Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Photography General Interest

Photography General Interest Neat Photo stuff NOT particularly about Rangefinders.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Old 10-13-2011   #81
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 22,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulfish4570 View Post
i turned 60 in may and i finally have ambition ...
Dear Paul,

As the old formula has it, "God bless you and keep you."

Love,

R.
__________________
Go to www.rogerandfrances.eu for a whole new website
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2011   #82
paulfish4570
Registered User
 
paulfish4570's Avatar
 
paulfish4570 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Lapine, in deep south Alabama
Age: 65
Posts: 10,175
retirement opens all sorts of ambition doors. i like the one marked "photography."
__________________
Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind ...
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2011   #83
zauhar
Registered User
 
zauhar's Avatar
 
zauhar is offline
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 2,090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
Dear Randy

Well, quite. But put it another way: as you get older, your priorities may change. Not to the extent of abandoning ambitions, but to the extent of changing them.

Which relates to the point that your career choices affect your ambitions. My brother's ambitions (at ten) to become an admiral were greatly restricted by his decision not to join the navy...
That said, if I moved closer it may have ruined it anyway .
Cheers,

R.
That gave me a laugh, thanks Roger!

If I am ever in your neck of the woods I hope you will let me take a peek at the castle you you mentioned - I'll buy afterward.


Randy
__________________
Philadelphia, PA
Leica M3/50mm DR Summicron/21mm SuperAngulon/
90mm Elmarit
Canon 7/50mm f1.4
Leica IIIf/Summitar/Collapsible Summicron
Yashica Electro 35
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-15-2011   #84
charjohncarter
Registered User
 
charjohncarter's Avatar
 
charjohncarter is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Danville, CA, USA
Posts: 7,295
Quote:
Originally Posted by redisburning View Post
I don't think aesthetics can improve.

This statement really worries me. Mostly, because I think you might be right. Example, Paul McCartney: he was a very innovative song smith in the early 60s but I'm not sure later. This disturbing fact (if it is true) would also include Bobby Zimmerman (Dylan), maybe Albert Einstein, Latrique (possibly misspelled), Watson and Crick (if they were even to one that came up with the double helix for DNA, some say it was a female graduate student), Margret whatever that wrote 'Gone With The Wind,' and many more. The only exception I can think about is Chet Atkins that improved and innovated over his whole life. Chet gets to subtract a few years because of brain cancer.

But we are all selfish so I want to think that I can still be innovative.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-16-2011   #85
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 22,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by zauhar View Post
That gave me a laugh, thanks Roger!

If I am ever in your neck of the woods I hope you will let me take a peek at the castle you you mentioned - I'll buy afterward.


Randy
Dear Randy,

The castle in the back yard (well, visible from the back yard, anyway), was built about 1020 AD by (or rather for) Fulk de Nerra (spellings of his name vary -- I don't know whether he could read and write). You need a strong imagination to get much out of it. The donjon (the big square bit that goes up a long way) has been well restored on the outside, but on the inside, it's just a huge empty space all the way to the roof, with a staircase in one corner. there's quite a view from the top.

The Forteresse de Berrie, an hour or so away, is much more interesting. The first time I saw it, I'd not met the owner, but just wandered around inside anyway. Later, when I met him, I found that he'd bought it just for the attached vineyard, where he makes some off the finest dessert wines in the world.

In the next village there's the Abbatiale Church of St. Jouin de Marnes, widely regarded as one of the best examples of XIII century Gothic in the world, but it's hard to photograph: take a look at http://www.art-roman.net/stjouin/stjouin.htm.

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Go to www.rogerandfrances.eu for a whole new website
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-13-2012   #86
mdarnton
Registered User
 
mdarnton is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,150
There is no reason that personal photographs cannot be quality photos, with an "art" component to them, and no reason to stop before that happens, IF one cares. Many people don't care--I understand that, and it depends on what your goals are. But "taking family photos" is not a reason that prevents one from taking good photos according to more general standards. One of the most common feelings I get going through online portfolios is "why did this person think other people would want to see this crap?"

Many artists have drawn their subject matter directly from their intimate surroundings and daily lives. A common subject shouldn't necessarily or inevitably result in common photos.
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-13-2012   #87
Bob Michaels
nobody special
 
Bob Michaels's Avatar
 
Bob Michaels is offline
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Apopka FL (USA)
Age: 73
Posts: 3,352
Quote:
Originally Posted by back alley View Post
......................... i propose we start talking more about how we can improve our skills. just HOW that would look i have to leave for the smart ones out there in rf land. ...........................
Sorry I am arriving at the party so late. Possibly it has already ended. My 2 cents FWIW:

1) stop devoting any time and/or energy to worrying about lenses, cameras, developers, ect. They are so much better than we are that there is minimal area for improvement.

