Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > 35mm Film Range Finders > Canon RF

Canon RF For classic Leica Screw Mount Canon Rangefinders.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes

New IVsb2 -- to trigger wind or not?
Old 1 Week Ago   #1
Spicy
Registered User
 
Spicy is offline
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: back in Seoul
Age: 27
Posts: 584
New IVsb2 -- to trigger wind or not?

Hey all. Ended up succumbing to lust of the adjustable-mag finders of the earlier bottom-load Canon LTMs bodies. Got one off evilBay and it arrived a little while ago. Haven't had a chance to finish the test-roll yet as the weather's been hot/rainy, but there's film in the camera. Cosmetically it's in good shape, finder as well; 1/15 and 1/8th are slow and sticky, and anything slower gets stuck. A CLA is in order in the future, but for the time being, the slow speeds shouldn't be too hard to avoid in everyday use...

Anyways, I was curious about people's experience with the rapid-winder? I've never been particularly interested in them, but the body I bought came with one on it. I figured I would just look into selling it or otherwise swapping it out for a normal baseplate, as one of the things I really love about my IIIc is how tiny/lightweight it is despite the high-quality feel.

Having shot only half a roll, I will concede that it makes for a big difference in the shooting experience. I'd say that they would be sort of silly on a camera with the more modern thumb-lever advance, but on the knob-wind bodies, it does tend to speed things up *a LOT*. The cost of that is a significantly taller body, and I would guess a pretty sizable weight penalty...

Anyone care to weigh in? Either converts to trigger-winders or people similar to (I think) me who prefer the lighter weight and smaller size of the normally-equipped bodies?




edit: in short, to be clear, i was curious about them (rapid-winders) but not particularly interested before buying the IVsb2. having used the camera with it, it is quite the novelty, and the engineering is impressive. that being said, i think my gut feeling hasn't changed, and that i value and prefer the small size/lightweight purity of a normal Barnack. i'm open-minded, though, and will continue to use it for at least a few rolls in order to give it a chance...
__________________
ID7P0M2F854Ior+50PdV3MSFcC05MNC00
[:] [']
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #2
Brian Legge
Registered User
 
Brian Legge is offline
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 2,220
I had one briefly but ended up sending the body and winder back to the seller due to shutter speed problems. I loved the idea, but when I stepped back and thought about how I used bottom loaders, I realized I valued them for their small size. If the size was irrelevant, I'd use an M. Trigger winders help when shooting fast.. but I don't. I'm slow, particularly with film.

In hindsight, the defect was probably a blessing in disguise for me. But thats the key bit 'for me'. Your values and how you use the camera may be totally different than how I used these bodies. The trigger winder does the job well (and adds an interesting weight/balance to the camera). If it works well for you, definitely run with it!
__________________
Shooting whatever I can get my hands on.
Recent Work
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #3
Mackinaw
Think Different
 
Mackinaw is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
Posts: 2,074
I have one, that I, at times, put on my Canon III-A. I like it. While it does make the camera bulkier, no doubt it greatly speeds up the film advance process. And honestly, the added bulk doesn't bother me.

My problem isn't with the camera/winder combo, but with the III-A's viewfinder. It's of the "squinty" variety, making viewing and focusing a pain. I'm spoiled by my M-series Leicas' so that's what I normally shoot with. So the III-A and winder mostly sit in my cabinet.

Jim B.
__________________
My fancy-schmancy gallery:

http://snowcountryphotography.com

My RFF Gallery:

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/phot...user=1453&sl=m
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #4
Dez
Bodger Extraordinaire
 
Dez's Avatar
 
Dez is offline
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
Posts: 1,161
Who on the list REALLY uses an old RF camera for its practicality?

Me, if I need to take a lot of pictures quickly, I use my DSLR.

Heretically,
Dez
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #5
Spicy
Registered User
 
Spicy is offline
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: back in Seoul
Age: 27
Posts: 584
i was just curious about what people thought of the weight/size penalty vs handling improvement... are the rapid winders worth selling/is it possible to buy a plain bottom plate? i poked around on evilBay but couldn't find either that wasn't attached to a body, lol.
__________________
ID7P0M2F854Ior+50PdV3MSFcC05MNC00
[:] [']
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #6
Tom A
RFF Sponsor
 
Tom A's Avatar
 
Tom A is offline
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Age: 71
Posts: 5,591
The Rapidwinders are mainly used for faster shooting - and also for holding the camera steady. This is particularly important with a camera like the Canon IV as you have to drop the camera to get to the advance knob.
For cameras with a lever rewind (m and similar) - the Rapidwinder eliminates having the advance lever poking you in the eye if you are a left eye shooter.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #7
mike rosenlof
Insufficient information
 
mike rosenlof is offline
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Colorado
Posts: 171
I have a bottom load Canon and a Leotax. I am never in a hurry when using these cameras, so have never felt a need for a trigger winder. I go for smaller size lenses with these bodies also.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #8
FrankS
Registered User
 
