 1 student/ laptop ratio. Every student in the 4th through 12th grade has a laptop that they use in school and take home at the end of the day. My classroom has an interactive whiteboard and document camera. I have both digital cameras and video available to the students. We have numerous online paid resources. My point is that we are deeply immersed in technology.

I have a classroom set of textbooks but they are rarely used. They are valuable as one of many choices in resources. I have the luxury of choosing among many available resources for the one that is the most effective for teaching a particular concept.

In this environment I have found the laptop to be a great choice if an individual must produce electronic products (written work, presentations, etc). If the person is consuming more than producing (90/10), then something like the Ipad is great. This is the way I access this forum over 90% of the time. Ipads are great if other apps have an appeal to you.

For the pure purpose of reading for pleasure, the Kindle is king. Given all of the technology available to my students, 100% of the ones that read for pleasure use a dedicated e-reader such as the Kindle.

I hope this perspective is helpful to you in making your choice.

_larky
03-06-2011, 10:00
I have an iPad. I would like more photographic books, it has the perfect screen for them.

RayPA
03-06-2011, 10:07
I hope that gives you an impression of the rendering qualities of the kindle. Actually I find it not too bad.

Not bad at all! I've been wanting to try this. I was going to try it with a PDF.






/

bwcolor
03-06-2011, 10:12
The reader and tablet will obviously merge. Single use devices like the Kindle will either become extinct or really cheap. Amazon seems to be moving towards the really cheap and charging more for content. Where have we seen that business model before..ahh..cellphone, printers..etc. The iPads and other tablets are also very limited in that they are slow and lower resolution than laptops. They also are not as easy on the eye as a Kindle. All these technologies will converge. Fast, readable, color tablets that roll or fold will solve the Beta/VHS .. type competition. For now, I'm just waiting.

coelacanth
03-06-2011, 10:14
I have both Kindle (3rd gen) and iPad. Kindle is a lot better reading device, but I wouldn't buy photography books for it. That said, because I want to carry and read two books switching back and forth, Kindle makes my life easier. The SF Chronicle for Kindle got a lot better over time as well.

whitecat
03-06-2011, 10:23
With the Ipad you can get the Zenio app and download your monthly photo magazines like shutterbug. Amazing screen and color.

NickTrop
03-06-2011, 10:28
The reader and tablet will obviously merge. Single use devices like the Kindle will either become extinct or really cheap.

I disagree completely. Different screen technologies for each. Kindles use electronic ink, which made for text. Also, the battery life on these things is amazing... a week or two per charge for the black and white one? The newer ones last - like, a month, and they charge pretty quickly. I have a PC, a notebook, and Kindle. I view a tablet as one of those "do all" scanner machines... Kindle sales are up. It's designed to do one thing - read books, and it does it very, very well. I don't see any Tablet taking over for this function. If I owned a tablet, I might still get a Kindle for reading.

mabelsound
03-06-2011, 10:34
I'm with Nick. I thought the iPad was going to kill the Kindle, but it isn't turning out that way--e-ink will get cheaper and better, I think, and readers will be a very fine single-use tech.

I like that I can't check email on the Kindle. Not without enormous effort anyway. It's as like a book as an electronic device can get.

Stravinsky
03-06-2011, 10:49
I love my Kindle, it opened new possibilities in my reading. For reading it's the best electronic tool. I need glasses when using a computer but the Kindle is like a book. And the battery is neverending if you switch off the WiFi/3G (ok, not as a real book, I admit).
Go for it, the price is inviting too.

swoop
03-06-2011, 10:56
The kindle is awesome. I use it to read books pure and simple. But I'm also interested in an ipad for magazine subscriptions. I think each has a purpose and despite other devices being able to use kindle ebooks. The kindle itself does an amazing job at replacing the standard book.

leica M2 fan
03-06-2011, 11:19
Sug, so good to see you're back! I asked about you about a month ago and no one had heard at all from you. Welcome back and this time, dude - stay. You were missed.

ampguy
03-06-2011, 11:46
How does your process below differ from the results if you just sent your .txt or .doc to the free.kindle.com rendering service?

Agree with the others, the things that make the ipad look good and do all that cool stuff is what makes it a lesser dedicated reading device.

They may merge someday in the future, but they'll need different screen and operating modes.

The kindle runs for 30 days with wireless off, or 10 days with wireless on. The ipad runs 10 hours at best.

btw, you can get email, read rff, etc. with the primitive experimental browser on the kindle. Also, the 3G is free. Try getting free 3G with an ipad.


I just did this last week, not to photographic images but to both a short story and an unfinished work of mine that's now the length of a novelette (20k words, so far).

The original texts were in ".txt" format, because they were written on my AlphaSmart Neo (which is the subject of an entirely different thread -- a great writing-only tool, one of the best keyboards found anywhere, and a two-year battery life on three AA-cells, available from Renaissance Learning's online store for around $160us).

I imported the ".txt" files into Open Office Writer (but Word or any other full-featured WP would work), then resized the pages to fit the size of the Kindle. I have the latest WiFi-only version of the Kindle ($139US in the colonies), so I simply measured the screen size of the Kindle, used that for the page size in Open Office Writer, then formatted the border size to 0.1". I then exported the file as a PDF (file/export/pdf) and saved it as a PDF file. Make sure, after resizing the document's page size for the Kindle but before exporting as a PDF, to apply whatever margin justification that you want. I like it justified on both right and left margins. After export to PDF, the original WP file I simply reverted back to full-sized pages. Thus, the page resizing was a temporary means to achieve a PDF of the right page size.

Then you attach the Kindle to your computer via the supplied USB cable; the Kindle will show up as a flash drive in your computer's file structure. Open the Kindle folder and drag your newly created PDF files into the Kindle's "Documents" folder. That's all there is to it. Once you disconnect the Kindle and go to the Home screen you'll see your new document in the list of books, and can be opened and read like any other Kindle Store e-book.

The quality looks every bit as good as the Kindle Store's paid files, although I'm not sure of the style of font used in the Kindle (I think it's listed in the master owner's manual document), you should be able to get close to matching the font style in Word or Open Office Writer.

Regarding the quality of B/W images on the Kindle, I am impressed with the pre-loaded images the Kindle applies to the screen when you power it off; they are like half-tone newspaper images but of a much higher resolution. Gray scale is adequate, and the fine grain of the eInk display gives it an interesting texture. Of course, the brighter the viewing light the better, as is the case with all Kindle-like displays, which is one of their chief advantages over backlit displays.

Based on my impression of the graphic images I've seen on the Kindle, I'm curious about exploring the creation of PDF files with B/W images sized and formatted specifically for the Kindle, as a Kindle-specific B/W photography book. This shouldn't be too hard to do. You can import JPEGs into modern word processor programs, then resize the pages and export as a PDF. You can also use programs like Power Point or Open Office Simpress to create pages with JPEG images, then export as PDF documents.

BTW, you can surf the Internet on the Kindle, although the pages are monochrome and nonanimated. But the quality is more than adequate for simply reading text and viewing B/W images.

~Joe

skibeerr
03-06-2011, 12:40
hey Roger,

thanks a new world opens! And this fits in our Bohemian emigrating plans. It's this or schlepping our books around half the globe.

w

Roger Hicks
03-06-2011, 12:56
+1 I have an older DX that I got as a gift a year or so ago - I absolutely, positively friggin' love the thing. Paper books? thing "for the most part" of the past. - I look at the boxes of old books I have lying around in boxes... Uggh! Why wasn't this invented sooner?

That all said, I really don't think that this would be a good tool for photography books at all. When I say "photography books" I assume the OP is talking about "picture books" with photos by (insert photographer of note here...), rather than books about photography.

Nah, pictures are only "so-so" on the Kindle. Electronic ink (not a gimick) is about text, not pics. This may not be true of color versions (mine is black and white...) but I have no interest in those - needlessly more expensive (I guess if you do a lot of magazines) and it shortens the amazing battery life on these things.

Kindles! (or your ebook reader of choice...) Great. Get one. But if you want a photography book, still buy a good one on high quality print/paper. For that, paper will be king for as far as the eye can see...
Dear Nick,

No, I did mean about photography. Looking at good-quality pics on a half-decent computer screen is bad enough. On a Kindle it has to be worse. I completely agree that paper will be king for as far as the eye can see.

Cheers,

R.

Roger Hicks
03-06-2011, 12:59
Perhaps the following pics can answer that question. I've just picked two random scans from my hdd, created a kindle ebook and took some quick snaps of it. I'll include the resized originals as well.

I hope that gives you an impression of the rendering qualities of the kindle. Actually I find it not too bad.

Yes, indeed, and thanks very much.

Cheers,

R.

graywolf
03-06-2011, 14:29
I sometimes wonder about progress, I used to read on my Toshiba PDA with the VGA color screen. The screen died and I have not replaced it with anything, but I believe it showed photos better than the samples I saw above. Also, I could buy quite a few books for the price of a Kindle. But, I feel the same way about subscribed to cel-phones, my Trekphone only costs me about $7/mo, hard to go back to that $50/mo stuff. Now if I could just find a cheap substitute for gasoline.

charjohncarter
03-06-2011, 18:42
I got the Ipad, I don't know why. But I'm still trying to figure out a use for it. My wife does play bridge with an ak that I bought her. Maybe someday I'll understand what the fuss is about.

Edit: I will say; my photos look better on the Ipad.

leica M2 fan
03-06-2011, 18:54
After reading all of this I've gotten very interested in the I-pad 2 with the ebook application. Mostly though I would use it for photo viewing.

victoriapio
03-06-2011, 19:13
Gave my wife a Nook for Christmas and its fabulous for two things - reading and integrating with public library data bases for FREE e-books, even new releases. My wife is a library person, reads at least two books per week but NEVER, and I mean NEVER, buys a book. So I talked with a local librarian here and she recommended the Nook for their downloadable e-books - all you need is a library card and it is free. I checked out two non-fiction books and love the thing too. Also it has a great chess and soduku games when you finish a book.
I doubt the Nook screen would be very good for photos and the keyboard is absolutely klunky and hard to use but the reading is as good as it gets.

kkdanamatt
03-06-2011, 19:56
The images and print on the Color Nook look better than they do on the Kindle, at least to my eyes. YMMV.

coelacanth
03-06-2011, 20:04
Tony,

Oh thank you very much for your kind words. I didn't know. I had a bit of rough time and whatnot, but I'm slowly getting back to photography and RFF. :)

I like the color photos on iPad, traditional b/w on printed paper (ideally actual prints) and reading on Kindle.

JHenry
03-06-2011, 20:31
I was an earlier adopter of readers. Bought the first Sony Reader when it came out in late 2006, then switched to the Kindle 2--very useful to have if you live in a country where they censor books.

When I got the iPad and downloaded the Kindle app, I stopped using the Kindle. I think reading on the Kindle iPad app is better than reading on the Kindle itself (Kindle 2, that is)--unless you are outside on a bright day.

Add in the Zinio app, with interactive National Geographic subscription, plus a few of the photography magazines, and all is well (and lightweight) with the world when I travel. And, just last week used it for the first time to backup photos using the SD card adapter while traveling.

Now, if only Black and White Photography (the British magazine) would come out with an electronic version. I'm tired of paying NZD 27.00 for the air-freighted in version each month.

Rayt
03-06-2011, 21:11
I am reading a New York Times book review and in minutes I have it on the Kindle. If I don't want to carry the Kindle on the bus I can read it on the Iphone app. I can make the text giant size so no more reading glasses. If I want to reread some old classic it is only around two bucks. And I don't live in the US so getting books locally or getting them shipped from Amazon cost a lot more.

pobe
03-06-2011, 21:42
I've been thinking about getting one. Some people say I should get an iPad instead, but I really just want it for reading books so I think the Kindle will be better for me. I love reading and usually bring a lot of books on vacation, only to finish them all way before it's time to go back home... An e-reader makes perfect sense for me, the only reason I haven't gotten one earlier is that they seemed a bit pricey, but that sure have changed!

hans voralberg
03-06-2011, 22:29
Mind if I ask which photo books?

My latest addtion is "Light, Shadow and Skin Tone: The Complete Guide to Shooting Black and White". Technically not a photo books but it has photo every 3-4 pages, so still a lot!

cidereye
03-06-2011, 23:04
As an avid reader of "real" books I was very unsure about book readers but can honestly say purchasing a Kindle has been easily my best buy in many years.

I just love it, especially as it fits so well into my small photo bag so well and weighs nothing and fits perfectly into my new ethos that everything I carry around with me *must* be small and light.

I'm reading Keith Richards autobiography at present and the thought of carrying the equivalent large & heavy hardback book around as in the old day's puts a nice smile on my face and I never forget what a wise investment the Kindle has been for me. :)

OurManInTangier
03-07-2011, 02:49
Without wishing to hijack the thread I have a few questions regarding the Kindle that you may be able to answer.

My 90 year old grandmother fell in her back garden and broke her hip last week. She's now in hospital for a long spell and in need of stimulus. She's unable to read the small text of books at the moment as she has just had a cataract op and her glasses no longer suit her corrected vision. As such I've wondered whether a Kindle may offer a better option for her as I'm assuming you can adjust the font size and or zoom in?

Would you, as a kindle user, think that this would be suitable for her?

As an aside and a comment on this astonishing woman; she broke her hip, which caused a heart attack but managed to drag herself up the length of her garden, up some stone steps through her kitchen and into the hall where she phoned an ambulance. She suffered two subsequent heart attacks and was given a few hours to live. With her family by her bedside she came round, somewhat confused thinking we were all at her house, and started to issue orders as to where we should all sleep, where the necessary bedding was and what she had that we could eat. 24 hours later she was off the critical list, off the morphine and making plans for her recovery. Not once have I heard her complain or moan about her situation and the inevitable huge change in her life that this will cause. Had this happened to me I very much doubt that I could have dealt with it so stoically. So, as you can see a loving grandson should do all that he can to alleviate her boredom and frustrations whilst in hospital, hence the idea of a kindle. Any suggestions would be very much appreciated.

