Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Coffee With Mentors > Bill Pierce - Leica M photog and author

Bill Pierce - Leica M photog and author

 

ďOur autobiography is written in our contact sheets,  and our opinion of the world in our selectsĒ  

"Never ever confuse sharp with good, or you will end up shaving with an ice cream cone and licking a razor blade."  

 

Bill Pierce is one of the most successful Leica photographers and authors ever. I initially "met" Bill in the wonderful 1973 15th edition Leica Manual (the one with the M5 on the cover). I kept reading and re-reading his four chapters, continually amazed at his knoweldge and ability, thinking "if I only knew a small part of what this guy knows... wow."  I looked foward to his monthly columns in Camera 35 and devoured them like a starving man.  Bill has worked as a photojournalist  for 25 years, keyword: WORK.  Many photogs dream of the professional photographer's  life that Bill has earned and enjoyed.  Probably Bill's most famous pic is Nixon departing the White House for the last time, victory signs still waving. 

 

Bill  has been published in many major magazines, including  Time, Life, Newsweek, U.S. News, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, New York Magazine, Stern, L'Express and Paris Match.  :His published books include  The Leica Manual,  War Torn, Survivors and Victims in the Late 20th Century, Homeless in America,  Human Rights in China,  Children of War.  Add to that numerous exhibitions at major galleries and museums.  Magazine contributions include  Popular Photography,  Camera 35, Leica Manual,  Photo District News, the Encyclopedia of Brittanica, the Digital Journalist, and now RFF.  Major awards include Leica Medal of Excellence, Overseas Press Club's Oliver Rebbot Award for Best Photojournalism from Abroad,  and the World Press Photo's Budapest Award. Perhaps an ever bigger award is Tom Abrahamsson's comment: "If you want to know Rodinal, ask Bill."

 

I met Bill in person through our mutual friend Tom Abrahamsson.  In person his insight and comments are every bit as interesting and engaging as his writing.  He is a great guy who really KNOWS photography.  I am happy to say he has generously agreed to host this forum at RFF  From time to time Bill will bring up topics, but you are also invited to ask questions.  Sit down and enjoy the ride!

 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes

Back Up
Old 10-06-2012   #1
Bill Pierce
Registered User
 
Bill Pierce's Avatar
 
Bill Pierce is offline
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 752
Back Up

If you want to spend Leica dollars without going into the premium priced special editions of their cameras, you can purchase a Leica Monochom for $7950 and the newest of their standard lens, the 50mm, f/2 Summicron for $7195. If the introduction of the latest M with its 24MP CMOS sensor instead of the previous digital Mís CCD sensor casts doubt on the earlier Mís, this newest M Leica will come in at $6,950 in early 2013.

Before you scream about high prices, the Canon EOS 1DX comes in at $6,799 and the Nikon D3X at $6,999. The real difference in price comes when you look at the major manufacturersí lower priced cameras. You can purchase the Canon 6D, a full frame camera introduced at Photokina, for $2,099 or Nikonís D600 for $2099.95 . But the just announced Leica M-E, a slightly stripped version of the CCD M9 is $5,450.

I think that the problem for professional photographers is that they need MULTIPLE BODIES. You should have a back up body to cover you in case of a camera malfunction. In the case of a Leica, which depends primarily on fixed focal-length lenses, you might want two bodies for quick shooting with two lenses. Some professionals who shoot with two rangefinder bodies might be more comfortable in the hinterlands with a third body for back up.

Maybe there is no client outside of himself for a dedicated amateur, but heís not going to be thrilled when a camera goes down and thereís no back up.

