Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Non Rangefinder Cameras > Digital Fixed Lens Advanced Compacts > Leica Fixed Lens Compacts

Leica Fixed Lens Compacts For the many and varied fixed lens Leica digital compact cameras

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes

Using the Leica X camera as a system
Old 11-01-2012   #1
dave lackey
Registered User
 
dave lackey's Avatar
 
dave lackey is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 6,727
Using the Leica X camera as a system

This week has been productive. How about you folks?

Instead of just shooting "The Deep South" documentary with the X1 (and film Leicas), I am working the X1 into a system that works for me and my own workflow.

As a natural light shooter, it is sometimes difficult to use a flash but there are times it is needed. I have begun using my old Nikon SB24 and the zoom/swivel/rotation options are very useful! Even set it up on the tripod and it works well. Now to get a slave flash for the other tripod.

While on location, it would be nice to not only show portfolio work, but using the Ipad or Ipad mini will be useful to check the images being shot before I leave the shoot location. Nothing worse than having clients/models, etc. coming back because focus/composition/content/lighting or something was not optimal.

I have the whole macro thing worked out and it is working amazing well.

Telephoto? Not sure but a D-Lux 6 would be a great complement.

Why a D-Lux 6? Smallness, fast lens, telephoto capabilities, decent IQ, and will fit in a very small bag/pockets along with the X1, Ipad mini and flash.

For film images, I still use the M3 and R4 for black and white. But not all the time, because the X1 makes life a lot simpler for some things by itself.

I am still stretching the envelope with my own X1 kit and am looking for better ways to use it as a system. It is all fun!

How about you folks? Whatcha doing?
__________________
Peace, Love and Happiness...



Dave
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-01-2012   #2
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 3,218
Creative light control brings the best out of any camera. An off-camera strobe is simplest and least expensive way to add creative lighting to your photography.

The Nikon SB-80 strobe has a very sensitive and reliable optical trigger. It is a good candidate for a second, remote strobe. Unfortunately people who do off-camera strobe work know this and used SB-80s average $150. I use up to 6 of these and I get them from KEH. Unlike the SB-24, the SB-80's power is adjustable in 1/3 stop septs down to 1/128 power. There are inexpensive Chinese knock offs for the SB-80, but I forget their name. I found optical hot shoes to be totally unreliable triggers and when they did work they were insensitive. If you will always be close to the remote strobe, then a high-quality optical hot shoe may suffice. Wired connections are inconvenient at best. The strobe wire and connectors do not hold up so you must have a back up set. This is why I discussed opitcal triggers. Inexpensive radio triggers are a waste of money. Trust me on this. Reliable radio triggers are expensive.

I have no idea what sort of tripod you have for the remote strobe. It is often useful to have a light up high to bounce into the ceiling corner of the room. This avoids odd ceiling colors from light sources with mixed color temperatures. A cheap tall light stand is more useful than a standard tripod. Ther are a variety of small clamps with strobe cold shoe mounts. These can mount a flash atop a door which is another way to bounce light around high up to light ceilings.

You mentioned you prefer natural light. I think an inexpensive, but decent size, white shoot-thru umbrella would be an useful diffuser. Well-placed reflectors are able to increase the impact of a single remote strobe. Thin, white foam-core panels are inexpensive and readily available at home supply and art supply stores. These make great reflectors. You can glue aluminum foil to one side, but I just use the white side for a often light. Cheap plastic clamps are useful to hold the reflectors. To minimize expenses, you can build home made reflector stands out of small diameter plastic plumbing pipe and fittings. If you spray paint these black, clients don't notice they are home made. One of the cheapest ways to create lovely soft light is hanging thin, white, disposable plastic picnic table covers from stands. Just place the strobe behind the stands. If you must tape reflectors to walls or doors, use high-quality painters tape. But taping should be a last resort since there is always a chance for damage when you remove the tape.

A blog called The Stobist is invaluable for anyone interested in inexpensive off-camera lighting.
__________________
"Perspective is governed by where you stand object size and the angle of view included in the picture is determined by focal length." H.S. Newcombe

Self-Induced Transparency Photography, FLICKR, Professional Portfolio.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-01-2012   #3
dave lackey
Registered User
 
dave lackey's Avatar
 
dave lackey is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 6,727
Quote:
Originally Posted by willie_901 View Post
Creative light control brings the best out of any camera. An off-camera strobe is simplest and least expensive way to add creative lighting to your photography.