Many thanks

Bike Tourist
03-07-2011, 06:54
The Kindle has transformed me from a sometime reader into an inveterate one. I have had it for over a year now. I enjoy the free classics. I enjoy the new releases priced between $9.99 and $14.99. I enjoy the old standards priced less than that. I don't worry about the local library hours. I can take it everywhere. The battery lasts and lasts with 3G turned off.

It is easy to synchronize my Kindle with my iPhone or computer, but I seldom need to do that. Since I have wifi available at home I would buy the wifi-only version if I were to purchase one again.

Ken Smith
03-07-2011, 07:13
Something about the heft, the feel of paper on the finger tip, and the simple act of turning a page has kept me in the printed world. The fact that I can look at the bookshelf and see old friends, pull them down, feel their substance in my hands. Well - it just satisfies. Besides - an e-book store will never have that rich smell associated with the printed word.

andersju
03-07-2011, 09:46
After seeing my sister's Kindle I knew I had to get one too. Due to logistics I couldn't get the Kindle before I left for a long journey so I got a Sony PRS-350 instead (would have preferred the larger PRS-650 but it wasn't in stock). It's a great little device. Graphics-heavy PDFs are a pain with the slow rendering but it's wonderful for plain text. It has done wonders for my reading.

Different readers support different formats, which can be problematic (e.g., many ebooks are in epub format, which the Kindle doesn't support), but there's a great free program called Calibre (http://calibre-ebook.com/) with which you can convert between a whole bunch of formats.

coelacanth
03-07-2011, 10:07
Beauty of Kindle (especially the latest gen) is its light weight, size and low price tag. With iPad, I have to actually "think" about bringing it because of its size, weight (don't want to read hours on it) and replacement cost in case of loss/accident, but with Kindle, I just throw it in the back pocket of my notebook (Leuchtturm1917) and forget about it.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_kWxeki68O7I/TXUrXdMVQKI/AAAAAAAABZQ/YaEP2qrXJlo/s640/11%2011%3A00%3A43%20AM.jpg

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_kWxeki68O7I/TXUrUOVGl8I/AAAAAAAABZM/sI3smq9vv58/s640/11%2011%3A00%3A30%20AM.jpg

RayPA
03-07-2011, 10:10
Without wishing to hijack the thread I have a few questions regarding the Kindle that you may be able to answer.

My 90 year old grandmother fell in her back garden and broke her hip last week. She's now in hospital for a long spell and in need of stimulus. She's unable to read the small text of books at the moment as she has just had a cataract op and her glasses no longer suit her corrected vision. As such I've wondered whether a Kindle may offer a better option for her as I'm assuming you can adjust the font size and or zoom in?

Yes the font size is adjustable and can be made very large. Also there is a 'speak menu' option.

Would you, as a kindle user, think that this would be suitable for her?

For eyesight and size and weight, yes.

I have the black model and the text contrast on the buttons can be hard to read (maybe get her a white one?). The text and navigation buttons are a little on the small side and require a little dexterity to operate. If she knows Qwerty and uses a computer or a cell phone then she should be OK with the buttons and the concepts behind the usage (home, back, menu).




/

andreios
03-07-2011, 10:27
I'm sorry if it was discussed before, I didn't search this thread, but is there anyone using the Kindle in "Rest of World" as Amazon puts it, i.e. someplace else than USA or UK? Is it possible to purchase all e-stuff from amazon or are there any restrictions?
Thanks!

OurManInTangier
03-07-2011, 14:51
Yes the font size is adjustable and can be made very large. Also there is a 'speak menu' option.



For eyesight and size and weight, yes.

I have the black model and the text contrast on the buttons can be hard to read (maybe get her a white one?). The text and navigation buttons are a little on the small side and require a little dexterity to operate. If she knows Qwerty and uses a computer or a cell phone then she should be OK with the buttons and the concepts behind the usage (home, back, menu)./

Ray that's really helpful info thank you so much. She should be fine with the Qwerty keyboard and the 'speak' option sounds really useful too - another option I had thought about were spoken word books but I thought she would struggle more with an Ipod than a kindle.

BillBingham2
03-07-2011, 15:52
Simon,

Get her the most recent kindle. Might set her up with the cell-phone (2G?) option and set up an account for with some cash. It turned my son into an avid reader for a while. I would get one but I'm saving up for the iPad 3 (if I can wait that long....).

Roger,

+1 on the love the Kindle approach. I used the app on my Android phone to read my last text book for school. I have it on my Mac and love the ability to move between platforms with ease.

B2

GSNfan
03-07-2011, 15:56
Electronic Ink (E Ink) which is used for display in Kindle could be the reason B&W look really good in it? I have not used a kindle but i was reading about its E Ink technology. E Ink appears very promising for display of images.

charjohncarter
03-07-2011, 17:52
Has anybody tried the $35 model from India? But I still would like to know; is there a use for this device (none of the books I want to read are on the schedule)? The only thing I've done with it in 4 months is watch 'Rockford Files' when I'm going to sleep.

EDIT: I have the Ipad.

ampguy
03-07-2011, 18:00
I mainly read the free books. But I highly recommend the Stieg Larsson trilogy, and then watching the movies (free for Amazon Prime users).

Of course the books have much more detail. The first one I picked up at Costco in paperback for $5, and then I got the 2nd one in kindle ed. for $5, but saw the 3rd one was still about $10 (it's not in paperback yet). However, they fluctuate, and of course the kindle editions go down when the paperbacks come out, so I can wait.

I also read the free chapter of John (Mabelsound's) book, and it was pretty good reading. Highly recommend it.

Of the ~200 books on my Kindle, about 190 are free ones from Amazon. They list out the best selling top 100+ updated every day. Often you'll see a free one go to the for sale list as it gains momentum from being given out free, then goes back to normal price.

Of course, once I clear off the "romance novels" which I am not interested in, I will probably be down to 50 books. Having the classics like Crime and Punishment are great, free, and searchable, and audio capable.


Has anybody tried the $35 model from India? But I still would like to know; is there a use for this device (none of the books I want to read are on the schedule)? The only thing I've done with it in 4 months is watch 'Rockford Files' when I'm going to sleep.

EDIT: I have the Ipad.

mabelsound
03-08-2011, 03:49
I also read the free chapter of John (Mabelsound's) book, and it was pretty good reading. Highly recommend it.

Thanks, Ted!

mabelsound
03-08-2011, 03:50
Electronic Ink (E Ink) which is used for display in Kindle could be the reason B&W look really good in it? I have not used a kindle but i was reading about its E Ink technology. E Ink appears very promising for display of images.

Contrast is terrible, compared to paper or a computer screen. But it will improve with time, I think. The Kindle 3 has much better contrast than the Kindle 2.

Rayt
03-08-2011, 03:55
I'm sorry if it was discussed before, I didn't search this thread, but is there anyone using the Kindle in "Rest of World" as Amazon puts it, i.e. someplace else than USA or UK? Is it possible to purchase all e-stuff from amazon or are there any restrictions?
Thanks!

I am in Hong Kong and so far have been able to download what I wanted from the Amazon US cite with no problems.

mangie
03-08-2011, 04:20
Tried a Kindle belonging to a fellow passenger on a long trip to Australia and was hooked, so my children bought me one for Christmas.It is excellent for popping in a bag instead of a pile of heavy books. To me it is to books what digital is to film.
It would be good to have one to download Picasa so that I could travel across the world with all my photos .
However, nothing beats my books and nothing beats my photographs.

mangie

Roger Hicks
03-08-2011, 04:47
Well, I'd buy a Kindle today if I could -- but I can't. I can pay for one, in dollars, with a very long delivery time and the likelihood of having to pay customs and handling fees. None of the UK stores seems willing to ship to France, despite the enormous advantages of easy shipping and no extra taxes. Does anyone know of a store in the UK that would ship to me? Note that in France they use the AZERTY keyboard, so even if I could get a French Kindle, it would drive me crazy.

As usual with Amazon, there's a nasty taste in the mouth from trying to deal with a company that wants to be a monopoly; will use every means it can to be a monopoly (including proprietary formats); and either fails to understand, or disregards, the fact that within the EU there is supposed to be free movement of goods and services.

Cheers,

R.

hans voralberg
03-08-2011, 05:07
I'm sorry if it was discussed before, I didn't search this thread, but is there anyone using the Kindle in "Rest of World" as Amazon puts it, i.e. someplace else than USA or UK? Is it possible to purchase all e-stuff from amazon or are there any restrictions?
Thanks!

I'm in Vietnam and been buying books from Amazon, no problem except for some books not available outside US. This place is as remote as you can get technologically so any other civilized place shouldn't cause any problem.

GSNfan
03-08-2011, 05:11
I'm really getting the GAS for Kindle. Not for photos, but simply for reading.

Those looking for free e-books, check out Project Gutenberg!

feenej
03-08-2011, 05:16
I'm typing this, and I'm on rff on my daughter Kindle. Free 3g web browsing.

cidereye
03-08-2011, 05:19
Well, I'd buy a Kindle today if I could -- but I can't. I can pay for one, in dollars, with a very long delivery time and the likelihood of having to pay customs and handling fees. None of the UK stores seems willing to ship to France, despite the enormous advantages of easy shipping and no extra taxes. Does anyone know of a store in the UK that would ship to me? Note that in France they use the AZERTY keyboard, so even if I could get a French Kindle, it would drive me crazy.

As usual with Amazon, there's a nasty taste in the mouth from trying to deal with a company that wants to be a monopoly; will use every means it can to be a monopoly (including proprietary formats); and either fails to understand, or disregards, the fact that within the EU there is supposed to be free movement of goods and services.

Cheers,

R.
@ Roger

Have you tried either of these for French shipping a Kindle?

http://www.johnlewis.com/Electricals/Kindle+and+eReaders/Kindle+and+eReaders/Kindle/18377/ProductCategory.aspx

http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/amazon-kindle-wireless-reading-device-wi-fi-only-available-through-reserve-collect-08665555-pdt.html

Worth a look I guess.

Charles

Roger Hicks
03-08-2011, 05:30
@ Roger

Have you tried either of these for French shipping a Kindle?

http://www.johnlewis.com/Electricals/Kindle+and+eReaders/Kindle+and+eReaders/Kindle/18377/ProductCategory.aspx

http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/amazon-kindle-wireless-reading-device-wi-fi-only-available-through-reserve-collect-08665555-pdt.html

Worth a look I guess.

Charles

Dear Charles,

Unfortunately, I've already tried both. Currys won't ship to France and John Lewis doesn't sell it on line. Thanks kindly for the thought, though.

Cheers,

R.

GSNfan
03-08-2011, 05:39
Dear Charles,

Unfortunately, I've already tried both. Currys won't ship to France and John Lewis doesn't sell it on line. Thanks kindly for the thought, though.

Cheers,

R.

Buy it from from E-bay, i just checked and there are many, all brand new.

Roger Hicks
03-08-2011, 05:44
Buy it from from E-bay, i just checked and there are many, all brand new.

Thanks, but having tried to follow up your suggestion, I can't seem to strain out all the American sales. No doubt this stems from my never having bought anything from eBay in my life, and I hesitate to impose upon you further, but if you can spare the time, I'd be grateful if you could point me at an British seller who will ship to France.

Cheers,

R.

GSNfan
03-08-2011, 05:52
Thanks, but having tried to follow up your suggestion, I can't seem to strain out all the American sales. No doubt this stems from my never having bought anything from eBay in my life, and I hesitate to impose upon you further, but if you can spare the time, I'd be grateful if you could point me at an British seller who will ship to France.

Cheers,

R.

I searched but unfortunately i could not find a UK seller. This seller from US seems pretty decent. In case you pay by paypal you won't have much to worry. Its also brand new and factory sealed: http://cgi.ebay.ca/ALL-NEW-KINDLE-3-WIRELESS-READING-DEVICE-WIFI-/130492371783?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e61f39347

Roger Hicks
03-08-2011, 05:55
I searched but unfortunately i could not find a UK seller. This seller from US seems pretty decent. In case you pay by paypal you won't have much to worry. Its also brand new and factory sealed: http://cgi.ebay.ca/ALL-NEW-KINDLE-3-WIRELESS-READING-DEVICE-WIFI-/130492371783?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e61f39347

That's very kind indeed, and I greatly appreciate it. If I can't get one via the UK I may well go there.

Thanks once again,

Cheers,

R.

mangie
03-08-2011, 10:01
Well, I'd buy a Kindle today if I could -- but I can't. I can pay for one, in dollars, with a very long delivery time and the likelihood of having to pay customs and handling fees. None of the UK stores seems willing to ship to France, despite the enormous advantages of easy shipping and no extra taxes. Does anyone know of a store in the UK that would ship to me? Note that in France they use the AZERTY keyboard, so even if I could get a French Kindle, it would drive me crazy.

As usual with Amazon, there's a nasty taste in the mouth from trying to deal with a company that wants to be a monopoly; will use every means it can to be a monopoly (including proprietary formats); and either fails to understand, or disregards, the fact that within the EU there is supposed to be free movement of goods and services.

Cheers,

R.

Mine came from Amazon - it is so quick and easy to download both free and paid for books from them, so I am sorry you are having such difficulties.

mangie

NickTrop
03-08-2011, 10:20
Roger - don't know it this helps

Where to Buy the Kindle in the UK?
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B002Y27P46?ie=UTF8&tag=ukreaders-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=B002Y27P46

Brings you to Amazon UK... They're pricey (compared to the US prices) though...

wjlapier
03-08-2011, 10:46
Do you have an itouch or iphone? If so, you can d/l the Kindle app and go from there. My wife has an itouch with the Kindle app and she is perfectly content to using it for reading books. I offered her a Kindle, but she is happy with her itouch.