Economical back ups are important to most of the photographers who really use their cameras and donít wear them as conspicuous consumption jewelry. What does the digital rangefinder photographer do? I donít want to skew the conversation. Iíve talked about my perspective in other threads, and Iíll post it later if relevant. Whatís important are solutions. Hopefully, you have some because I donít see rangefinders in the hands of the good young photographers that are coming up. And thatís kind of sad.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-06-2012   #2
migtex
Don't eXchange Freedom!
 
migtex's Avatar
 
migtex is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Cartaxo, Portugal
Age: 53
Posts: 772
Probably reminiscent from my PJ times I always try to have two (or three...) bodies. Normally I shoot with two being it RF's or SLR/DSLR's. When traveling light just one and a P/S. There is nothing more painful than "lose" the only camera you carrying.
Young lads are showing up, coming from "lomo" world but it depends on the deep of the their pockets on these hard times... very, very hard times

I know we all know him, but this young photographer is difficult to pass...
__________________
Too many ニコン F's to list... less ニコン D's.... and some ニコン S's and a Bessa R2S NHS!!
My RFF Gallery, My Flickr Gallery, my Olhares.com
Do you Like
Camera FUN? <click>

  Reply With Quote

Old 10-06-2012   #3
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is online now
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 20,584
The trouble is that 'back-up' is a very flexible term. Shooting hard news in the middle of a battle or riot is very different from shooting features or stock in the Himalayas.

In a sense, yes, two identical bodies is the 'gold standard' In another, all you need is a back-up camera that will allow you to get pictures that the client will be happy with. For an extreme example, and many years ago, the Nikon outfit that a friend of mine had taken along for a shoot in Norway want walkies for a week, and he shot 90% of the assignment with a Rollei 35. All the pics the client used were shot with the Rollei...Given how many Leicas I've had fail on me in 30+ years (an M2 in the 1990s), I'm happy enough with an M8 as back-up to an M9, with a film M as a back-up to the back-up.

There's also the point that if you're earning a lot of money with your cameras, then camera prices shouldn't matter much.

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Now even more free photography information on www.rogerandfrances.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-06-2012   #4
giellaleafapmu
Registered User
 
giellaleafapmu is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 808
Problem is that with a Canicon you can get one pro body and you have a huge choice of old models gone cheap and/or new semipro or whatever they are called models which can be used as backups. I am not that young I am not that good and probably I would still have a couple of concerns about using mostly and mainly a rangefinder but maybe if Leica had a middle level camera or if Zeiss or Voigtlander made a digital RF or if Epson updated theirs things could be different. The only solution I see now for a not so expensive second body are adapters on a Nex or a Fuji or the Ricoh module. I still would have some concerns about the lack of a dedicated wireless system, not being able to use long lenses, no shift-tilt lenses...all in all I think that real RF are now deemed to be second systems paired to a jack of all trades DSLR. What people call mirrorless probably will be a different story but their design is still immature, maybe in a few years...

GLF
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=1808'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-06-2012   #5
shimokita
白黒
 
shimokita's Avatar
 
shimokita is offline
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Japan, Tokyo
Posts: 318
I guess we are talking about the amateur (dedicated or otherwise) or a new/semi pro, because with a PRO there is only the one business solution not depending on the system used.

With the former group, it's a trade-off of time, money, convienence... and the solutions are as various as the individuals and shooting situations. Personal networking or "mfg professional services" in some situations...

Regarding your second point of "good young photographers that are coming up"... Yes, the situation vis-a-vis the financial implications of current pricing has caused some shift since the days of film, not to confuse "want" and "need". To be honest I don't worry about the new members that are coming up, those with natural ability or aptitude... and interest will find a way.

Casey
__________________
Canon 5DII, 35 f/1.4L, 85 f/1.2L & 70-200 f/4L
IIIf, Canon 28 f/2.8, 50 f/1.8, & 135 f/3.5
MP, 28 f/2.8 ASPH & 50 f/1.4 ASPH plus CV15 f/4.5
Pentax SPF, SMCT 28 f/3.5, 35 f/3.5, 55 f/1.2, 105 f/2.8 & 135 f/3.5
Nikon F3HP, AI'ed Nikkor-H 28 f/3.5, & Nikkor-P 10.5cm f/2.5
Nikon F3P, AI-S 20 f/2.8, 35 f/1.4, 50 f1.2, & 85 f/1.4
Mamiya RB67, K/L 90 f/3.5 L
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-06-2012   #6
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,905
For some camera are just a cost of doing business. These costs are passed on to clients. It's just like a delivery service buying trucks.

