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Mike Kovacs
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 03:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does anyone have some notes on the Seiko view camera shutter?

I have a #0 size one here that I can't quite figure the problem with - I think the blades are stuck together but darned if I can figure out the blade actuator mechanism.
rick
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 03:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't have anything specific to that shutter, but some general stuff on various leaf shutters. is this one odd?
mike kovacs
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 03:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I *think* the shutter leafs are stuck together but I have to figure out the blade actuator function. Also, I cannot seem to get the release to function without moving the levers around with my screwdriver. Maybe its stuck part cycle?

I guess its always a little harder when what I get is broken and new to me.

Hope I get it because its attached to a really nice Fujinon-SW wide angle 4x5 lens!
rick
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 05:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

See if any of these things help - I don't know if they will but you might get lucky:

http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-158.html
http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-55.html
http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/leaf_shutter_cla.htm
http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-88.html

rick : ) =
Mike Kovacs
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 05:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Rick - I do know the guts of Compur shutters intimately but this one works quite differently. The mainspring is on a geared piece that interfaces with the cocking ring.

It looks like the shutter may have been originally designed with a self timer and/or M-synch, because one end is completely empty, has another gear on the cocking ring opposite this empty space, and a pallet without a matching star gear left of the shutter release.

http://daniel.mitchell.name/cameras/seikosha/seikosha.html

Looking on Dan Mitchell's site, it appears to be quite similar to the earlier Seikosha and he does mention that later models were shipped without M-synch or self timers.

When I take the main spring off, I have not been able to actuate the shutter leaves, so I assume they must be stuck. Will brave the job and pull the whole thing apart :)
rick
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 08:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I didn't think any of that stuff would be new to you. Try poking around for a little latch that holds the blades closed. I can't recall right now exactly where to go poking, but it's around the inner wall of the shutter where the blade actuating ring is......
Wayne
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 04:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Mike

That Seikosha looks quite similar to the later Compurs. The part that the mainspring sits on opens and closes the shutter blades as it spins around as I recall. I've worked on smaller Seiko shutters in the past, but I can't remember the details now (I really should make notes like Rick does...).

I've got one of the later Compur shutters at home that I can poke around in if you want to know anything specific (or I could open up a Mamiya TLR lens with a Seiko shutter).

Cheers
Wayne
Winfried
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 02:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Most japanese leaf shutters are rather clones of the Prontor shutters than of the Compur shutters. The main difference is that on Prontor-design shutters there is a spring-loaded crank attached to the cocking shaft which pushes the actuator ring of the blades forward and backward. This cocking shaft also interferes (more or less depending on speed setting) with a lever protruding from the speed escapement.

On Compur shutters, even on the later ones with a cocking shaft and a wound spring instead of a tension spring, there is an intermediate ring (driven by the tension spring or by a gear on the cocking shaft) of which a tab runs across the speed escapement.

For repairs on Prontor-design shutters you can refer to instructions concerning Copal shutters. They are all very similar. You will find quite a few hints on

www.daniel.mitchell.name
Winfried
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 02:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Most japanese leaf shutters are rather clones of the Prontor shutters than of the Compur shutters. The main difference is that on Prontor-design shutters there is a spring-loaded crank attached to the cocking shaft which pushes the actuator ring of the blades forward and backward. This cocking shaft also interferes (more or less depending on speed setting) with a lever protruding from the speed escapement.

On Compur shutters, even on the later ones with a cocking shaft and a wound spring instead of a tension spring, there is an intermediate ring (driven by the tension spring or by a gear on the cocking shaft) of which a tab runs across the speed escapement.

For repairs on Prontor-design shutters you can refer to instructions concerning Copal shutters. They are all very similar. You will find quite a few hints on

www.daniel.mitchell.name
Winfried
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 02:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Most japanese leaf shutters are rather clones of the Prontor shutters than of the Compur shutters. The main difference is that on Prontor-design shutters there is a spring-loaded crank attached to the cocking shaft which pushes the actuator ring of the blades forward and backward. This cocking shaft also interferes (more or less depending on speed setting) with a lever protruding from the speed escapement.

On Compur shutters, even on the later ones with a cocking shaft and a wound spring instead of a tension spring attached to a cocking rack, there is an intermediate ring (driven by the tension spring or by a gear on the cocking shaft) of which a tab runs across the speed escapement.

For repairs on Prontor-design shutters you can refer to instructions concerning Copal shutters. They are all very similar. You will find quite a few hints on

www.daniel.mitchell.name
mike kovacs
Posted on Friday, October 21, 2005 - 06:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thanks guys - I've got this one working now

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