I have an ipad with Apple's ibook and Kindle apps. ibook seems slower to me than the Kindle. One cool thing is we can share books between our devices if bought from amazon.

Roger Hicks
03-08-2011, 11:08
Roger - don't know it this helps

Where to Buy the Kindle in the UK?
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B002Y27P46?ie=UTF8&tag=ukreaders-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=B002Y27P46

Brings you to Amazon UK... They're pricey (compared to the US prices) though...

Dear Nick,

Thank'ee kindly but as far as I can see they won't ship outside the UK. You get referred to 'rest of world'. Amazon seems to be even more anti-EU than the English right wing.

Cheers,

R.

Roger Hicks
03-08-2011, 11:10
Do you have an itouch or iphone? If so, you can d/l the Kindle app and go from there. My wife has an itouch with the Kindle app and she is perfectly content to using it for reading books. I offered her a Kindle, but she is happy with her itouch.

I have an ipad with Apple's ibook and Kindle apps. ibook seems slower to me than the Kindle. One cool thing is we can share books between our devices if bought from amazon.

Thanks for the suggestion, but I have no iAnything and no need for one. Well, apart from this application, and I might as well buy a Kindle at that point.

Cheers,

R.

ampguy
03-08-2011, 11:18
John, I agree the kindle 3 contrast is low, but I wonder if it's by design to minimize fatigue? It is odd though, needing a reading light in low light, however, it's the same as with a real book. I do plan to get one of those lighted kindle covers. When they're on sale ...

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2010/04/ipad-kindle-ebook-sleep.html

Contrast is terrible, compared to paper or a computer screen. But it will improve with time, I think. The Kindle 3 has much better contrast than the Kindle 2.

Terao
03-08-2011, 15:13
Roger,

Not sure how exactly we'd go about doing this but I'd be happy to re-ship one to you from my address here in the UK. Amazon will let you send to an address other than your credit card billing address. We'd have to go on trust and pray that the vagaries of the international postal system didn't intervene, but it would be no problem. I've sold gear on here with no issues, and also on ebay under the user ID terao1970.

This post is brought to you in the spirit of the "lets buy Keith an X100" thread :)

yashica fellow
03-08-2011, 15:18
I have the kindle and a Ipad. With the ability to add all the wonderful books from Amazon, use the app on the Ipad to transfer all the books from my kindel, which is also a back-up. I get the best of both worlds. There are many apps available for the photo-phile from iTunes.
Best money I have spent for tech.

Terao
03-08-2011, 15:25
One of the great advantages of Kindle is that in general you get 5 copies of every book you buy (although this does depend on the licensing deal Amazon have with the publisher). With the wide variety of Kindle soft devices this means you can always have your Kindle books with you, or you and your partner/kids can be reading the same book at the same time. Being a bit of a gadget junkie (in my defence I look after this technology for a living) this means I have all my books on my Kindle3, iPod Touch, iPad, Home Mac, Work PC, and Android phone and they all stay in sync. Find myself reading a few pages on my phone whilst I wait for the bus or whatever, its great to always have a book with you without having to remember a physical copy.

As to being tied in to Amazon's proprietary format, you're not really. Check out some free software called Calibre - lets you manage and convert books from virtually any eBook format in to Kindle format. And all free of charge when you're on Wi-Fi or plugged in via USB.

MinorTones
03-08-2011, 16:08
I'm sure it has been said before; I like having a shelf full of books to lend to friends, to take up space in my apartment.

Kindles and the like are more environmentally friendly though. So I am torn.

If i don't buy books though it puts people out of work. What to do?

wgerrard
03-08-2011, 16:21
Roger, I bought a Kindle last year. My primary reason was to avoid adding additional clutter in the form of new books. I haven't had any readability problems using the screen, but it is nothing like the screen on this Mac. I waited until Amazon seemed to have enough Kindle books that I'd be likely to buy.

But, I'm still buying traditional books, even if they are available in Kindle format. I guess I just like holding and handling books. And my Kindle holds a queue of unread books, just like my shelves.

in the end, I'm just likely to buy more books, in both formats, than I did before the Kindle.

bhop73
03-08-2011, 16:26
I read a lot of sci-fi/fantasy novels, so I bought a Kindle last year to cut down on shelf storage for all those books since my apartment is small, space is limited. It's been great, but like others have said, I'd only use it for straight up reading.. photo books are better in printed form IMO.

deirdre
03-08-2011, 16:57
I have several dozen books on my iPad, including a couple of books about photography. In practice, I rarely read physical books any more.

NickTrop
03-08-2011, 18:48
10 years, maybe less... 95% of books will be electronic format. Everyone will have an e-reader, and 5% will be hold outs who like the tactile feel of books (or some such...) Need to put film in my Minolta Hi Matic AF2... gotta roll.

Ade-oh
03-08-2011, 23:16
I'm typing this, and I'm on rff on my daughter Kindle. Free 3g web browsing.

This is the big secret of the Kindle: it includes a web browser and with the free 3G, it means that you can access the internet when travelling without paying the iniquitous data fees that come with, for example, the iPhone. I've just been in Rome for a few days and, if I'd used my iPhone 3G data, I would have had to pay over 3/MB (double outside the EU). Kindle = free.

I've had one for nearly two years and find it very useful for travelling, but rarely use it when at home: books are better. Having said that, anyone looking for an interesting read can buy my latest book in a Kindle edition: PM me for details :D

Roger Hicks
03-09-2011, 01:35
Roger,

Not sure how exactly we'd go about doing this but I'd be happy to re-ship one to you from my address here in the UK. Amazon will let you send to an address other than your credit card billing address. We'd have to go on trust and pray that the vagaries of the international postal system didn't intervene, but it would be no problem. I've sold gear on here with no issues, and also on ebay under the user ID terao1970.

This post is brought to you in the spirit of the "lets buy Keith an X100" thread :)

That is an extremely kind offer and I will send you a PM.

Cheers,

R.

sol33
03-09-2011, 03:22
This is the big secret of the Kindle: it includes a web browser and with the free 3G, it means that you can access the internet when travelling without paying the iniquitous data fees that come with, for example, the iPhone. I've just been in Rome for a few days and, if I'd used my iPhone 3G data, I would have had to pay over 3/MB (double outside the EU). Kindle = free.

I ordered my Kindle in Spain, and while I am in Europe I can only access the Amazon shop and the English Wikipedia but not the Spanish (!) Wikipedia or any other web page at all. I have not been to the UK or US since, access may be better over there...

Ade-oh
03-09-2011, 04:46
I ordered my Kindle in Spain, and while I am in Europe I can only access the Amazon shop and the English Wikipedia but not the Spanish (!) Wikipedia or any other web page at all. I have not been to the UK or US since, access may be better over there...

Hmmm. Well, I've used the browser on mine to access the web in France, Germany, Portugal and Italy; mostly to send and receive email via webmail. Are you looking in the right place on yours? On the menu on my Kindle is an 'Experimental' heading, under which is 'basic web'. This should give you 3G web access.

Ben Z
03-09-2011, 05:32
No matter how I adjust them, those e-readers tire my eyes and eventually give me a headache. Computer screens do it too. Something about backlit vs reflected light according to my eye doctor. Printed books don't bother me. Looks like I'm stuck in the analog age at least as far as reading goes.

mabelsound
03-09-2011, 05:35
No matter how I adjust them, those e-readers tire my eyes and eventually give me a headache. Computer screens do it too. Something about backlit vs reflected light according to my eye doctor. Printed books don't bother me. Looks like I'm stuck in the analog age at least as far as reading goes.

If you haven't tried a Kindle, this is the main advantage of it--it's not a backlit screen. It's rather like paper--you need a lamp to read it.

One thing I learned about computers and the iPad, most people have screen brightness set ridiculously high. If you set up, say, your laptop next to a book in reasonable light, and adjust the laptop screen to match the brightness of the light reflected from the book, you might be surprised.

sol33
03-09-2011, 07:48
Hmmm. Well, I've used the browser on mine to access the web in France, Germany, Portugal and Italy; mostly to send and receive email via webmail. Are you looking in the right place on yours? On the menu on my Kindle is an 'Experimental' heading, under which is 'basic web'. This should give you 3G web access.

I did a bit of reading on the Internet. If you have your Kindle registered to an address in the US you apparently get free Internet in the US and roaming outside the US (which is not free). I can not verify this, but registering my Kindle either in Germany or Spain does not give me free Internet (except for the English Wikipedia, which is not bad). Instead it tells me: "Due to local restrictions, web browsing is not available for all countries". I wonder if I will get free web browsing in the US or the UK? Will try the next time.

ampguy
03-09-2011, 08:00
You can use the 3G (latest version, with 3G, bought in the US) with no roaming charges for any area covered by the Amazon Whispernet service:

http://client0.cellmaps.com/tabs.html#cellmaps_intl_tab

but be sure to abide by the terms of use for your Kindle, which are region specific. For example, some kindle books can now be lent to others for 14 days, but currently this is in the US only.

If you're in the US, you can use services like lendle.me to share lendable books with others.

bhop73
03-09-2011, 14:06
No matter how I adjust them, those e-readers tire my eyes and eventually give me a headache. Computer screens do it too. Something about backlit vs reflected light according to my eye doctor. Printed books don't bother me. Looks like I'm stuck in the analog age at least as far as reading goes.

As mabelsound mentioned already, the Kindle isn't backlit. It's pretty close to 'book-like' as far as electronic readers go. There is no refresh rate, which is probably what is really killing your eyes on monitors. The lack of page refreshing (until you turn the page) is also one of the reason the battery can last for months.

More on 'e-ink'
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_Ink

ampguy
03-09-2011, 16:03
pm sent on your book. Basically asked what it's about, how much it is, is it lendable, is there a preview, what's it called, whose the author. Thanks!

Hmmm. Well, I've used the browser on mine to access the web in France, Germany, Portugal and Italy; mostly to send and receive email via webmail. Are you looking in the right place on yours? On the menu on my Kindle is an 'Experimental' heading, under which is 'basic web'. This should give you 3G web access.

ZeMane
03-10-2011, 02:24
Hi Roger,

I got my Kindle3 (actually bought two) about one month ago, delivered from Amazon.com (USA) to Spain. I payed about 135 (each), including shipping and custom fees. It took 3 days to arrive to Madrid from somewhere in Nevada (Kindle's warehouse?), delivered by UPS.

I also checked prices in some european shops but could not find a cheaper one...

Cheers

Well, I'd buy a Kindle today if I could -- but I can't. I can pay for one, in dollars, with a very long delivery time and the likelihood of having to pay customs and handling fees. None of the UK stores seems willing to ship to France, despite the enormous advantages of easy shipping and no extra taxes. Does anyone know of a store in the UK that would ship to me? Note that in France they use the AZERTY keyboard, so even if I could get a French Kindle, it would drive me crazy.

As usual with Amazon, there's a nasty taste in the mouth from trying to deal with a company that wants to be a monopoly; will use every means it can to be a monopoly (including proprietary formats); and either fails to understand, or disregards, the fact that within the EU there is supposed to be free movement of goods and services.

Cheers,

R.

gilpen123
03-10-2011, 03:08
I have the Kindle 3 and the leather cover and I think it's one of the best gadget I bought in 2010. I bring it with me everywhere together with a Domke 803 and my camera.

Roger Hicks
03-10-2011, 07:46
Hi Roger,

I got my Kindle3 (actually bought two) about one month ago, delivered from Amazon.com (USA) to Spain. I payed about 135 (each), including shipping and custom fees. It took 3 days to arrive to Madrid from somewhere in Nevada (Kindle's warehouse?), delivered by UPS.

I also checked prices in some european shops but could not find a cheaper one...

Cheers

Ah... Now that's most encouraging.

Thanks a lot,

Cheers,

R.

NickTrop
03-10-2011, 08:14
Just - in general, and as others have stated, they're just better. Yes. E-readers are better than paper books, except anything that is a "picture book". Graphic novels, and photograph books. There is no back-light to hurt your eyes, there is no "refresh rate". You can adjust print size. They are very light, compact, and easy to carry anywhere. Some have robotic text-to-speech if you want to plod along a book while driving. They remember your page, new books cost less, there is a ton of free content available, you can get a book instantly where ever you are, and you can store 1000's of books on one - so you have access to whatever book you want when ever you want it, and there are no boxes of used unwanted books all over the place. It remembers the last page of any book you've read - no more folding pages, losing book markers, or losing your place. No more "lost" books. They hold a charge a ridiculously long time and charge up quickly... and last but not least they don't kill trees and good ones are affordable now.

Paper books that are mainly text? No advantage to them whatsoever. None. They'll be gone before film is. Everyone who resisted eReaders, including myself, did so because they "like the tactile feel of books, the smell, turing the page..." blah, blah, blah... You get past that in two seconds.

ampguy
03-10-2011, 08:26
The keyboards are all the same, all kindles use QWERTY keyboards. There is a difference in the 3G sim cards between the European and NA models, which might impact where you can browse to, but you'll always be able to get to the Amazon store, and probably wikipedia and google if there is 3G coverage of any type.

The biggest impact is probably where you are planning to register it, which will decide what books and magazines are available to you, and the prices you pay for them. There will probably be a list of advantages and disadvantages.

Amazon says it charges VAT, but no customs or other fees are required of the European buyers, who order direct from Amazon US.

Ah... Now that's most encouraging.