People who photograph primarily for the love of photography are in a completely different situation. Those who with limited disposable income have to make compromises and take chances. These people are not going to own two digital Ms. Two low priced M8s are still at least $4K. So financially constrained photographers who prefer digital media won't be using two M Leicas. The X1 or 2 could serve as a back up for those who will only use Leica products. But this option is certainly a compromise conpared to owning two Ms.

Many digital photographers just keep their old digital body as a back up to their new body. This possibility is often ignored by those who complain digital cameras are undesirable because they depreciate too quickly. Buying a competent non-Leica digital body every three years is not an outrageous expense for many serious amateur photographers.

Right now a used D300 and D200 can be had for about $1K. They are large, heavy and loud compared to an OM5D, Ricoh GR, NEX or X-Pro 1, but they can produce excellent photographs in the right hands. There are many other choices that are equally affordable.

This situation is no different than other (relatively) expensive hobbies. I have been in the paddock of amateur sports car races where one driver would fly in spare parts (a transmission!) overnight via charter plane to make it through a race weekend while others had no choice but to pack up and go home after an expensive component failed.

C'est la vie.
__________________
"Perspective is governed by where you stand Ė object size and the angle of view included in the picture is determined by focal length." H.S. Newcombe

Self-Induced Transparency Photography, FLICKR, Professional Portfolio.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-06-2012   #7
Duane Pandorf
Registered User
 
Duane Pandorf's Avatar
 
Duane Pandorf is offline
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: I'm currently in Brevard, North Carolina.
Posts: 343
Since I'm just a hobbyiest, a second GXR-M with EVF would be enough for me. But then I need to finish my lens kit before I buy a backup.

I would have to agree with the opinion that one who is earning a living shooting better have a backup. The challenge I'd see with an M8 as a backup to a 9 is the sensor crop on the 8 and the FOV your going to have with the lens in your bag.
__________________
Duane Pandorf
--------------------
Blog | Portfolio | FaceBook | Google+ | LHSA Member
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-07-2012   #8
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is online now
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 20,584
Then again, some people do have an overly romantic idea of how much 'pros' earn. Fine art 'pros' in particular often choose to live very simply in order to feed their photographic habit; so do many photojournalists. 'Passing costs on to the clients' may work in high-end advertising, or even in high-end wedding or industrial, but a lot of clients in publishing just don't pay very much to ANYONE.

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Now even more free photography information on www.rogerandfrances.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-07-2012   #9
Pablito
coco frŪo
 
Pablito's Avatar
 
Pablito is offline
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Salsipuedes
Posts: 3,272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
Then again, some people do have an overly romantic idea of how much 'pros' earn. Fine art 'pros' in particular often choose to live very simply..
Yeah, exactly. And I need backup (two identical bodies), and owning TWO digital M cameras is totally out of the question. I can't even afford one.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-07-2012   #10
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 39
Posts: 6,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pablito View Post
Yeah, exactly. And I need backup (two identical bodies), and owning TWO digital M cameras is totally out of the question. I can't even afford one.
Pablito, I am in the same situation. I cannot afford even one used M9, but I have two M6 bodies (and that took a lot of sacrifice to buy, but they still cost less in total than one used M9!).

When I decided to get a digital camera back in January, I got a Canon 5DmkII. I use it for work that isn't urgent enough to require a backup; if it breaks, I have time to get another to finish whatever job I am doing when it breaks. It cost, new, half what a used M9 costs. And it has a warranty, and I know it has not been abused by a previous owner.

Leica has basically told professionals like us to go get f--ked. They make good cameras, but so does Canon and Nikon and several others.
__________________
Christopher Crawford
Fine Art Photography
Fort Wayne, Indiana

Back home again in Indiana

http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

My Technical Info pages: Film Developing times, scanning, printing, editing.

Like My Work on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-07-2012   #11
thegman
Registered User
 
thegman is offline
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Age: 35
Posts: 3,760
I think Chris is right. Leica don't serve the professional market, whether you like it or not, Leica is not in the same business as Canon or Nikon. Leica make beautiful cameras for a discerning buyer, Canon and Nikon make tools for professionals, as well as the consumer market of course.