The Nikon SB-80 strobe has a very sensitive and reliable optical trigger. It is a good candidate for a second, remote strobe. Unfortunately people who do off-camera strobe work know this and used SB-80s average $150. I use up to 6 of these and I get them from KEH. Unlike the SB-24, the SB-80's power is adjustable in 1/3 stop septs down to 1/128 power. There are inexpensive Chinese knock offs for the SB-80, but I forget their name. I found optical hot shoes to be totally unreliable triggers and when they did work they were insensitive. If you will always be close to the remote strobe, then a high-quality optical hot shoe may suffice. Wired connections are inconvenient at best. The strobe wire and connectors do not hold up so you must have a back up set. This is why I discussed opitcal triggers. Inexpensive radio triggers are a waste of money. Trust me on this. Reliable radio triggers are expensive.

I have no idea what sort of tripod you have for the remote strobe. It is often useful to have a light up high to bounce into the ceiling corner of the room. This avoids odd ceiling colors from light sources with mixed color temperatures. A cheap tall light stand is more useful than a standard tripod. Ther are a variety of small clamps with strobe cold shoe mounts. These can mount a flash atop a door which is another way to bounce light around high up to light ceilings.

You mentioned you prefer natural light. I think an inexpensive, but decent size, white shoot-thru umbrella would be an useful diffuser. Well-placed reflectors are able to increase the impact of a single remote strobe. Thin, white foam-core panels are inexpensive and readily available at home supply and art supply stores. These make great reflectors. You can glue aluminum foil to one side, but I just use the white side for a often light. Cheap plastic clamps are useful to hold the reflectors. To minimize expenses, you can build home made reflector stands out of small diameter plastic plumbing pipe and fittings. If you spray paint these black, clients don't notice they are home made. One of the cheapest ways to create lovely soft light is hanging thin, white, disposable plastic picnic table covers from stands. Just place the strobe behind the stands. If you must tape reflectors to walls or doors, use high-quality painters tape. But taping should be a last resort since there is always a chance for damage when you remove the tape.

A blog called The Stobist is invaluable for anyone interested in inexpensive off-camera lighting.

Good stuff, Willie...thanks! I hadn't thought about the Strobist lately and I like your ideas above.
__________________
Peace, Love and Happiness...



Dave
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2013   #4
dave lackey
Registered User
 
dave lackey's Avatar
 
dave lackey is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 6,727
Update...the X1 and more than proven itself and I will be learning this camera for a long time. I have come to a conclusion that it is a perfect mate to the M3.

Both now have handgrips instead of the halfcase. The X1 has the A&A black strap and VIOOH finder (plus a regular plastic 35mm finder) while the M3 has a Leica MR4 meter.

What I can't do with the X1 with a 35mm pov, I go to the M3 with 50 and 90mm lenses. Got it covered from 35-90mm, color, black and white, macro capability with the X1, beautiful aesthetics and great handling.

The system is set. All fitting in a nice small Billingham bag. Selling and reorganizing stuff is a good thing with a goal in mind

But then there is that pesky GAS...a 135mm lens, a 28 mm lens, film, etc.

__________________
Peace, Love and Happiness...



Dave
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2013   #5
Eric T
Registered User
 
Eric T is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 660
I have been surprised that Leica never expanded the X1/X2 family to include other focal lengths - similar to Sigma's DP1m, DP2m, and DP3m series.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2013   #6
dave lackey
Registered User
 
dave lackey's Avatar
 
dave lackey is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 6,727
Eric, they just did...

It just won't be announced until next week, June 11th.
__________________
Peace, Love and Happiness...



Dave
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2013   #7
robert blu
quiet photographer
 
robert blu's Avatar
 
robert blu is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Italy
Age: 66
Posts: 3,174
Wow Dave, for sure you have a great small system! Sometimes I have in my bag the x1 + m7 with cv 75mm lens. But last week I went another direction, x1 + rolleiflex, notsure yet about the results...
robert
__________________
Remember: today is the Day !
from Ruth Bernhard recipe for a long and happy life


my quiet photographer's blog


My RFF photos and my albums on RFF
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2013   #8
dave lackey
Registered User
 
dave lackey's Avatar
 
dave lackey is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 6,727
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert blu View Post
Wow Dave, for sure you have a great small system! Sometimes I have in my bag the x1 + m7 with cv 75mm lens. But last week I went another direction, x1 + rolleiflex, notsure yet about the results...
robert

Ohh...that sounds good! I am loving 120 lately and can't wait until Wednesday when my last couple of rolls will be processed and scanned.

The Rollie is superb.
__________________
Peace, Love and Happiness...



Dave
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 18:05.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.