Thanks a lot,

Cheers,

R.

ampguy
03-10-2011, 08:34
I used to stuff my J803 slip pocket with magazines, now it's just the lighter kindle 3. Also fits fine in the f5xb pocket.

I have the Kindle 3 and the leather cover and I think it's one of the best gadget I bought in 2010. I bring it with me everywhere together with a Domke 803 and my camera.

Warren T.
03-10-2011, 08:42
I bought my Kindle 2/3G for $120 from someone who switched to an iPad. I love my Kindle. Because of the excellent E-Ink technology, I'm able to read outside in direct sunlight as if I was reading a hard copy book, and it has a reasonably long battery life (about a week or two). It lived up to its name, in that it re-kindled my interest in reading. The only downside is the dent in my wallet from buying all those e-books, due to my now voracious appetite for reading.

--Warren

ampguy
03-10-2011, 08:54
Let me know if you're into Romance Novels, and I'll see how we can get you some cheaper reading...

I bought my Kindle 2/3G for $120 from someone who switched to an iPad. I love my Kindle. Because of the excellent E-Ink technology, I'm able to read outside in direct sunlight as if I was reading a hard copy book, and it has a reasonably long battery life (about a week or two). It lived up to its name, in that it re-kindled my interest in reading. The only downside is the dent in my wallet from buying all those e-books, due to my now voracious appetite for reading.

--Warren

Roger Hicks
03-10-2011, 10:25
Just - in general, and as others have stated, they're just better. Yes. E-readers are better than paper books, except anything that is a "picture book". Graphic novels, and photograph books. There is no back-light to hurt your eyes, there is no "refresh rate". You can adjust print size. They are very light, compact, and easy to carry anywhere. Some have robotic text-to-speech if you want to plod along a book while driving. They remember your page, new books cost less, there is a ton of free content available, you can get a book instantly where ever you are, and you can store 1000's of books on one - so you have access to whatever book you want when ever you want it, and there are no boxes of used unwanted books all over the place. It remembers the last page of any book you've read - no more folding pages, losing book markers, or losing your place. No more "lost" books. They hold a charge a ridiculously long time and charge up quickly... and last but not least they don't kill trees and good ones are affordable now.

Paper books that are mainly text? No advantage to them whatsoever. None. They'll be gone before film is. Everyone who resisted eReaders, including myself, did so because they "like the tactile feel of books, the smell, turing the page..." blah, blah, blah... You get past that in two seconds.
Dear Nick,

Well, maybe you did. You may be over-projecting others' reactions.

Cheers,

R.

Roger Hicks
03-10-2011, 10:29
The keyboards are all the same, all kindles use QWERTY keyboards. There is a difference in the 3G sim cards between the European and NA models, which might impact where you can browse to, but you'll always be able to get to the Amazon store, and probably wikipedia and google if there is 3G coverage of any type.

The biggest impact is probably where you are planning to register it, which will decide what books and magazines are available to you, and the prices you pay for them. There will probably be a list of advantages and disadvantages.

Amazon says it charges VAT, but no customs or other fees are required of the European buyers, who order direct from Amazon US.

Thanks very much for that too. I am amazed that the Gauls have not yet launched a nuclear strike against non-QWERTY users. Well, all right, that's a slight exaggeration, but I have been here 8 years...

Cheers,

R.

mabelsound
03-10-2011, 10:41
Paper books that are mainly text? No advantage to them whatsoever. None. They'll be gone before film is. Everyone who resisted eReaders, including myself, did so because they "like the tactile feel of books, the smell, turing the page..." blah, blah, blah... You get past that in two seconds.

Mmmm...I smell claim chowder cookin'!

I do agree that e-ink readers are way better than I imagine they'd be, and will likely improve by leaps and bounds over the next few years.

ampguy
03-10-2011, 11:31
is if you're going to be making a lot of purchases (books, magazines, newspapers, etc.), the cost of the kindle itself is cheap relative to the content. So as crazy as this might initially sound, maybe buy 2, one for you, one for Francis. Buy one from the US, and register it in the US (some folks use a friends address, or even make an adress up, and fund it with gift cards), then get the 2nd one with European HW (they have Vodafone embedded sims instead of ATT, if 3G model), from either Amazon direct, or UK seller or reliable ebayer, wherever, and register that one in FR.

Then whenever you want to buy a book, or newspaper, check the availability on both, and purchase appropriately.

An added advantage, is when traveling, chances are one may have better 3G access to the web, depending on where you are. If you use google voice (not sure if it's available in Europe?), then your cell calls can be non-roaming as well, but initiated by the mini-browser on the kindle.


Thanks very much for that too. I am amazed that the Gauls have not yet launched a nuclear strike against non-QWERTY users. Well, all right, that's a slight exaggeration, but I have been here 8 years...

Cheers,

R.

robklurfield
03-10-2011, 11:57
e-books are great, but I wouldn't want a monograph of a favorite photographer on a kindle, nook or ....

Roger Hicks
03-10-2011, 11:57
is if you're going to be making a lot of purchases (books, magazines, newspapers, etc.), the cost of the kindle itself is cheap relative to the content. So as crazy as this might initially sound, maybe buy 2, one for you, one for Francis. Buy one from the US, and register it in the US (some folks use a friends address, or even make an adress up, and fund it with gift cards), then get the 2nd one with European HW (they have Vodafone embedded sims instead of ATT, if 3G model), from either Amazon direct, or UK seller or reliable ebayer, wherever, and register that one in FR.

Then whenever you want to buy a book, or newspaper, check the availability on both, and purchase appropriately.

An added advantage, is when traveling, chances are one may have better 3G access to the web, depending on where you are. If you use google voice (not sure if it's available in Europe?), then your cell calls can be non-roaming as well, but initiated by the mini-browser on the kindle.

Hmmmm... Not a lot of purchases, I'd think, but the cost is fairly trivial and tax-allowable... Certainly worth considering, for the 3G alone. Thanks very much for the idea.

Cheers,

R.

robklurfield
03-10-2011, 11:58
the notebook is very cool, sug.
Beauty of Kindle (especially the latest gen) is its light weight, size and low price tag. With iPad, I have to actually "think" about bringing it because of its size, weight (don't want to read hours on it) and replacement cost in case of loss/accident, but with Kindle, I just throw it in the back pocket of my notebook (Leuchtturm1917) and forget about it.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_kWxeki68O7I/TXUrXdMVQKI/AAAAAAAABZQ/YaEP2qrXJlo/s640/11%2011%3A00%3A43%20AM.jpg

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_kWxeki68O7I/TXUrUOVGl8I/AAAAAAAABZM/sI3smq9vv58/s640/11%2011%3A00%3A30%20AM.jpg

salan
04-01-2011, 08:06
I have a Kindle (got last Nov) 3G and I love it. I have Glaucoma and find it great to read.. In fact I have had trouble with a lot of modern books (including some of yours Roger) bacause the publishers all want this 'whiter then white' look so use paper that phosphoreses (sp?) for me and people like me (including anyone with scitopic sensitivty ie dyslexic).
With the Kindle I can read for hours. Also when I go on holiday, I can take a lot of books with me. I use mine for ref books a lot. Its not obvious from the marketing, but there are many places that sell books for the Kindle as well as Amazon (www.fictionwise.com (http://www.fictionwise.com) for example).
Its not perfect, but it pretty damn good.
I do have the Kindle app on my iphone and computer, but hardly use them.
Alan

pobe
04-01-2011, 09:06
I did get one a couple of weeks ago and I totally love it. Reading books like crazy! :)

Chris101
04-02-2011, 19:56
I gave my 10 yr. old girl (who loves electronics and gadgetry) a Kindle today, and she just told me that she's on Chapter 2 of Where the Mountain Meets the Moon already! I saw a little spark of loving to read in her a couple months ago, but the library here is atrocious. She told me she really liked Roald Dahl, and so I did the "other reader who bought this also bought ..." thingy and Volia!

Nomad Z
04-03-2011, 03:25
Dear Nick,

Well, maybe you did. You may be over-projecting others' reactions.
I think one has to consider how often the converse is the case. How many have tried a Kindle, said they didn't like it, and went back to paper books? To put it another way, what is the purpose of a paper book, if not to deliver a story/essay/etc? People don't buy sketchbooks just so they can turn the blank pages and enjoy the tactility of it all, do they?

Nick isn't far off with the notion that one is convinced within seconds - the eInk screen is thoroughly readable and the text is very clear. There is no fatigue when reading it. The battery life is excellent - it lasts weeks. I got the leather Filofax-style case for mine, and I find that the handling is better than a paper book. I read when I go to bed, so I prop the Kindle up on my chest with the front cover open perpendicular to the Kindle - I barely have to hold it, and just press the page button with my thumb. The thing is a revelation. I do not hestitate to call it the killer app for reading text electronically.

Roger Hicks
04-03-2011, 03:50
Well, I've bought one, and it's... OK. That's about all I'd say about it. I CERTAINLY wasn't convinced within seconds. Nor hours. Nor, indeed, days (I've had it about a week). I can see various advantages, but equally, I cannot ever imagine choosing to read a Kindle if I could get hold of a real ink-and-paper book containing the same information, unless I had to pay at least twice as much for the book (and even then, I'd probably go for the book). Nor, from canvassing friends and acquaintances, do I think I am alone in this.

Thanks very much to everyone who has contributed suggestions, ideas and accounts of their reactions to their Kindle. Now that I have one, and now that I have gone back over this thread, I am utterly convinced that there is an enormous degree of predisposition in whether one likes them or not. It would be very easy for the pro-Kindle brigade to dismiss those who are unimpressed as mindless reactionaries, and for those who are unimpressed to dismiss Kindle fans as slow readers who care more about technology than about reading. Neither assessment would be accurate, but then again, look at film-versus-digital and CD-versus-vinyl.

Cheers,

R.

thegman
04-03-2011, 04:01
Used to have one, but sold it as the range of of books did not suit my tastes. The availability of books is remarkably limited, if your tastes are even a little bit niche.

Also, it's one more thing to keep charged up.

It was good for one-handed use whilst hanging onto the tube, but that's about the only advantage for me. It's a nice device, and if they improved the range of books dramatically, priced them realistically (let's not pretend it costs as much to make a Kindle book as it does a paperback), then I could maybe be tempted back.

JoeV
04-03-2011, 06:41
As a sort of aside, I'd like to add that, if you are a fledgling writer and would like to see your work on the Kindle, save your document as a PDF, with the dimensions of the pages about 1/10" less than the Kindle's physical screen size. Then, when you connect the Kindle's USB to your computer, drag your PDF document into the Kindle's "documents" folder, and there you are - your own writings, on the Kindle.

~Joe

Roger Hicks
04-03-2011, 06:49
As a sort of aside, I'd like to add that, if you are a fledgling writer and would like to see your work on the Kindle, save your document as a PDF, with the dimensions of the pages about 1/10" less than the Kindle's physical screen size. Then, when you connect the Kindle's USB to your computer, drag your PDF document into the Kindle's "documents" folder, and there you are - your own writings, on the Kindle.

~Joe

Dear Joe,

That's fascinating: thanks. Because, by way of experiment, I've been thinking of publishing a novel simultaneously on Kindle and on paper (via Amazon Create Space -- anyone have any experience of this?) to see which sells better.

Why self-publish? Because I'm not known for novels, and besides, $1000 is a cheap way to see how electronic publishing works, and to see how the market works. If it works, I may do some Kindle stuff on traditional B+W photography: things that most publishers won't touch nowadays, because they're besotted with digital. And maybe some collections of columns and the like.

So, once again, thanks.

Cheers,

R.

salan
04-06-2011, 22:14
Roger
To me it is like cd verses lp an film v digital, but for certain circumstances it's the right tool for the job.
Like now, I am on holiday and. The kindle allows me to bring along a lot of ref books and novels to read.
Also for us people not fortunate enough to have 'normal' eyesight, it allows us to read.
I personally use talking books often( or my wife reads the book to me).
But you try getting a technical book as an audio book! No chance!
The world is full of compromises.
As I have said, I am on holiday and although I have brought my Linux GF1, I have also brought two film cameras.
A pen EE2 and an Agfa isolate.
They are for the times ' when a kindle just doesn't replace a book! Lol'
Alan

johannielscom
04-06-2011, 22:41
ignorant question:

if you add bookmarks to the book you are reading and later decide to copy it off the Kindle, will you have lost the bookmarks (connection between book and Kndle memory severed) or will the bookmarks be transferred to the file?

I.e., if I bookmark now and decide to upgrade to another device later, will my bookmarks be gone?

Ezzie
04-06-2011, 23:07
In our household we have the Kindle application on at least 5 devices, none of them a Kindle tablet however. Two Mac's, an iPad and two iPhones. And very soon the kids will have it on their iPods. Its revived the lust for reading, making it easy to access any book, anywhere (more or less). I considered the Kindle tablet, but found out I would want it to do more, and all of a sudden the iPad arrived. It fits the bill nicely, Kindle and iBook, Pixelmags and other digital publication applications make it the perfect written media consumption unit, not to mention pictures, videos and the internet as well. But Kindle remains the most used application.

javimm
04-07-2011, 00:23
I own a Hanlin V3, 6" screen e-book (Vizplex screen). I bought it in 2008. Hands down, best electronic purchase I've ever made, period. I've been using it daily for the past three years (I'm an avid reader). It's a pleasure to read on it.

I use it for reading novels , though. I prefer paper photography books.

pobe
04-08-2011, 00:55
I just discovered http://sendtoreader.com/ - a great way to read online articles :)

jpmac55
04-08-2011, 05:57
I have a Kindle, version 2. I like having a dedicated device for books, otherwise, I'd be easily distracted if I could access the internet. That's why I prefer it to the iPad.