FrankS is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Canada, eh.
Age: 57
Posts: 17,475
I wouldn't go out of my way to acquire a trigger winder for a screw mourn RF, but since your camera came with one, go ahead and use it. If you find that it makes the camera too big or heavy for you, then try to find a normal baseplate and sell off the winder. It's you and your camera, who cares what anyone else would do. Decide for yourself based on your own experience.
__________________
my little website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #9
Spicy
Registered User
 
Spicy is offline
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: back in Seoul
Age: 27
Posts: 584
haha, thanks for the input everyone -- yeah, I wasn't asking "what should I do?" but rather for other's experiences, like if someone also wasn't looking for a rapid-winder-equipped camera, but after using it for 1-2 months decided it was a pleasant change or something like that.

looks like I'll probably look into selling it for a normal baseplate, though not in much of a hurry. does anyone know what the current market value would roughly be for *just* a Canon rapid-winder? I seem to be having difficulty wording an evilBay search correctly to yield results for the Canon one (Leicavits are plentiful).
__________________
ID7P0M2F854Ior+50PdV3MSFcC05MNC00
[:] [']
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #10
peterm1
Registered User
 
peterm1's Avatar
 
peterm1 is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 3,257
I kind of enjoy the zen like experience of winding on an old LTM type camera, whether its a Leica, a Canon or something else so I am maybe the wrong person to ask given my bias towards the wind, wind, wind experience. I don't believe I have ever lost a shot because of this either so I must say I do not think that doing it the old way is really a disadvantage unless you have a time machine and have scored a job as a photo reporter in 1957.

I have seen a Canon trigger wind although I have not used one. I seem to recall they are not cheap to buy, least the ones I saw were not. So you may have something in your hand that is worth almost as much as the camera itself if you desired to sell it. But I do not think I have ever seen a IVSB2 base-plate for sale so it may be a bit difficult to realize your ambition given the need for one to replace the said winder if you wish to keep the camera in service. So my advice would be hang onto it unless you get lucky.

BTW the IVSB 2 is in my view the best of the early style Canon rangefinder cameras. It is distinguished by having a slightly less pokey viewfinder than the older models including if memory serves me correct, the IVSB, its forebear. I owned one (the SB2) for a number of years before stupidly selling it (for God knows what reason). It had the much loved and admired 50mm f1.5 lens that is so in vogue right now and I always regretted it as it was a sweet camera to use, especially with that lens which like most Sonnar designs has a certain je ne sais quoi. Like all LTM cameras though, it was a little hit and miss in terms of actually getting shots - but of course, that's part of the fun.

I should also add that I think the later Canon cameras with the bottom wind missed the mark a bit as they did not come with both top lever and bottom wind. (A few later models had a top wind lever, this innovation having replaced the windy knob by then but most other models had the bottom wind trigger instead). It was always my view that assuming Canon was committed to bottom wind technology, a camera with both would be a far more attractive proposition and have far greater market appeal, due to the obvious flexibility it afforded. Presumably you have that flexibility with an accessory bottom wind for the IVSB2 given it also has a knob wind so go for it!
__________________
Peter M

Flickr me: http://www.flickr.com/photos/80702381@N00/[SIGPIC]

Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston S Churchill
  Reply With Quote

Old 5 Days Ago   #11
goamules
Registered User
 
goamules is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,009
I'd like to try the winder for the small Canons. With the big ones, the VTs, it makes the camera so big I don't like the whole package.
__________________
Garrett

My Flickr Photos
  Reply With Quote

Old 5 Days Ago   #12
Bingley
Registered User
 
Bingley's Avatar
 
Bingley is offline
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sacramento, California
Posts: 4,496
The IVSB2 I purchased several years ago, from a member here, came with a rapidwinder, and I used it for awhile. Ultimately, though, I acquired a regular baseplate (by purchasing the cheapest Canon III I could find) and have used the IVSB2 since in a conventional configuration. I don't mind the winding knob and appreciate the sleeker look of the camera without the rapidwinder.
__________________
Steve

M2, M4-2, IIIc, IVSB2, & T, and assorted LTM & M lenses
XD-11, X700, and assorted MD Rokkor lenses, Rolleicord III, Rolleiflex Automat MX-EVS




My Flickr
My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Days Ago   #13
ellisson
Registered User
 
ellisson's Avatar
 
ellisson is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Elkins Park, PA
Posts: 193
One advantage that I find with the rapid winder on knob wind cameras is the ability to recompose or re-frame a subject from slightly different angles or perspectives with minimal camera motion and without taking my eye off the viewfinder. It's mainly a convenient way to 'not repeat' what I already did (the memory is fading with age!). Its kind of like a memory aid for me!
__________________
flickrgallery
Pbase gallery
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:46.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.