2) spend 100% of your time and energy worrying about what you photograph and the decisive moment you press the shutter. This is the fertile area that is ripe for unlimited improvement.

3) have some idea what message you want you photographs to convey. Then rapidly and critically edit what you have done. Focus on how well it delivers your message, not how much time and effort you put into it. Learn to set aside your emotions from the moment and focus only on what the photograph tells the viewer. Don't confuse the most interesting person you ever met with an ordinary photo of the same that conveys none of that feeling.

4) take chances! Realize no one cares is you shot 1,000 or 10,000 pretty good photos last year. No one cares if you edit out 98% of what you shoot. All that matters is the top 10 or 20 photos you shoot each year. Accept there are only two classes of photos: really great ones and everything else.
__________________
http://www.bobmichaels.org
internet forums appear to have an abundance of anonymous midgets prancing on stilts
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-13-2012   #88
Juan Valdenebro
Truth is beauty
 
Juan Valdenebro's Avatar
 
Juan Valdenebro is offline
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Barcelona and Colombia
Age: 44
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Michaels View Post
Learn to set aside your emotions from the moment and focus only on what the photograph tells the viewer.
Cool, Bob. That's it.

Cheers,

Juan
__________________
F i l m means fun!
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2012   #89
daveleo
È quello che è.
 
daveleo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: People's Republic of Mass.
Posts: 3,544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Michaels View Post
Sorry I am arriving at the party so late. Possibly it has already ended. My 2 cents FWIW:

1) stop devoting any time and/or energy to worrying about lenses, cameras, developers, ect. They are so much better than we are that there is minimal area for improvement.

2) spend 100% of your time and energy worrying about what you photograph and the decisive moment you press the shutter. This is the fertile area that is ripe for unlimited improvement.

3) have some idea what message you want you photographs to convey. Then rapidly and critically edit what you have done. Focus on how well it delivers your message, not how much time and effort you put into it. Learn to set aside your emotions from the moment and focus only on what the photograph tells the viewer. Don't confuse the most interesting person you ever met with an ordinary photo of the same that conveys none of that feeling.

4) take chances! Realize no one cares is you shot 1,000 or 10,000 pretty good photos last year. No one cares if you edit out 98% of what you shoot. All that matters is the top 10 or 20 photos you shoot each year. Accept there are only two classes of photos: really great ones and everything else.
I was going to add my thoughts, but this posting outdid anything I could write.
Let me simply add . . .

I will study a set of similar images I've made and endlessly question myself why this one is "better" than that one (though they are all very similar). This process helps me to understand what feelings I hope this particular scene impresses on the viewer. Often I learn that what I am really after is not exactly what was on my mind when I shot the image.
__________________
Dave


"I photograph my fantasies" .... Man Ray
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2012   #90
Damaso
Photojournalist
 
Damaso's Avatar
 
Damaso is offline
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,012
A great idea! The first piece of advice I give my students is "when you're shooting think about what you are photographing, why you are photographing it and what you're trying to communicate." When looking at the photograph you produce compare it to what you had in your mind and see if the two line up...
__________________
Damaso

My Blog
Personal Instruction
In Photography


M8
M6TTL .58
M6TTL .85
50mm Summilux Pre-Asph
90mm Summarit
Ultron 35 f1.7
VC 75 f2.5
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2012   #91
anjoca76
Registered User
 
anjoca76's Avatar
 
anjoca76 is offline
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 612
This is such a terrific thread. I'm not sure how I overlooked it before today.

Earlier is was mentioned that a common problem is not getting close enough to one's subject. I am frequently guilty of that. I started off using a 50mm lens most of the time, then went to a 40, and lately I find myself sticking with a 21. I tend to shoot a lot of architecture and in tight city streets, so the 21 makes sense for me, but I also wonder if it isn't a convenient crutch. I'm not a shy person by nature, but I also can't imagine walking up to people in a city like Boston, which doesn't always have the most friendly folks, and engaging them that closely with my camera. It doesn't help that I prefer mostly manual cameras and eschew anything with automatic exposure/focus.