For those wishing for a real book-like feel, check out http://www.dodocase.com/

Bike Tourist
06-08-2011, 09:04
As I awaited my Panasonic Lumix LX5, I downloaded a users manual on my Kindle. Now, I feel prepared to open the box when (if) it arrives as I am saturated with LX5 knowledge. By the way, I also have the same book on my computer where I can see it in glorious color.

Gazzah
06-08-2011, 09:18
I have had a sony reader for a few years. The cost of books is rediculous, so then main use it gets is to carry the PDF version of all the tec hie books I need to carry around.
I have the kindle app for my android tablet, the prices are much better and the range of titles is far greater than with sony..

But I still prefer to read the paper version..

G

darkkavenger
06-08-2011, 09:31
Hi, I just purchased one today. That's the reason why I've sold (and I'm still selling) some lenses (didn't want to impact my monthly budget: holidays, car maintenance, new stuff for baby). I am very much looking forward to receive it, as it will almost be a professional tool for me. I need to go through huge technical books to catch up with the latest technologies as well as preparing with various technological certifications (Microsoft, VMWare), and carrying either heavy books or my laptop was not getting me anywhere). I need the portability and an item that does what a book provides: text to read.

Reading on paper is better, but although I don't mind reading an adventure or historical book while on the train (as they are usually compact), reading a self-paced training kit from Microsoft is not exactly the same format. I am extremely curious about the text-to-speech feature, hopefully something I can put at use while driving or doing some other activity.

I'll get the device next week so I may comment about it on my (lately neglected) professional blog (www.kamshin.com).

My 2 cents,
Max

Bobbo
07-02-2011, 12:37
Bought my kindle Wi-Fi before a trip to Colorado in June. I didn't even need to take a laptop (couldn't anyway... I get warnings on startup about a potential crash and didn't want to mess with it), as I was able to read, check my email, surf RFF, etc.

Unfortunately, I got a call from work 4 days in and had to sit in on a conference call with corporate. Kindle web browser doesn't like Flash-based presentations too much :(. But hey, an iPad wouldn't have worked, either. Fortunately, someone I was with had a $250 netbook, and that worked out very well.

The $150 I paid ($139 plus sales tax for NY... thanks, Elliot Spitzer) was well worth it. Now, I just need a new laptop to replace the one that crapped out on me. I'm thinking a netbook with an SD card reader for my D90 would be fine. I'm not making movies, or anything fancy.

barnwulf
07-02-2011, 12:44
I have an iPad with a Kindle app. I haven't used the iPad for many things except for reading. I have had it only a short time and I plan to do more with it. Jim

Chris101
07-03-2011, 00:45
I gave my 10 yr. old girl (who loves electronics and gadgetry) a Kindle today, and she just told me that she's on Chapter 2 of Where the Mountain Meets the Moon already! I saw a little spark of loving to read in her a couple months ago, but the library here is atrocious. She told me she really liked Roald Dahl, and so I did the "other reader who bought this also bought ..." thingy and Volia!

She got 1/3 way through the book and gave up. She has red seeral paper books, but only because they were assigned. She tells me that she prefers TV anyway.

We can dress up reading like TV by putting it on an electronic device, but you still need to love to read in order to do it.

I'm taking the TV remote away.

StaaleS
07-03-2011, 01:01
I bought a Kindle recently and must say that I find it absolutely superb for reading books. The e-ink screen technology makes it almost useless for anything else but is just the thing for this application. And I got a leather-case with a built-in reading-light. I am now on holiday, I traveled by plane so was weight-limited but the Kindle has enough books in it to last me for months. Highly practical. The best gizmo I have bought for ages. Just don't confuse it with a pad; it is a different thing altogether and highly optimized for its one purpose: reading books.

Damaso
07-03-2011, 01:33
I've had a kindle for a few years now. As a traveler it has been a real boon.

mabelsound
07-03-2011, 05:17
If anyone's interested, my friend and I recently put out an e-only book of short stories and accompanying collage art:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Great-Zombini-ebook/dp/B004USM86M

21 stories for 4 bucks! That's about 20 cents a story, can't beat that. Well--maybe you can. But still.

Roger Hicks
07-14-2011, 10:54
My wife has a Kindle. I bought it for her birthday in April. We commute 50 miles each way to London every weekday and it's smaller, lighter and more convenient than a book.

The screen is very easy on the eye - no overly bright, backlit, shiny screen, hyper-contrast. You can store and access readily over 3,000 books (more than most people will ever read). The e-books are cheaper than the printed ones and, on a global basis, probably kinder to the environment.

When travelling, she can store guides and reference books instead of having to take weighty tomes around with us. The battery life is phenomenal - even for a daily user. There's a built in dictionary and other tools that help improve vocabulary and understanding of the books being read. It's smaller and more discrete than most "tablets".

E-books can be downloaded / bought in a matter of seconds and the choice of subject matter is huge and is only going to grow. Because of the lower publishing costs, it's probable that a wider variety of authors will see their books published - offering even more choice.

The only downside is that it doesn't offer colour images so that one could read magazines and photography books but that's a small price to pay for someone who just loves reading.

Unless, of course, they're black and white... (working on one right now).

Cheers,

R.

ampguy
07-14-2011, 17:18
Should be interesting! I take it the subjects will be something other than dead writers?? ;)


Unless, of course, they're black and white... (working on one right now).

Cheers,

R.

Ducky
07-14-2011, 20:10
If anyone's interested, my friend and I recently put out an e-only book of short stories and accompanying collage art:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Great-Zombini-ebook/dp/B004USM86M

21 stories for 4 bucks! That's about 20 cents a story, can't beat that. Well--maybe you can. But still.

I also have a small collection of short stories. You can see it here.

http://www.amazon.com/Three-Old-Men-collection-ebook/dp/B0052UKHSI/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1310702774&sr=1-1

I have not, nor do I expect to, make any money but it's kind of nice to see your own book in (sic) print??.

I also have photo books on Blurb. It's almost too easy but it is a feeling of creativity.

johne
07-27-2011, 08:33
27July2011
I was given one for fathr's day. Dubious at first. Now I am reading Gibbon, Heroditus, Josephus, accounts of Indians in the American west, and other things that previously I would have to go to a major library. I even found the WPA slave narratives. Refreshing!
John E.L.Robertson, 82
Professor Emeritus, UKCCS

Hatch
07-27-2011, 09:15
http://www.teleread.com/paul-biba/philips-develops-new-color-epaper-tech-more-bright-and-clear-than-lcds/

Read about this a while ago.
Think Philips sold the sub division that was busy with this to Samsung?

Apparantely the refresh rate is high enough to display movies.

If it has any colour fidelity it might take over from the LCD for a lot of applications

dave lackey
08-21-2011, 09:22
Can someone just explain why a Kindle is a must-have? I am not interested in buying 3500 books to carry around. I am not interested in reading except at home.

So, what is it about Kindle that would make me want to spend my grocery money on?:angel:

ampguy
08-21-2011, 09:37
and cheaper books. I have several hundred books that were on the kindle free page, that are now back up to 19.99 or so, many are in the top seller lists.

Now some of these I wouldn't have bought, but others were on my reading list.


Can someone just explain why a Kindle is a must-have? I am not interested in buying 3500 books to carry around. I am not interested in reading except at home.

So, what is it about Kindle that would make me want to spend my grocery money on?:angel:

dave lackey
08-21-2011, 09:44
and cheaper books. I have several hundred books that were on the kindle free page, that are now back up to 19.99 or so, many are in the top seller lists.

Now some of these I wouldn't have bought, but others were on my reading list.

Not convincing for me. I do an awful lot of research online everyday.

Constantly reading about a variety of topics, but rarely, full books as I had enough of that in law school. :p

But occasionally, say on vacation or during the winter, I may get into some light reading in the evening before dropping off to sleep. If I read, say 12 books a year (novels, etc.), how is a Kindle worth it to me?

Is there something else that Kindle offers besides having books to buy?:angel:

Roger Hicks
08-21-2011, 09:53
Can someone just explain why a Kindle is a must-have? I am not interested in buying 3500 books to carry around. I am not interested in reading except at home.

So, what is it about Kindle that would make me want to spend my grocery money on?:angel:
Dear Dave,

(1) Portability when you do travel, as many do, and need the information with you.. This includes commuting on the train, aeroplanes, waiting in government offices and Indian banks...That's why I'm working on revising Motorcycle Touring in Europe. Printed copies went as high as $25 in the decade after it went out of print (iin 1987 or so). At $9.95 it's a LOT of (updated) research you don't have to do for yourself.

(2) Cheap information. I'm also working on a PDF book on B+W. Projected price is $9.95 and it would be $29.95 printed.

(3) Convenience. That's why most (not all) of my future web stuff will be downloadable with Kindle in mind as well as A4 PDF.

"Must have"? No. Quite handy? Yes.

EDIT: Then again, I probably read well over 120 books a year. How long does a book take to read? A day or two?

Cheers,

R.

dave lackey
08-21-2011, 09:59
Dear Dave,

(1) Portability when you do travel, as many do, and need the information with you.. This includes commuting on the train, aeroplanes, waiting in government offices and Indian banks...That's why I'm working on revising Motorcycle Touring in Europe. Printed copies went as high as $25 in the decade after it went out of print (iin 1987 or so). At $9.95 it's a LOT of (updated) research you don't have to do for yourself.

(2) Cheap information. I'm also working on a PDF book on B+W. Projected price is $9.95 and it would be $29.95 printed.

(3) Convenience. That's why most (not all) of my future web stuff will be downloadable with Kindle in mind as well as A4 PDF.

"Must have"? No. Quite handy? Yes.

Cheers,

R.

I think I understand what you just wrote.

Still not working for me as I really don't understand how it would make life better at the expense of my not buying groceries for a week. For instance, as a photographer, I produce images, documentaries and other projects. I have no idea how to take, say, a documentary and can sell it on anything other than AdoramaPix website.

I care nothing about reading tons of books as I rarely read books outside of the home and then I do that in my own comfortable bed. Research is accomplished online at my desk.

I am open, however, as to how I can get Kindle to work for me rather than the other way around as a consumer making Kindle richer.:angel:

ampguy
08-21-2011, 10:10
It very possibly is not for you. If you don't read outside of bed, then regular books should be good for you.

Some other stuff I like it for is the ability to have email access almost anywhere. My son was off for a couple of weeks with only 3g access, and emailing from the minimal browser was much easier than from the smartphone I lent him.

Also, it's nice to have all of your camera and gear manuals online with you in searchable format.

Finally, when you find a quote while you're reading that you can't resist sharing on fb and twitter, a couple of button presses, and you can share it. And like a book, you can just go to sleep on it, roll over on it, and it will still be there in the morning, respecting you.

You can also get the first chapter of almost any kindle book free to see if you're going to like it. Check out the Lincoln Lawyer, or the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo trilogy. There's some stuff of legal interest in those books, and I think they're based on true stories, or partially.

I think I understand what you just wrote.

Still not working for me as I really don't understand how it would make life better at the expense of my not buying groceries for a week. For instance, as a photographer, I produce images, documentaries and other projects. I have no idea how to take, say, a documentary and can sell it on anything other than AdoramaPix website.

I care nothing about reading tons of books as I rarely read books outside of the home and then I do that in my own comfortable bed. Research is accomplished online at my desk.

I am open, however, as to how I can get Kindle to work for me rather than the other way around as a consumer making Kindle richer.:angel:

dave lackey
08-21-2011, 10:17
It very possibly is not for you. If you don't read outside of bed, then regular books should be good for you.

Some other stuff I like it for is the ability to have email access almost anywhere. My son was off for a couple of weeks with only 3g access, and emailing from the minimal browser was much easier than from the smartphone I lent him.

Also, it's nice to have all of your camera and gear manuals online with you in searchable format.

Finally, when you find a quote while you're reading that you can't resist sharing on fb and twitter, a couple of button presses, and you can share it. And like a book, you can just go to sleep on it, roll over on it, and it will still be there in the morning, respecting you.

You can also get the first chapter of almost any kindle book free to see if you're going to like it. Check out the Lincoln Lawyer, or the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo trilogy. There's some stuff of legal interest in those books, and I think they're based on true stories, or partially.

Ampguy, thanks, that helps with some of the things it can do.

1. What is the cost beyond buying a Kindle unit and purchasing a book? Is there a monthly user fee? Does one have to have a separate account, etc.?
2. Can a photographer place a book or other product with Kindle or anyone else and others can actually see the product and order it?

Ha, ha... something that respects you when you roll over on it in your sleep is okay IMO!:) Once had a yorkie and he wasn't happy!

John Camp
08-21-2011, 10:45
I have both an iPad and a Nook (Barnes and Nobles' 'Kindle') and was quite enthusiastic about them at first, and now use them only rarely. I've gone back almost exclusively to printed books. And I read a lot.

For me, electronic books are mostly good for reference works, such as travel guides. I also suspect they'd be good for authors who write technical books that need to be frequently updated, as with people who write photography or computer or software guides. If, for example, you wrote a guide for Lightroom 3, you could update it with each new revision, and keep your book absolutely current, where it might otherwise become obsolete. This would be especially useful in small technical niches where not huge numbers of books are sold.

They would be very useful for people who have limited access to good book stores.

The Kindle is somewhat crippled because it isn't yet offered in color, as far as I know. The Nook is, which means that it can reproduce color photographs, which is especially useful with guide books.

Unfortunately, none of the electronic books have put much emphasis on such things. Instead, they emphasize best-selling novels, which I find are more comfortably read in paper. Also, I find it much easier to browse books in bookstores -- there are a lot of visual cues to book quality that you don't see on an electronic book, and I want to browse extensively before I buy a novel. When I do find a book, I then go ahead and buy it on the spot, rather than noting it and buying it later on the Nook or iPad.