I'm not a professional, but when I'm away from home, I like to have a backup camera, I don't care about them being identical though, or even the same lens mount. I have the luxury of not taking photographs for a living though.
__________________
My Blog
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-07-2012   #12
Fraser
Registered User
 
Fraser is offline
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Scotland
Posts: 799
When I'm at work I like three bodies and they have to be exactly the same (well they don't have to but its nice) and thats where the expense comes in everyone likes to have the latest model but when you have to buy three at a time suddenly its will these cameras make me more money no, I think I will stick with what I have!
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-07-2012   #13
Dogman
Registered User
 
Dogman is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 323
Although I never was a Boy Scout, the motto "Be Prepared" always appealed to me. When I worked as a news photographer, I had multiple camera bodies and overlapping focal lengths in prime and zoom lenses. Since I had the reputation of occasionally getting my cameras destroyed on assignments, it was a wise decision to have several cameras available as well as an up-to-date personal property insurance policy. I haven't worked as a photographer for over 20 years but I always buy backup camera bodies even today. I don't need the multi-thousand dollar professional models--lower priced "entry level" models or used camera bodies work fine for my needs.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-07-2012   #14
Jamie Pillers
Skeptic
 
Jamie Pillers's Avatar
 
Jamie Pillers is offline
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 3,249
I believe the Fuji X-Pro1 and the X-E1 is a fabulous combination for anyone. It takes just a slight adjustment in behavior to use these cameras. Image quality? I suspect the Fuji images are equal, and possibly better in low light. And the cost? Currently $1700 for the XP1 and $1000 for the X-E1. Using M-mount lenses, especially wide angles, is no problem (zone focusing is best method, and the magnified view method is not bad either). This leave serious money for lenses.
__________________
Talk to a stranger today.

Nikon Df; Nikon 1 V3; Speed Graphic; Polaroid 250
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-07-2012   #15
Jamie Pillers
Skeptic
 
Jamie Pillers's Avatar
 
Jamie Pillers is offline
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 3,249
And another thing... if this professional photographer is working for news organization, I suspect a bag full of Canon G-type, or Sony NEX stuff would serve the needs very well and are easily replaced.
__________________
Talk to a stranger today.

Nikon Df; Nikon 1 V3; Speed Graphic; Polaroid 250
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-08-2012   #16
giellaleafapmu
Registered User
 
giellaleafapmu is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 808
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
I think if we are talking "Pro" in terms of Canon and Nikon, they both have Pro Services, that will make fast work of repairs for pros and provide a loaner body (NPS) while yours is in the shop. Even if I could afford 2 digital M bodies, I would pass just on Leica's past list of problems with their digital gear and the stories of getting these problems fixed in a number of months, not days as in the case of Canon or Nikon.

Two bodies wouldn't cut it, no loaner from Leica so.. maybe 3.. or 4? Big money. How about a spare S2 body. I see David Harvey is using an S2 currently. I'll bet he doesn't have a spare S2, maybe a couple M9 back-ups?

I guess Fuji might be an option ?
I think all are right in this thread but don't forget that there are pro, semi-pro, occasional pro which don't live in the first world. I am one of those and if a camera breaks I have to go the painful route of international shipping with either the risk of never seeing my camera again or the duty of declaring values and use couriers which imply also paying taxes (yep, on my own stuff sometimes!). Life is not always simple.
In this of course Canicon once again have the advantage of having service points in most places and also to be very popular meaning spare parts are available easily, Leica...well forget about it. As for clients paying the costs of camera, that's truly a possibility but when you produce two indistinguishable images, one using a 2,000 US$ combo and the other using a 10,000 US$ combo, assuming you could really charge the 10,000 US$ combo costs to the client, it still means that you get 8,000 US$ more in your pocket if you use the cheaper one. Also, my experience (not uncommon if I have to believe many of the posts here) is that many people paying for photographs have absolutely no idea of the technology behind and might even like the fact that you show up at the session with a large "Pro" body, and when that body stays on a tripod tethered to a computer all the time any size advantage of a Leica is meaningless anyway. Indeed we are talking two completely different markets here and my guess is that most Pros fall into Canicon market.