Anyone have any suggestions? This week I plan to dust off my 90mm and take some portraits of friends and family, which I realize is not the same as getting out there in a more public space and stepping up to subjects, nor the same "genre" of photography even, but it does feel at least like somewhat of a start. Or I am off base?
__________________
Andy

Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2012   #92
mdarnton
Registered User
 
mdarnton is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,150
I've been looking at the photos of everyone who's posted here who has something accessible. From that, and from what goes on in my mind when I'm taking pictures, here's what I think/do before I press the button, that I think other people should also do, no matter what style of photography they're doing:

1/ That's a great setup but is it just a cheap visual pun or cliche? If it is, skip it--don't get too invested in your own cleverness.

2/ Will anyone else find anything in this picture, or does it depend too much on having been there, either physically or more importantly, emotionally? (Not a big one if other good-photo rules get followed, as always--hopefully these just get edited out later when you can't remember why you shot them or don't think anyone else would care; but too many Flickr pages are filled with 20 almost-identical pix of your kid or your dog or your cat, etc. where one, or better yet, none, would have been enough).

3/ Is there a better place to stand to pack it all closer together so that it makes a stronger point? Notice that movies are almost always shot with people standing much closer than they would be in real life--that makes everything clearer and more intense. While you're at it, is there some way to clean up that background full of irrelevant clutter?

4/ How much closer can I stand before important things get cut off? One of my students told me once that a previous teacher had said frame the shot, and then take one big step closer, and that's not a bad idea. Just putting something off center to put it off center does not a great photo make; it needs a reason to be off center, or it's just a waste of good space. It's especially irritating if there's too much space in one place, yet something important has been cut off elsewhere (one person's Flickr stuff here has that problem way too much). Frame so that it would be impossible for someone to come along later and crop your picture without ruining it.

5/ For god's sake, try to keep your camera level. If that's not what you want, tilt it more to make that totally clear.

6/ "Pretty" is not enough reason. Not ever.

7/ Try to develop a style. This guy got hammered by the critics not because of his skill, but because (due to his family history) he was being exhibited while he still didn't know what style of painter he was, so each painting looked like it was done by a different person.

For myself, I've come to realize that I don't like pictures that objectify people. I never really understood what women meant when they said they felt objectified, until I thought about it in my photos. At this point, I don't believe in using people as props, then. That pretty much limits me to people I know, or at least have met and know something about. The best thing about being a newspaper photographer was having the excuse to walk up to people whose picture I wanted to take and introduce myself, talk to them about what they were doing, and then make some sort of photo that communicated something about who they were and what they were doing. It gave me a constant flow of subjects, people to meet, know something about, and then, finally, photograph in a way that was personal and relevant to that individual. Consequently, "street" photography has never held the slightest amount of interest for me, not doing it, nor looking at it. Far too many street photos violate point one, above, and often the others, too. I'm a big HCB fan, but mostly of his portraits. Notice that when he quit, it was portraits that he kept doing.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2012   #93
ISO
Registered User
 
ISO's Avatar
 
ISO is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: London
Posts: 154
Henry Cartier-Bresson was asked: "Can one learn to look?"...his first answer: "Can one learn to have sex?"

Henry Cartier-Bresson: Learn to see ..........find the legend yourself....
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-30-2012   #94
raha777
Registered User
 
raha777 is offline
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 10
just a question .. how to use iso ranges in digital cameras , and how to adjust them / how could they impact proffessional photography. thanks in advance
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-30-2012   #95
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 41
Posts: 7,435
Quote:
Originally Posted by raha777 View Post
just a question .. how to use iso ranges in digital cameras , and how to adjust them / how could they impact proffessional photography. thanks in advance
Its like choosing what speed film to shoot. Lower ISO settings give the best quality. Higher ISOs give more noise and a smaller dynamic range, but they allow shooting handheld in low light. I shoot with a 5DmkII when I shoot digital. Its base ISO is 100. I use that anytime I use a tripod, even in dim light, because of the higher image quality. If I'm shooting handheld, I'll often use 400. I've used the 1600 and 3200 ISO settings in dim light where I was shooting handheld, but the image quality is far lower at those high settings: lots of noise, less detail, and less dynamic range.
__________________
Christopher Crawford
Fine Art Photography
Fort Wayne, Indiana

Back home again in Indiana

http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

My Technical Info pages: Film Developing times, scanning, printing, editing.