I find the greatest use for the iPad is in travel, with the cell-phone hookup for internet browsing. I have been driving across the American southwest, through small towns, have had my girlfriend use the iPad to check Starbucks locations, and had her take me directly to the proper exit, and then straight to the Starbucks. You can also look at maps, attractions, etc., as you travel. I do a lot of travel, and keep the iPad in the car.

I should note that the Nook has a common hack (Google "nook hack") that turns it into a fully functional Android tablet, just like a smart phone...the equivalent of an iPad.

Ctein, the well-known photo printer and photographer and free-lance genius, also recommends the iPad as a photo cache and review platform. I think it would be excellent for that, although I use a MacBook Air.

JC

Roger Hicks
08-21-2011, 11:03
Ampguy, thanks, that helps with some of the things it can do.

1. What is the cost beyond buying a Kindle unit and purchasing a book? Is there a monthly user fee? Does one have to have a separate account, etc.?
2. Can a photographer place a book or other product with Kindle or anyone else and others can actually see the product and order it?

Ha, ha... something that respects you when you roll over on it in your sleep is okay IMO!:) Once had a yorkie and he wasn't happy!

Dear Dave,

What is the cost beyond buying a Kindle unit and purchasing a book? Zero. You don't even have to purchase a book.

Is there a monthly user fee? No.

Does one have to have a separate account, etc.? No.

Can a photographer place a book or other product with Kindle or anyone else and others can actually see the product and order it? Yes.

I'd not consider it otherwise.

Cheers,

R.

Roger Hicks
08-21-2011, 11:06
I have both an iPad and a Nook (Barnes and Nobles' 'Kindle') and was quite enthusiastic about them at first, and now use them only rarely. I've gone back almost exclusively to printed books. And I read a lot.

For me, electronic books are mostly good for reference works, such as travel guides. I also suspect they'd be good for authors who write technical books that need to be frequently updated, as with people who write photography or computer or software guides. If, for example, you wrote a guide for Lightroom 3, you could update it with each new revision, and keep your book absolutely current, where it might otherwise become obsolete. This would be especially useful in small technical niches where not huge numbers of books are sold.

They would be very useful for people who have limited access to good book stores.

The Kindle is somewhat crippled because it isn't yet offered in color, as far as I know. The Nook is, which means that it can reproduce color photographs, which is especially useful with guide books.

Unfortunately, none of the electronic books have put much emphasis on such things. Instead, they emphasize best-selling novels, which I find are more comfortably read in paper. Also, I find it much easier to browse books in bookstores -- there are a lot of visual cues to book quality that you don't see on an electronic book, and I want to browse extensively before I buy a novel. When I do find a book, I then go ahead and buy it on the spot, rather than noting it and buying it later on the Nook or iPad.

I find the greatest use for the iPad is in travel, with the cell-phone hookup for internet browsing. I have been driving across the American southwest, through small towns, have had my girlfriend use the iPad to check Starbucks locations, and had her take me directly to the proper exit, and then straight to the Starbucks. You can also look at maps, attractions, etc., as you travel. I do a lot of travel, and keep the iPad in the car.

I should note that the Nook has a common hack (Google "nook hack") that turns it into a fully functional Android tablet, just like a smart phone...the equivalent of an iPad.

Ctein, the well-known photo printer and photographer and free-lance genius, also recommends the iPad as a photo cache and review platform. I think it would be excellent for that, although I use a MacBook Air.

JC

Dear John,

Exactly. That's why I'm gambling on its becoming (reasonably) popular with people who can read, rather than hardcore computer nerds.

But it's a gamble.

Cheers,

R.

dave lackey
08-21-2011, 12:16
Dear Dave,

What is the cost beyond buying a Kindle unit and purchasing a book? Zero. You don't even have to purchase a book.

Is there a monthly user fee? No.

Does one have to have a separate account, etc.? No.

Can a photographer place a book or other product with Kindle or anyone else and others can actually see the product and order it? Yes.

I'd not consider it otherwise.

Cheers,

R.

Cool...now someone can help by explaining how I would go about doing such a thing with my own book, etc. Is Amazon the way to go? Can I use the current link with Adorama? It would certainly be interesting because printing a full photo essay is expensive to say the least.:rolleyes:

Roger Hicks
08-21-2011, 12:29
Dear Dave,

Bear in mind it's a miserably small 9x12cm format. Will try to call soon to discuss the idea.

Cheers,

R.

wgerrard
08-21-2011, 14:02
Folks interested in publishing books with photos on an electronic platform should take a look at the sale figures for iPad, Kindle, Nook, etc., if they are actually available. iPad sales are leapfrogging everything else. HP, for example, introduced it's own iPad-killer in June, only to kill it this weekend.

An iPad is a much, much better platform for image display than a Kindle.

A Kindle app is available for the iPad, which effectively makes it a Kindle with a better screen. Amazon also recently rolled out a Kindle website that offers most of the functionality of the Kindle. If you have a Kindle account, you see the same thing in all three instances.

FalseDigital
08-21-2011, 14:45
^ I would never read a novel on an iPad screen...ever. It's an LCD screen and thus has a refresh rate. Which definitely gives me a headache if I look at too long without taking a break.

The kindle has E-INK. Which has no refresh rate as it doesn't move once it's set. Even if it's turned "off" the screen will always show the last image it was set to with our without power. Because it's static, this makes reading on a kindle the same as reading printed paper (to our eyes) which means I can read it forever without getting a headache.

I have a kindle. It's amazing FOR NOVELS.
If you read a lot novels this is the only reason to buy a kindle.
Also, I recently moved to Bangkok. English books are not cheap here. It's nice to be able to download my own books for free and read them.

Also, I'm not sure if it was mentioned before or not in the past 7 pages (as I didn't read all of them) but there is a free program that will convert any text/pdf/ebook/mobi document into kindle format. You can get it HERE (http://calibre-ebook.com/)

wgerrard
08-21-2011, 15:06
^ I would never read a novel on an iPad screen...ever. It's an LCD screen and thus has a refresh rate. Which definitely gives me a headache if I look at too long without taking a break.

I take your point. LCD's don't bother me, but I know they do others. The Kindle is also much easier to use outdoors.

I don't know if anyone has mentioned space constraints. That was a major factor in my decision to buy a Kindle a couple of years ago. I love the physicality of books, but I was running out of room to put them.

Also, when you relocate, it's easier and cheaper to drag 3,500 books along in a Kindle or a Nook or an iPad or whatever than in a truck.

hteasley
08-21-2011, 15:34
When we moved into our house in 2005, I had about 50, 60 boxes of books. It was heavy, and a royal pain. I read a lot, and would keep adding to the pile were it not for ebooks.

I've tried a bunch of ebook readers, reviewed some for a magazine I write for, and have settled on the Kindle app on an iPad. If the LCD refresh doesn't bug you, it's great. Batteries last a long time, no need for random other lights to read by, holds a ton, it's easy. I've read dozens of books on it.

Plus the iPad has some great multimedia books, like a wonderful edition of Alice in Wonderland that my daughters love. I'm reading the Mongoliad, a website by Neal Stephenson and Greg Bear which is sort of a serial novel, plus random art and such. There's an app for the iPad that makes reading on that a bit nicer than using the web browser.

When an iPad weighs as little as it does, and replaces hundreds of pounds of paper books (especially when traveling, where I can leave the big hardbacks at home), I see that as nothing but a good thing.

porktaco
08-21-2011, 16:33
i have a book and paper fetish. i love books. i love loving books. but, i HATE moving and storing books. i got a kindle about two months ago and i'm going to read down my Big Ol Pile o' Books in the house and then go kindle as much as possible. some books, like the wonderful _sea of poppies_, which have lots of foreign words and dialect slang and notes all bound up in a glossary in the back, suck on a kindle. they require you to flip to the back a lot. but books you can read in linear fashion are wonderful.

Vics
08-21-2011, 16:35
My daughter bought one to take on some long flights, and she seemed not to like it, mostly because it didn't do anything else, and because it was hard to navigate. Now, she's published in ebook form, and is interested in the concept. (Disclaimer: she does own a large independant book store.) I think she likes the idea of reading on her iPad more.
Roger, have you investigated (or been contacted by) http://www.subtext.com/ ?

Vics
08-21-2011, 17:50
I need a Kindle just to read this thread! Seven pages! Sheesh!

Ezzie
08-21-2011, 22:59
Dear Dave,

Bear in mind it's a miserably small 9x12cm format. Will try to call soon to discuss the idea.

Cheers,

R.
Had you been talking about celluloid then you'd not use the words miserably small I'd suspect ;)

I've bought two Kindles, one for my mum and one for my wife. Personally I use an iPad with Kindle being the most used app by far. I would consider a dedicated Kindle for three reasons (over an iPad). Size, battery and screen. The latter is a feat of engineering. yes you require light to read the Kindle, but the reflective screen is so good for reading, its a joke and not half bad for B+W imaging (considering size, price etc). I commend Amazon for their novel approach to energi effective screen technology, at the same time achieving such a wonderful result.

lacavol
08-21-2011, 23:58
I have the oiginal Kindle, waited 6 months for them to clear the backlog. IMO the kindle is the best for reading. I have used an ipad and laptop but the backlit screen kills your eyes when reading for an hour. I can't speak for the new ones but the kindle I have has only limited grayscale and isn't really suited for photographs. As for text it is the best and has the best battery life, it only uses power when you are changing pages or hooked up online.

wgerrard
08-22-2011, 07:41
Apple's been known to replace iPhones gratis at its stores, even out of warranty. Don't know about iPads. But, it's in their interest to spread a little good will and keep unhappy customers from posting online rants.

dave lackey
08-22-2011, 09:23
Okay, let me get a couple of things straight in my feeble mind.:p Since I am not thinking of just reading books with a lot of text...

If one has a Kindle, one can view a book in the form of a photo essay but it would be in black and white only. But how is the quality of the images?

If one were to move up to an iPad, one could use the Kindle app and do the same thing but would also be able to view color photos at a good resolution, correct? Plus all the other things an iPad can do...

And finally, for now :rolleyes:, Best Buy has a lot of options for iPad purchases. What is the best, meaning better than adequate at the most reasonable price, or is it the same ol same ol about the more the better (wifi, 64gb, etc.)?

Al Patterson
08-22-2011, 09:40
I have a Nook Color, which I intend to jailbreak and use as a tablet. Still rounding up the proper links and such.

FalseDigital
08-22-2011, 09:46
It's E-ink and and therefore cannot render images very well. Yes, they will render but it's not the same as a black and white tv rendering you might picture in your head.

I DO NOT recommend the kindle for viewing photos. Yes it can view them but definitely not in quality resolution,contrast, etc. It's more for reading novels. It can also read newspapers well too where images are there more as an aid to the story rather than a focal point.

Okay, let me get a couple of things straight in my feeble mind.:p Since I am not thinking of just reading books with a lot of text...

If one has a Kindle, one can view a book in the form of a photo essay but it would be in black and white only. But how is the quality of the images?

If one were to move up to an iPad, one could use the Kindle app and do the same thing but would also be able to view color photos at a good resolution, correct? Plus all the other things an iPad can do...

And finally, for now :rolleyes:, Best Buy has a lot of options for iPad purchases. What is the best, meaning better than adequate at the most reasonable price, or is it the same ol same ol about the more the better (wifi, 64gb, etc.)?

wgerrard
08-22-2011, 09:59
It's E-ink and and therefore cannot render images very well. Yes, they will render but it's not the same as a black and white tv rendering you might picture in your head.

I DO NOT recommend the kindle for viewing photos. Yes it can view them but definitely not in quality resolution,contrast, etc. It's more for reading novels. It can also read newspapers well too where images are there more as an aid to the story rather than a focal point.

Agree. The Kindle display is made to display text. The iPad uses the same kind of LCD display Apple uses in its other products. Photos viewed on my iPad look the same as on my desktop Mac.

dee
08-23-2011, 11:15
Is it OK to say I just like books which are kinda tactile ?
But , then I like Lps .

pggunn
08-23-2011, 17:59
I love my Kindle for reading. It really excels at that. The e-Ink technology is easy on the eyes and the interface gets out of your way for reading. As far as photography, I've found that PDF's display much better than jpegs or any other format I've tried - much better tonal range, resolution, everything - much better! I've produced multi-page PDF documents from my photographs that display pretty damn good on the Kindle.

Ultimately, the Kindle is perfect for reading. That's what I use it for and it performs very well for that - exactly what it's intended for. Just because it can do a few other things doesn't mean it's very good at them too. It's not an iPad, but then it doesn't cost what an iPad does either.

jl-lb.ms
08-24-2011, 12:16
Nook owner here (the Barnes and Noble version). I investigated the Kindle, but its downside was that it only let you obtain books from Amazon. The Nook uses open formats, and you can buy e-books from multiple online dealers, or you can even check e-books out of some public libraries. Also BN has a library of thousands of public domain books; many of them are crap scans of old manuscripts, but there are a few gems here and there.

The proprietary nature of the Kindle was what killed it for me.

Nomad Z
08-24-2011, 13:05
Calibre converts almost any e-book format to almost any other. That pretty much removes the proprietary nature of the Kindle, and was a factor in my buying one. The e-ink and battery life were other significant factors.

literiter
08-29-2011, 15:27
I don't have a Kindle, or any E-book for that matter. A sad silly old man I am.

But, last evening I set a book on the rail on our deck and it accidentally fell off. The drop was about 8 feet onto some stonework.