GLF
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=1808'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-08-2012   #17
icebear
Registered User
 
icebear's Avatar
 
icebear is offline
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: just west of the big apple
Posts: 2,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
....
Leica has basically told professionals like us to go get f--ked. They make good cameras, but so does Canon and Nikon and several others.
Sorry, Chris but this statement is some of the brown soft stuff that comes from the cattle's behind .
If you care about your artistic ability to express yourself, does it depend on some small scale camera manufacturer that simply can't meet other big guy's price calculations?
If you are a RFF kind of guy and a Leica M guy for that matter, than just continue to use your two M6s. Going Leica M digital has implication on the workflow but not on your ability to earn your money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
....
Two bodies wouldn't cut it, no loaner from Leica so.. maybe 3.. or 4? Big money. How about a spare S2 body. I see David Harvey is using an S2 currently. I'll bet he doesn't have a spare S2, maybe a couple M9 back-ups?

I guess Fuji might be an option ?
There is Leica Pro service with significant better turnaround times and Kristian got an M9 loaner when he had issues with his other digital body. I'm not sure if he is special and he was an exception but from where do you get the "no loaner" policy statement?
__________________
Klaus
You have to be there !
M3, M6, MP , M9, MM & a bunch of glass

my gallery:http://www.rangefinderforum.com/rffg...d=6650&showall
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-08-2012   #18
NaChase
Registered User
 
NaChase's Avatar
 
NaChase is offline
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Sackets Harbor, NY
Age: 26
Posts: 352
I wouldn't call myself an "up and comer" by any sense, but I am young (at least relatively). I believe in having a backup, which is why I shoot and M6 and M3 and a Nikon F2S and F2AS. For all intents and purposes the cameras are identical and I typically have either the same film or one black and white and one color in each of the two cameras I carry on me while out shooting. I certainly do not have a lot of money, but I scrounge for deals and wait for the right camera to come around.
__________________
Nick

RF Cameras: Leica M3DS, Leica M6, Nikon S2, Minolta Hi-Matic 7, Mamiya 7II, Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic
RF Lenses:
90mm Elmarit, 75 Summilux, 5cm Summicron, 50mm DR Summicron, 50mm Nikon Millennium f/1.4, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon, Mamiya 80mm f/4, Mamiya 150mm f/4.5


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33155788@N07/
http://www.flickr.com/groups/film_is...ong_live_film/
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-08-2012   #19
Godfrey
wonderment
 
Godfrey's Avatar
 
Godfrey is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,054
If I'm a pro being paid for a shoot, I want a backup. If I can't afford a second M body, I rent one and charge as part of my equipment use fees. Or I use a different and less expensive camera as the backup.

As an amateur/hobbyist, I've never seen the necessity of carrying a camera as backup. The only things I'm dealing with as an amateur are self-imposed, and if I can afford two bodies to make my shooting more convenient, and provide backup, fine: just buy them and use as apropos. Otherwise, if the camera fails in the field, well, I just don't take more photos that day. Life sucks, you move on and plan the next outing, otherwise enjoy the day.

Of course I have plenty of backup anyway ... in different cameras ... if I feel compelled that I have to shoot every day even if my main camera went down. I can always stuff an older Leica film body into the bag with a couple of rolls of film as backup. My CL body cost me $350, which makes it an easy, inexpensive backup to the M9 if I so choose to perceive it that way.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-08-2012   #20
icebear
Registered User
 
icebear's Avatar
 
icebear is offline
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: just west of the big apple
Posts: 2,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
...