Buy My Prints in RFF Classifieds

Support My Work on Patreon
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-16-2012   #96
Ariefb
Registered User
 
Ariefb's Avatar
 
Ariefb is offline
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Indonesia
Posts: 79
This is exactly the thread that i need. i think it's time to relived the discussion once more.
Another photographer taught me to pay attention to composition, edges, corner, spaces, straightness, horizon & vertical elements in a shot. That one advice really improved my photography.
__________________
Make Film, Not War.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-20-2012   #97
Damaso
Photojournalist
 
Damaso's Avatar
 
Damaso is offline
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,012
So after 100 posts does anyone feel like their photography has improved?
__________________
Damaso

My Blog
Personal Instruction
In Photography


M8
M6TTL .58
M6TTL .85
50mm Summilux Pre-Asph
90mm Summarit
Ultron 35 f1.7
VC 75 f2.5
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-20-2012   #98
charjohncarter
Registered User
 
charjohncarter's Avatar
 
charjohncarter is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Danville, CA, USA
Posts: 7,295
If anything I'm getting worse.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-28-2013   #99
alexsoch
alexsoch
 
alexsoch's Avatar
 
alexsoch is offline
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: France, Poland
Posts: 17
It's a great idea to talk about improvement, about growing. Of course, it depends on your ambitions, why you want grow?... To make a better picture then somebody else, to 'beat' someone, or just to express yourself in the best way with rf camera, of course ? I think, the best tutorial is to start to know yourself.
Duane Michals, one of my favourite photographers talks about it very well:


'You must find your real thing,
you must find your passion, your must find your fear,
it's not outside, its not in Africa, its not in somebody else,
it's in you.'
Duane Michals
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-28-2013   #100
back alley
IMAGES
 
back alley's Avatar
 
back alley is offline
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: true north strong & free
Posts: 39,979
knowing oneself is the key to all greatness...that's why it's so hard to know yourself...
__________________
heart soul & a camera

xe2...xe1...16...23...56...55-200

original canon F1...T90...24/2.8...100/2.8...200/2.8...300/5.6
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-28-2013   #101
--s
-
 
--s is offline
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexsoch View Post
It's a great idea to talk about improvement, about growing. Of course, it depends on your ambitions, why you want grow?... To make a better picture then somebody else, to 'beat' someone, or just to express yourself in the best way with rf camera, of course ? I think, the best tutorial is to start to know yourself.
Duane Michals, one of my favourite photographers talks about it very well:


'You must find your real thing,
you must find your passion, your must find your fear,
it's not outside, its not in Africa, its not in somebody else,
it's in you.'
Duane Michals
thank you, that´s a wonderful quote. i wonder why so many people here seem to be so unhappy with their images.....
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-09-2013   #102
Cyriljay
Registered User
 
Cyriljay's Avatar
 
Cyriljay is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: London
Posts: 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddoc View Post
If you want to change your photographs, you need to change cameras. Changing cameras means that your photographs will change. A really good camera has something I suppose you might describe as its own distinctive aura. – Nobuyoshi Araki

I like that concept.
This is superb got lot of meaning and sense
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-09-2013   #103
Mr. Fizzlesticks
Registered User
 
Mr. Fizzlesticks is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 22
You can slap a coat of paint on a zebra but it ain't gonna win the Kentucky Derby.
__________________


It is not the camera in your hand dingleberry; it is the brain in your head.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-11-2013   #104
sreed2006
Registered User
 
sreed2006's Avatar
 
sreed2006 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Dallas, TX, USA
Posts: 810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Fizzlesticks View Post
You can slap a coat of paint on a zebra but it ain't gonna win the Kentucky Derby.
No, but if you lit his butt on fire I bet it would win. I've seen zebras run. I wouldn't want to be in their way.
__________________
Sid

My favorite question is "What does this button do?"
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-11-2013   #105
Photo_Smith
Registered User
 
Photo_Smith's Avatar
 
Photo_Smith is offline
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,483
Sometimes I find the emotional feeling that made me take images evaporates by the time I process them For instance recently i got to drive a steam train, I took pictures on the footplate none of them do more than record the moment.
The images are OK but just for me really, not art and doesn't have to be.

I think leaving a week or two between taking and developing helps me sort the wheat from the chaff, but sometimes a photo has something of you or your life in it, probably shouldn't be shared.