A page bent...I fixed it....the book is OK now.

pagpow
08-29-2011, 18:31
You can use the 3G (latest version, with 3G, bought in the US) with no roaming charges for any area covered by the Amazon Whispernet service:

http://client0.cellmaps.com/tabs.html#cellmaps_intl_tab

but be sure to abide by the terms of use for your Kindle, which are region specific. For example, some kindle books can now be lent to others for 14 days, but currently this is in the US only.

If you're in the US, you can use services like lendle.me to share lendable books with others.

Ampguy, Ade-oh, sol33,

Hi guys -- chosen because you talk about free 3G web-browsing outside the US.Just bought the latest Kindle 3 weeks ago, wi-fi only because I mistakenly thought the 3G gave me access ONLY to books outside wi-fi coverage.

Looks like I made an error. I am traveling increasingly. I have a MacBook Air but might like to leave it sometime.
Two questions:

1) Can any of you confirm free browsing on a US bought US address registered Kindle in the whole of the whispernet coverage area? Your postings seem to be in tension. I am particularly interested in Italy.

2) Any of you know whether a wi-fi kindle can be tethered to a cell phone for that purpose? I have unlimited data with the low Blackberry data roaming plan.

Thanks.

Giorgio

lacavol
08-29-2011, 19:23
You can put almost any book on the kindle. Most places have a variety of formats. Manybooks and Gutenberg project come to mind. So many books, so little time.

ampguy
08-29-2011, 20:17
I get free browsing throughout the areas I've tried in in the western US. But the browser is minimal, no flash, not a standard screen resolution. Generally, mobile web sites will be easier to navigate than a standard website.

Have not heard of anyone tethering via 3G with a kindle, but I can create a wifi hotspot with my phone, and have my kindle access amzn through wi-fi, but I think you're attempting the opposite. Have not heard of that being done. (certain functions, like sending user pdf's to the kindle are free via wi-fi, charge through 3G)

Ampguy, Ade-oh, sol33,

Hi guys -- chosen because you talk about free 3G web-browsing outside the US.Just bought the latest Kindle 3 weeks ago, wi-fi only because I mistakenly thought the 3G gave me access ONLY to books outside wi-fi coverage.

Looks like I made an error. I am traveling increasingly. I have a MacBook Air but might like to leave it sometime.
Two questions:

1) Can any of you confirm free browsing on a US bought US address registered Kindle in the whole of the whispernet coverage area? Your postings seem to be in tension. I am particularly interested in Italy.

2) Any of you know whether a wi-fi kindle can be tethered to a cell phone for that purpose? I have unlimited data with the low Blackberry data roaming plan.

Thanks.

Giorgio

pagpow
08-30-2011, 06:14
Thanks, ampguy, that's helpful.
Giorgio

lilmsmaggie
09-23-2011, 12:44
Just before Father's Day this year, I started pondering the purchase of an e-reader. I had noticed that I had my proclivity for purchasing books had led to them encroaching on just about every inch of free space in my house. There are books in the kitchen on the counters; books in the dinning room on the floor on the table and on some of the chairs; there are books in the living room, on the piano; books in a wicker basket; there are books in the bedroom on the floor, on the nightstand; on the chest-of-drawers; there are books in my office on the shelves of the bookcase, on my desk, on the floor -- they're everywhere!

So, I decided enough was enough. I took advantage of Amazon's Father's Day sale and bought a Kindle. The first week I had it, I must have read 2-3 books.

I think I like it :D

JohnTF
10-14-2011, 11:47
PMFJI, have not read all eight pages, but two things surprised me when using the 3G out of the country.

I subscribe to the International Herald Tribune and my local paper, there is a monthly charge for downloading out of the country, however, I called Kindle, got very good customer support and they changed my address to Mexico for the time I was there and no downloading charges for the paper.

There were no charges as I recall for any other downloads.

I have a lot less newspaper about the house, still not neat, but I suppose things could be worse, Hoarders has me on their 10 most wanted, beginning with Camera Collectors.

With the cost of weight in luggage, the Kindle has been an excellent buy.

I have not acquainted myself with the newer color Kindle.

Price of mine seemed reasonable, and shipping was quick, plus it arrived pre-registered as I already had an account with Amazon so they set it up before shipping.

I saw many of them around the hotel.

Regards, John

Guaranteed
10-16-2011, 04:05
I picked one up awhile ago using some gift cards so it worked out to be free and I couldn't be happier. I've done more reading in the past six months than I've managed in the prior fifteen years and I've still got a good amount of others to get through. Just for a goof I checked my local library website and found out I'm able to get books on my Kindle from there also. I guess that just means more coin for photography gear/workshops which is fine with me.

dee
03-23-2012, 14:06
I now have a kindle as a gift . Oddly , it seems just like reading on tracing paper , so familiar .
Useful for free classics which I would never otherwise bother with .
Neat pink cover too LOL

whitecat
03-23-2012, 14:29
I have one and like it. Built in light for reading at night. You can make the text white and the background black.

isoterica
03-23-2012, 14:48
Kindle Fire is color. iPad will read too. I have a Kindle, vacationed, it was nice on the plane. I think if we just used readers it would save a lot of house space given all the books we have here. But.. there is also something about having an illustrated paper book in hand too..

nighstar
03-24-2012, 03:46
i have a 2nd gen kindle. kindle on my phone. kindle on my tablet. kindle on my computer.

omg i http://emoticons4u.com/love/1273.gif kindle.

thegman
03-24-2012, 04:30
Used to have a Kindle, but sold it. At the time I had one, book availability was pretty weak, although it's better now.

For me, an eBook reader has very few advantages. The main ones are having many books on you at the same time, but I generally only read one book at a time. Also, there is the instant download, which is fantastic at airports etc. but all I need to do is think a few days ahead and order what I want.

The downsides are that it's one more thing to keep charged along with phone/MP3 player etc. graphics display is rubbish, even for B&W. For me it's not about making books better, it's about companies making money. Good for them of course, but I find real books better for the moment.

My career is in computing, so it's not new or exciting for me, just another electronic gadget, which I probably tired of 10 years ago.

mugent
03-24-2012, 04:33
Dues to a longish commute, I get through books very quirky, usually over 1 per week, every week, so a Kindle stops me from building up a massive load of books at home, which I'd need to sell, or give away.
Also, the instant delivery is a huge bonus, it means I've always got a book to read, regardless of if I'm near a book shop.
I think if you are a prolific reader, it makes sense, if you don't read many books, then in doesn't.

Bike Tourist
03-24-2012, 04:34
I've had a Kindle for about two years, during which time it has turned my brain to mush. I have read so much — fiction and nonfiction, I can't keep all these works in my mind. When I hear a title mentioned or hear of a movie based based on a book I think, "Oh yes, I've read that". But I can't recall what it's about! I have to go back and review it just to get a feel for the book again.

A classic case of:

A. Senility

or:

B. TMI

paulfish4570
03-24-2012, 04:41
i've had a kindle fire for three months. very convenient for buying books and keeping them from cluttering up the cabin. reading on the fire is taxing to my eyes so i have to be careful to rest a bit every few chapters. i repeat: so, so convenient.

Roger Hicks
03-24-2012, 14:54
From http://www.rogerandfrances.com/e-books.html

Proper, paper books are one of life's great pleasures. Think of the crisp pages of a new book: the sense of setting out on something exciting. Conversely, old books become like old friends, comfortable and familiar: you know where you are with them. But yet...

E-books have their advantages too. They can be (or should be) cheaper. They don't go out of print. They are easier to update. They are lighter to carry. And they can be a lot more specialized.

Cheers,

R.

Beemermark
03-25-2012, 17:41
I just bought a Kindle Fire and think it's fantastic. And I'm old school so this is my first jump into something like this. The fire is color and magazine and such are fantastic. The photo magazine are great.

Damaso
03-26-2012, 06:04
I travel so much I'd be lost without my Kindle. The days of lugging five or six books around so I have something to read in English are well behind me...

Roger Hicks
03-26-2012, 12:51
Roger - do you have any friends / family in the UK? Why not ask someone to buy it for you and send it to you....??

I have, and they did. See http://www.rogerandfrances.com/e-books.html -- a Kindle with the 'cover' of one on my books on it.

Cheers,

R.

AndySig
03-26-2012, 22:14
I was looking into this Kindle mullarkey yesterday. I think I will get one. It seems to me, however, that when getting something which represents a new departure, one needs to identify a precise role for it. I intend to use it for buying paperbacks which I know I would be unlikely to read a second time and therefore do not want on my bookshelves and for having a look at new authors. I will continue to buy books which I treasure as hardbacks and they will stay on my shelves. The other thing I really like about it is that one can subscribe to newspapers and have access to them e.g. while on a train journey in a foreign country.

Gadge
03-27-2012, 01:42
I have an early model. Pictures are rubbish but the product otherwise is great.
Mine is WiFi only which I do not find to be any problem.

If you buy one, pony up for the leather case that has a built in light, they are great for late night reading without disrupting anyone else in your bed or wherever (airplane, train etc) . The light is run from the Kindle itself yet it still lasts a good few weeks before you need to recharge it.

The coolest feature by far is that you can download a sample of any book before you buy it. I love that and use it all the time. If you like it, you can opt to buy the book directly from your Kindle when you finish the sample.

Like all dedicated devices, it far outperforms multi use items (Ipads, smartphones) at what it does best. Apparently not too hard to find lots of free books to read too ;-)

I love mine and thoroughly recommend it.

I have recently started using audiobooks whilst commuting though and my smartphone is the tool for that.

Guaranteed
03-30-2012, 08:42
Just picked myself up a Fire for convience instead of sitting at the computer. Lovin' it so far, only issue is I'm so used to the 3G/WiFi battery life this is going to have to take some getting used to.

Dogman
04-03-2012, 18:53
I bought a Kindle Keyboard 3G model about 3 months ago. I was not sure I would like it but it turns out I'm loving the silly thing. The physical size is much easier to handle than some hardbacks and the ability to adjust the type size is user friendly to my aging eyes. What finally pushed me into buying the Kindle came when my wife and I started cleaning out the attic and discovered all the forgotten boxed-up books we had no place to store and never intended to read again. We donated a large quantity of books to a local university to sell during their annual fund raiser. Now we're engaging in an anti-clutter campaign around the house.

While there is a multitude of free classic books available, it's really not so cheap to buy more recent e-books. And new releases are about the same price as a discounted hardback because publishers have bypassed the discount booksellers.

I'll continue to buy tactile paper books when it comes to photography although the home bookcases are pretty full of those already. I don't think I could ever get used to only seeing photographs on a screen. Photographs--real photographs--need to be on paper. For general reading, I prefer the Kindle.

guoshuo
04-03-2012, 19:01
dx, reading paper book now is hard for me, the font size, contrast and the thickness

Pablito
04-03-2012, 20:20
Yes, as a computer junkie, I hate the iPad (love the macbook airs though). But the Kindle is fantastic for reading books. Easy on the eyes. I like that it only does one thing. Like my phone, which I use only as... a phone.

jaredangle
04-04-2012, 20:16
I have a traditional Kindle, but I also have around one hundred books, which I take to be decent for a 22-year-old (And no, they're not Harry Potter, but there's some C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkein).

I've bought several books for reading on the Kindle, mainly e-books by politicians since I'm into political journalism. But I also just bought a used book on "The City in Modern Africa" which was printed in 1967, the year of my father's birth. It can be nice to read a book with the information and viewpoints that were prevalent during that time period, rather than whatever you'll find on Wikipedia today especially since Wikipedia has seemingly displaced Encyclopaedia Britannica.

markrich
04-08-2012, 02:52
I have a Sony PRS-1 reader to replace an older Sony 505 and use with Calibre on the Mac and Linux laptops.

Love it a lot with the greater flexibility on where to buy books.
I considered a Kindle but after Amazon reached into machines remotely deleted a book, ironically 1984 by Orwell, because they released it a week ahead of time, I decided to stay away.

Murchu
09-28-2012, 23:48
Bit late coming to this thread. Mine is basically my portable paperback mostly, but equally suffices for places where toting the physical book is a pain. All in all, kinda like a compact camera, you can take it with you everywhere, with minimal thought/ preparation. It has its weaknesses alright, prime amongst them being its unsuitability for reference material and also photography books. Converting mixed pdf's (text & images) can be a bit hit and miss, unless you are prepared to put in time to do so, so not a casual endeavour. Pdf's that are mainly text convert easily enough. Likewise, converting other ebook formats to kindle (.mobi) format, can also be a bit hit and miss, as although the kindle format is widespread enough, there are times when there are only epub/ other versions, and one must convert. Won't replace the paper back for me, nor would I want it to, but is a great solution for otherwise disposable books or ones I am uncertain about plunking down the cash for.

lxmike
09-30-2012, 13:59
I must admit I have a kindle and absolutely love it

Roger Hicks
09-30-2012, 14:05
Bit late coming to this thread. Mine is basically my portable paperback mostly, but equally suffices for places where toting the physical book is a pain. All in all, kinda like a compact camera, you can take it with you everywhere, with minimal thought/ preparation. It has its weaknesses alright, prime amongst them being its unsuitability for reference material and also photography books. Converting mixed pdf's (text & images) can be a bit hit and miss, unless you are prepared to put in time to do so, so not a casual endeavour. Pdf's that are mainly text convert easily enough. Likewise, converting other ebook formats to kindle (.mobi) format, can also be a bit hit and miss, as although the kindle format is widespread enough, there are times when there are only epub/ other versions, and one must convert. Won't replace the paper back for me, nor would I want it to, but is a great solution for otherwise disposable books or ones I am uncertain about plunking down the cash for.
Dear Damien,

Thanks for the thoughts. I think there may also be quite a Kindle market for travel books --the sort you carry with you. What do you think?

Cheers,

R.

RObert Budding
09-30-2012, 14:05
We're a 3-Kindle family. I like it, but my 13 y.o. son loves it. He has read hundreds of books on his, including a large volume of free books that are off copyright and available in Kindle format.