I can always stuff an older Leica film body into the bag with a couple of rolls of film as backup. My CL body cost me $350, which makes it an easy, inexpensive backup to the M9 if I so choose to perceive it that way.
Great example of flexibilty to prevent to get in one's own way . Some seem to be as flexible as a rock.
__________________
Klaus
You have to be there !
M3, M6, MP , M9, MM & a bunch of glass

my gallery:http://www.rangefinderforum.com/rffg...d=6650&showall
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-08-2012   #21
lonemantis
Registered User
 
lonemantis is offline
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 108
I work semi-professionally, in that most of my shooting is amateur but I take paid gigs enough that I cover the cost of my gear and make a bit of income. I'll always bring a backup camera, but I like the idea of my backup having different abilities that compliment my main shooter.

For example, I recently made the jump to M4/3 and my main camera for work is an OM-D with a set of zooms and primes. I do a lot of cinematography work for films as well, so I decided to get a GH2 as a backup and primary video camera, due to better video quality. It's also great for shooting two primes simultaneously without having to switch, because M4/3 has such an awesome selection of primes.

If either camera were to fail though, I feel like the other would be capable enough to finish the job adequately. If things go really pear-shaped though, I like to keep an E-PM1 stashed away as well just for peace of mind!
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-08-2012   #22
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 39
Posts: 6,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by icebear View Post
Sorry, Chris but this statement is some of the brown soft stuff that comes from the cattle's behind .
If you care about your artistic ability to express yourself, does it depend on some small scale camera manufacturer that simply can't meet other big guy's price calculations?
If you are a RFF kind of guy and a Leica M guy for that matter, than just continue to use your two M6s. Going Leica M digital has implication on the workflow but not on your ability to earn your money.
I stand by what I said. I'm a professional, you are not. You have no clue what you're talking about. I do. See, actually BEING a professional means that I, not you, know what support professionals need from the manufacturers of our equipment, and what manufacturers are willing to give us that support. Leica doesn't give a f--k about professionals. Sorry, buddy. Its the facts. Every professional in this thread has said the same thing I did, for the same reasons.
__________________
Christopher Crawford
Fine Art Photography
Fort Wayne, Indiana

Back home again in Indiana

http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

My Technical Info pages: Film Developing times, scanning, printing, editing.

Like My Work on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-08-2012   #23
icebear
Registered User
 
icebear's Avatar
 
icebear is offline
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: just west of the big apple
Posts: 2,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
I stand by what I said. I'm a professional, you are not. You have no clue what you're talking about. I do. See, actually BEING a professional means that I, not you, know what support professionals need from the manufacturers of our equipment, and what manufacturers are willing to give us that support. Leica doesn't give a f--k about professionals. Sorry, buddy. Its the facts. Every professional in this thread has said the same thing I did, for the same reasons.
LOL, real man shoot film. You are right and know the facts.
I have no clue and enjoy my M9 .
__________________
Klaus
You have to be there !
M3, M6, MP , M9, MM & a bunch of glass

my gallery:http://www.rangefinderforum.com/rffg...d=6650&showall
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-09-2012   #24
Duane Pandorf
Registered User
 
Duane Pandorf's Avatar
 
Duane Pandorf is offline
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: I'm currently in Brevard, North Carolina.
Posts: 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
M9 Memory problems still not solved?

This is the reason I wouldn't trust a digital Leica in a professional setting.

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...hreadid=124853
I think you may not have read through the entire thread as the last entry from the OP says that he would delete files individually and occasionally had turned off the camera while it was still processing.

Wouldn't be any different than opening the back of your film camera before finishing the roll.

I believe the new M will handle these chores a little quicker than the 9.
__________________
Duane Pandorf
--------------------
Blog | Portfolio | FaceBook | Google+ | LHSA Member
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-09-2012   #25
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 39
Posts: 6,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by icebear View Post
LOL, real man shoot film.
It is a joke, you fool.


Quote:
Originally Posted by icebear View Post
You are right and know the facts.
I have no clue and enjoy my M9 .
Nope, you don't have a clue. When you start getting published, exhibited, being paid..THEN, and only then, can you tell professionals how professionals work. Until them, try shutting your mouth and listening. You might even learn something.
__________________
Christopher Crawford
Fine Art Photography
Fort Wayne, Indiana

Back home again in Indiana

http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

My Technical Info pages: Film Developing times, scanning, printing, editing.

Like My Work on Facebook
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 13:33.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.