One such image is this one from my holiday where my children collected flowers that has fell from a shrub, the air was warm and the children put the flowers in a dish which I took with the last light of a lovely summer day, emotive to me but a so so image to the rest of humanity.

flowers by Photo Utopia, on Flickr

Probably shouldn't be shown...
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-11-2013   #106
squareshooter
-
 
squareshooter is offline
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 226
A lot of folks need to forget what they think is cool, and what they think makes them look cool when they carry it, and forget the trends and "instant truths" of the moment. They need to look at good photography from the distant past to the present and decide for themselves what is good and why. When I was a noobie in the 1950s, I had all these hangups. Gear changes but people don't-- not much, anyway. I owned two Leicas but had them because they did the job for me at the time. I now own more than 50 film cameras and no Leicas. I am sort of looking around for a Nicca, however.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-11-2013   #107
Ko.Fe.
Me. Write ESL. Ko.
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Age: 50
Posts: 3,698
Quote:
Originally Posted by squareshooter View Post
A lot of folks need to forget what they think is cool, and what they think makes them look cool when they carry it, and forget the trends and "instant truths" of the moment. They need to look at good photography from the distant past to the present and decide for themselves what is good and why. When I was a noobie in the 1950s, I had all these hangups. Gear changes but people don't-- not much, anyway. I owned two Leicas but had them because they did the job for me at the time. I now own more than 50 film cameras and no Leicas. I am sort of looking around for a Nicca, however.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teuthida View Post
1: avoid the picturesque, always.
2: never try to emulate someone else
3: be selective in what you show others
4: develop a style YOU like and ignore others criticisms
5: never, ever, equate sharp with good.
6: forget your gear.
The best, both.

And 6 is timeless these days and seems to be more difficult.
XA and R are all I need, but can't stop thinking about older M.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-11-2013   #108
Murchu
Registered User
 
Murchu is offline
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ireland
Age: 37
Posts: 829
Quote:
Originally Posted by back alley View Post
i propose we start talking more about how we can improve our skills.
In my opinion, a big start for a lot of photographers seeking improvement would be honesty. Honesty about what is actually holding them back, as I suspect they already know, and honesty about whether they actually wish to improve and do what it takes. Photography should be no different than any other subject in which one wishes to improve at, however most people simply do not want to do what it takes to improve, in my opinion.
__________________
Damien

http://500px.com/Murchu
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-12-2013   #109
cat man
Registered User
 
cat man's Avatar
 
cat man is offline
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sreed2006 View Post
No, but if you lit his butt on fire I bet it would win. I've seen zebras run. I wouldn't want to be in their way.
Sid. Have you been setting fire to zebras again?
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-12-2013   #110
DougK
This space left blank
 
DougK's Avatar
 
DougK is offline
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Westlake, OH
Age: 46
Posts: 1,528
I shoot a lot of landscapes, scenics, and still ilfe shots and after a while they all started to look the same: technically sound but pretty much boring and meaningless. After a goodly long while of wandering around with a camera and framing a lot of photos without pressing the shutter release, I started asking myself "What is it about <subject> that makes me want to photograph it?" Now I try to make the photo answer that question. My photos are getting more abstract and it's definitely more difficult than taking a pretty postcard shot, but I like the direction I'm going and I'm having much more fun.
__________________
Doug K.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-12-2013   #111
squareshooter
-
 
squareshooter is offline
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 226
The name of the game is to be able to get the kind of image you are looking to get. If one can pick up a great tip on how to do so from another shooter, well that is great. One person's "high fashion" is overexposed nonsense to another. So be it. But are you getting the picture exactly as you want it or are you settling for auto-exposure, auto-focus, auto-decisivemement?
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-25-2013   #112
sreed2006
Registered User
 
sreed2006's Avatar
 
sreed2006 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Dallas, TX, USA
Posts: 810
Quote:
Originally Posted by cat man View Post
Sid. Have you been setting fire to zebras again?
Oh oh. I started the Inquisition on RFF.

I have only sat a cat's tail on fire. That was years ago. Luckily, it wasn't hurt and I didn't get caught.

But I remembered the Richard Pryor skit after he was burned while freebasing cocaine. He said they should introduce fire into the Olympics because man do you run fast when you are on fire. I would imagine a zebra would too.

Morale of the story? If your photography is not improving, put more fire into it.
__________________
Sid

My favorite question is "What does this button do?"
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-12-2014   #113
biomed
Registered User
 
biomed's Avatar
 
biomed is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Seattle Area (North)
Posts: 3,349
__________________
biomed
Things are more like they are now than they’ve ever been before.

2016 Photos

rff Gallery

Blog
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-10-2014   #114
John E Earley
Tuol Sleng S21-0174
 
John E Earley's Avatar
 
John E Earley is offline
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Virginia
Age: 69
Posts: 1,954
A very interesting thread that seems to have gone dormant.
__________________
Creation stands with neck outstreached....
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 20:06.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.