Roger Hicks
09-30-2012, 14:08
I must admit I have a kindle and absolutely love itThanks for the comment. Certainly, I've not met anyone yet whose attitude is unqualified disapproval. I certainly like mine far more than I expected. But is this because those who REALLY hate them are ashamed to admit they've made a mistake?

Cheers,

R.

Nomad Z
09-30-2012, 14:16
Thanks for the comment. Certainly, I've not met anyone yet whose attitude is unqualified disapproval. I certainly like mine far more than I expected. But is this because those who REALLY hate them are ashamed to admit they've made a mistake?

Nah. If there were Kindle haters out there, there would be posts on forums about it by now. (Maybe there are - I don't care enough to actually go looking.) My anecdotal experience is the same as yours - the Kindle (or the e-reader in general) is, like digital watches, a pretty neat idea.

Roger Hicks
09-30-2012, 14:19
Nah. If there were Kindle haters out there, there would be posts on forums about it by now. (Maybe there are - I don't care enough to actually go looking.) My anecdotal experience is the same as yours - the Kindle (or the e-reader in general) is, like digital watches, a pretty neat idea.
Good point! Not just posts: whole forums.

Thanks,

R.

flip
09-30-2012, 14:19
No kindle here, but a nook simple touch instead. I like the form factor and the fact that with an android install I can read just about any format. I now have my nose in a book way more often than in recent years.

Pioneer
09-30-2012, 14:58
I use the older Kindle and I love it. I can carry hundreds of volumes in one small folder shaped kindle. I have picked up several photo books but since my Kindle has no color so it is obviously better for black and white discussion then for color books.

RichC
09-30-2012, 15:18
This is my Kindle...

Part of my "Digital Archaeology" project (http://richcutler.co.uk/portfolio-2)

http://richcutler.co.uk/data/portfolio/digital_archaeol/04-Kindle.jpg

Vics
09-30-2012, 15:38
My daughtrer gave me her Kindle (basic B&W) and I occaisionally read something on it. I like not having to keep my place or hold the book open as I'm reading . I'm currently reading a paperback edition of David McDullough's "Truman" and it weighs a ton. I also like all the free books on Amazon.

River Dog
09-30-2012, 15:41
Wife has a new Kindle. The contrast is unreadable in normal room lighting, in the evening. She carries an angle-poise lamp around the house with her now and she has 20/20 vision.

FrozenInTime
09-30-2012, 15:53
The contrast is unreadable in normal room lighting, in the evening. She carries an angle-poise lamp around the house with her

The first Kindle to interest me is the new paperwhite version that sun readable B&W screen but also built in front lighting.
It solves three ipad short fallings - weight, battery life and sunlight readability.
It should arrive sometime this week.

Dwig
09-30-2012, 15:58
I've had a Kindle (Gen 3 aka Kindle Keyboard) for roughly 2 years now. It's the latest in a long line of reading devices. I've been reading ebooks for 20 years now, originally on a PC as real world handheld devices didn't exist at the time.

I find my Kindle every bit as readable as any paperback and most hardbacks. Only a very few of my best expensively printed hardbacks can beat it, and then in very low light the ability to adjust the font size larger gives the Kindle an edge.

I began reading ebooks to get easy access to older public domain books. The vast majority of my ebook reading (~300-500 books, though many were single short stories) has been public domain works. Most of the newer books that I've read were paper, mostly hardback. It's unlikely that I will ever buy a paperback again. In the last year, I've read 3-4 hardbacks, 0 paperbacks, and about 30 or so ebook titles (a mix of single short stories and longer works).

hausen
09-30-2012, 16:26
I downloaded Kindle to my Macbook Air 11".

mabelsound
09-30-2012, 16:26
This is my Kindle...

Part of my "Digital Archaeology" project (http://richcutler.co.uk/portfolio-2)

Those are great photos. How did you get the devices to age so rapidly? Really beautiful. The DS especially.

RichC
10-01-2012, 00:51
Those are great photos. How did you get the devices to age so rapidly? Really beautiful. The DS especially.

Thanks. Also bear in mind that the photographs are meant to be viewed as 4 foot tall prints mounted next to each other on a wall so that they dominate the viewer - monolithic tombstones to technology...

As to the how... First, I prefer to get things right in front of the lens, so the ageing is real not Photoshop.

All the devices had to look at least decades old - it was crucial that they did not appear just battered; they had to seem incongruous - recent technology far older than it could possibly be. I also wanted the objects to look like they'd come from different environments (a forest, a shed, the sea, etc.).

Bearing the above in mind, I tried to imagine how the objects would look. Taking the Nintendo, I wanted it to appear as if it'd been in the sea for years. So, I bought a few broken ones and experimented. In the end, I hacked it around a bit, put it in the oven until it warped, and played a blowtorch over it (that produced that brown crazed appearance). Next, I touched it up here and there with paint, rubbed sand and dirt over it, and glued barnacles over it!

(Techniques for some of the other devices including soaking in concentrated and very corrosive acid.)

Bottom line was that it had to look realistic as a 4 foot print! In reality, the devices would weather and wear differently - I'm sure in real life the objects wouldn't look quite as visually interesting. However, if my aged devices seem as if they *could* exist, I'm happy.

Lastly, some people ask why I show photographs and not the objects for this project. The answer is that I think there's a huge difference between how we relate to photographs compared with how we perceive actual objects, such as sculptures: with photographs, we can more easily suspend our belief, and thus accept fiction as truth (because of photography's close relationship with reality and truth - which remains even in today's world of digital images). Think of the difference in how we perceive a painting of someone compared with a photo - we instinctively as a culture take the former as subjective and the latter as objective - albeit this is of course tempered by all sorts of things such as context.

B.J.Scharp
10-01-2012, 23:30
Two Kindle Touch devices in our household. As said before, perfect for reading books, not so interesting for photography.

I don't get the comments about it being unsuitable for reference books. In a properly type-set ebook, you can link all over the place (from the TOC to the page, from refences to appendices, etc). Anything you can do in HTML or PDF, you can do in an ebook. It think the mistake people make is reading pdf on their ebooks, or using a basic converter from PDF to an ebook format.

That's kind of like making flat scans of a book, that also doesn't give you proper links. If you get your books in ebook format, you shouldn't have any problems. (For a reasonably good example, get the ebook version of Erwin Puts' Leica Chronicle.)

Also, for converting between different ebook formats (epub, mobi, etc), I recommend Calibre (http://calibre-ebook.com/), easily the best digital library software around. If you need to do more than just convert (adding TOC and links, for example), Sigil (https://code.google.com/p/sigil/) is a very good and easy to use ebook creator.

markrich
10-01-2012, 23:35
I have two Sony eReaders and a Sony Xperia Tablet S. The former are perfect for reading novels etc. and great on the eye. The Tablet is excellent for reference books because of the colour and larger screen. For photo books the tablet is excellent as the weight difference over a slab of processed tree in the bag is noticeable. Of course for home, I want that bound paper deliciousness known as a hardback book :-)

Dogman
10-09-2012, 04:58
Although I still like the Kindle, the price of eBooks is something that sort of tempers the affection. For light casual reading, used paperbacks are available everywhere, cheap and can be traded in or resold. The Kindle eBook version is convenient but comparatively expensive. I've found I shop more carefully when it comes to buying eBooks.

Even with my reservations, I'm looking forward to the Kindle HD tablet. The price and features are very attractive.

icebear
10-09-2012, 11:11
Nope, still prefer the good old printed NYT edition to smack a roach, try that with an e-reader :D.

ChrisN
10-09-2012, 16:55
KIndle Touch here, and find it very useful, especially for travel. I'm slowly collecting kindle versions of old favourites from our paperback collection that are either falling apart or turning so brown that they are getting hard to read (or to find in our 4000+ collection).

Are people aware that you can often download free books in simple text format (.txt files) and manually download them to the kindle?

gilpen123
10-09-2012, 17:11
Kindle Touch and ordered already the Paper White with built in backlight. Very useful indeed for me not only during travel but also idle time like waiting for wife while shopping, waiting for my food order to be served, in an auto repair shop and many many more usage.

JayM
10-09-2012, 17:22
My girlfriend has a Kindle that I use exclusively (and regularly) for fiction as it's something I'm unlikely to study in great detail, reference in great detail, or interact with after I've finished it.

Non-fiction as well as books of art are things that I intend to use over and over. I would not and do not use or want digital versions of things like this. Magazines are also something that I do not want digitally.

Al Patterson
10-09-2012, 17:27
I have a Nook Color, and have ordered the HD+ 9 inch version. I'd buy a decent photo book for under $10 direct from the author before I pay $20 plus from AMZN or B&N...

The Nook is easier to carry than my Toshiba laptop by far.

denizg7
11-17-2012, 22:55
I just returned my recently bought regular kindle..

I am waiting for a sharp text coloured tablet for magazine reading..

The new ipad 3 hopefully is sharp enough to read black and white text.. There is a kindle app in there too..

Al Patterson
11-20-2012, 17:52
I just returned my recently bought regular kindle..

I am waiting for a sharp text coloured tablet for magazine reading..

The new ipad 3 hopefully is sharp enough to read black and white text.. There is a kindle app in there too..

The large Nook looks great with the LL Bean catalog. I am thinking of getting Shutterbug on it.

denizg7
11-20-2012, 18:46
The large Nook looks great with the LL Bean catalog. I am thinking of getting Shutterbug on it.

how is it for reading plain black and white text?

FeiTow
11-20-2012, 18:48
I just got the new Nexus 7 tablet and the screen is amazing! Has a higher resolution than the Ipad mini. I also have an old Samsung 7" tablet when it first came out and have been using ereaders in the last couple of years since my eyes are so bad. The Kindle 3 was my first and went to tablets because I can read PDF files easily...

denizg7
11-20-2012, 18:52
I just got the new Nexus 7 tablet and the screen is amazing! Has a higher resolution than the Ipad mini. I also have an old Samsung 7" tablet when it first came out and have been using ereaders in the last couple of years since my eyes are so bad. The Kindle 3 was my first and went to tablets because I can read PDF files easily...

but which one is the best for colour and plain text...

Vics
11-20-2012, 18:54
Roger, I really think I'm hooked on the Kindle. I'd like a better, newer one with better graphics and color and optional backlight. We'll see at Christmas. I love the free bookstore at Amazon! I'd buy all of your books in Kindle format...

Al Patterson
11-20-2012, 19:30
how is it for reading plain black and white text?

Not bad, but I bought it more as a portable internet device. Larger than the iPad mini, and cheaper.

I do have a few short books, but i would rather use the smaller one for long reading sessions.

Pavel+
01-15-2013, 17:15
I've had three over the years and really like them. They aren't like a real book however. No ... I have a hard time fitting forty real books into my rear pocket or small bag and my real books keep loosing the page I was on.
But occasionally I still pick up a "real" book ... for nostalgia's sake. ;)

maddoc
01-15-2013, 17:27
Just received my "Paperwhite" last weekend, already copied all the scientific papers and books I have as PDF files onto it and bought one book from Amazon. I want to use it on business-trips to have all important papers with me in case I need them without carrying to much weight. :)

gilpen123
01-15-2013, 17:48
Paperwhite Kindle has very good contrast on both dark and bright light. I highly recommend it's night and day vs the older Kindle.

randolph45
01-15-2013, 18:27
My ten inch tablet works great with kindle app and several other apps for books .As for notes in books I never have written notes on the pages.:o

Al Patterson
01-15-2013, 19:13
My ten inch tablet works great with kindle app and several other apps for books .As for notes in books I never have written notes on the pages.:o

Which 10 inch tablet do you have? I have seen the iPad and the 10 inch Samsung tablet, but I currently have a 9 inch Nook.

1joel1
01-17-2013, 06:53
Paperwhite here. It's great and you can read in bed without a nightlight. Text is perfect and the charge will last nearly 2 months, wow. The browser is crap so I don't use it. Only for reading, otherwise I would get an iPad.

Joel

Dogman
02-28-2013, 14:46
My wife bought a Kindle Fire HD 8.9 for my birthday this month. While it's heavier and slipperier to hold than my Kindle Keyboard and the touch feature takes some getting used to, I'm beginning to really enjoy it's tablet features.

nikonosguy
02-28-2013, 15:41
here's mine

GaryLH
02-28-2013, 16:05
For me right now there are only two players w/ the content...
- Apple w/ it's various flavors of the iPad.
- Amazon w/ all the kindles from paper white to fire HD
Otherwise if u don't need the content then nexus is the way to go..

Nothing beats the Kindle paper white for a pure reading experience in terms of traditional books unless u are talking about books w/ color pictures, then the kindle HD and the iPad start to come into the picture.

I feel where iPad is strong is App Store content, music and video. Amazon is catching up on the music and video fairly well and may in fact depending on what u are after is doing better. Especially if u are an amazon prime member, tons of free video streamed straight to your kindle fire HD. On the app front, android is catching up very fast. On a personal taste I like the overall UI better on iOS.. The kindle fire HD carousel approach is not bad though.

If u are a gamer, the iPad may have a slight edge due to system on a chip design (soc). Not sure since I am don't play games any longer outside of simple stuff that does not need graphics horsepower.

Anyway I love my kindle paper white.. I have an old iPad 2.. Now two generations behind and I don't see a reason to upgrade it. I had serious considered upgrading to iPad mini for travel until I took a closer look at the fire HD 7.. Slightly smaller than the mini, not quite as powerful, but as a consumption device on the road at a price over 100 dollars cheaper, what can I say. If it gets stolen or I loose it on the road, at 199 I may cry a bit, but I can live with it compared to losing a iPad of any type on the road..

Gary