Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Image Processing: Darkroom / Lightroom / Film > Film vs Digital

Film vs Digital Discussions about the relative advantages and disadvantages of Film vs Digital are important as they can help us understand our choices as photographers. Each medium has strengths and weaknesses which can best be used in a given circumstance. While this makes for an interesting and useful discussion, DO NOT attack others who disagree with you. Forum rules are explained in the RFF FAQ linked at the top of each page.

View Poll Results: Would he use film or digital?
I believe he would still use film. film has much more to offer, even now. 134 38.51%
He would go M9 for sure 162 46.55%
D700 after he nagged on forums about the M8 magenta problem 52 14.94%
Voters: 348. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Old 04-15-2012   #81
ajuk
Registered User
 
ajuk's Avatar
 
ajuk is offline
Join Date: Nov 2006
Age: 32
Posts: 88
Did Jerry Uelsmann go digital, the most impressive thing about his work was that it was done without the aid of a computer.
__________________
Canonet QL-17 GIII, Olympus 35RD, Olympus MJUII x2, Olympus MJU, Olympus XA2.
Nikon F80 and F90x, 4 OM bodies. Pentax ME Super and K100D, Bronica ETRs.
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-10-2012   #82
Ti29er
Registered User
 
Ti29er is offline
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 42
He went on to paint and wasn't very sucessful.
Then died.
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-14-2012   #83
Blanc
Registered User
 
Blanc's Avatar
 
Blanc is offline
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Brive la Gaillarde, France
Posts: 48
A really weird question;
HCB tended to love 35mm qualities and grain, remember that he was using Rollei 35 cameras for shots that could've been done with a monorail or any mf camera.

So I don't know what he would do for sure but he can go to the M9 or keep shooting film.
__________________
Camera tech specialized in rare weird and old gear overhaul. Fancy bellowmaker, crazy machinist. Be careful grumpy Frenchie 1hour per day at least...
http://www.atelierdeblanc.fr (I'll write an english section one day!)
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-25-2012   #84
xxloverxx
Shoot.
 
xxloverxx is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 607
I thought the only reason he started photography was because it was like an instant painting for him. Don't think he would've cared too much about equipment.
__________________
http://hugopoon.smugmug.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-09-2012   #85
taxi38
Taxi Driver
 
taxi38's Avatar
 
taxi38 is offline
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Age: 60
Posts: 225
He insisted that his photos were printed straight,no artifice,so raw would have been out as it requires some adjustment.So he would have gone for the best j-peg camera,which to my mind would have been olympus.I think a pen.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-09-2012   #86
denizg7
Dennis Van Patten
 
denizg7 is offline
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: New York , New York
Posts: 723
he would use the monochrom
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-10-2012   #87
Photo_Smith
Registered User
 
Photo_Smith's Avatar
 
Photo_Smith is offline
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,482
My guess is that he'd go digital to have more control, he'd be able to photoshop his images to perfection:


He'd still add sprockets–he loved sprockets.
Can't hold back progress!!
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-16-2012   #88
ramosa
Registered User
 
ramosa is online now
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,015
But HCB had no interest in even manipulating film images (i.e., printing). He had others do that. I think he'd still use film. Heck, he was wealthy enough to pay others to print for him--and that would still be the case today.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-30-2012   #89
rxmd
May contain traces of nut
 
rxmd's Avatar
 
rxmd is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Kyrgyzstan
Posts: 5,806
Today I received a present (from myself, but a present nonetheless ) in the form of the original 1952 issue of "The Decisive Moment".

After looking at the collection of pictures and reading his introductory essay on what was and what wasn't important for him about photography, I'd say he wouldn't bother with film, or anything technology- or gear-centric, and probably no classic camera either. He'd probably use a cellphone camera, or barring that, a good compact fast digicam, somewhere between a Ricoh GRD and a Nikon 1, and he'd shoot it in B&W JPEG mode.
__________________
Bing! You're hypnotized!
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-17-2012   #90
kraj8995
-
 
kraj8995 is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 11
He was one of the earliest pioneers for street photography and in fact was the person who coined the word "reportage". He is an inspiration to many and probably any photojournalist would instantly recognise his work.promotional gifts
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-17-2012   #91
Turtle
Registered User
 
Turtle is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 2,635
the only thing I dont know is that I don't know.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-17-2012   #92
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 22,929
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxi38 View Post
He insisted that his photos were printed straight,no artifice,so raw would have been out as it requires some adjustment.So he would have gone for the best j-peg camera,which to my mind would have been olympus.I think a pen.
From all I've ever heard/read from his printers, this was more than just being economical with the truth.

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Go to www.rogerandfrances.eu for a whole new website
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-17-2012   #93
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 22,929
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajuk View Post
Did Jerry Uelsmann go digital, the most impressive thing about his work was that it was done without the aid of a computer.
No, I'd say that the most impressive thing was his vision, though his technical skill must come a close second. Met him once. His was slightly embarrassed when I told him how much I admired his work.

Another photographer I admire, Charlie Lemay (http://www.charlielemay.net/) has it easier with digital imaging but still has an impressive vision.

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Go to www.rogerandfrances.eu for a whole new website
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-12-2012   #94
Pirate
Guitar playing Fotografer
 
Pirate's Avatar
 
Pirate is offline
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Highland, Mi.
Age: 46
Posts: 1,868
Quote:
Originally Posted by denizg7 View Post
he would use the monochrom
Ditto .........
__________________


Leica II IIIc M3, Mamiya C2, Nikon F, F3P, F5, Hasselblad 500C/M, SW/C, Crown Graphic 4x5, Rollei 3.5F / SLX / Baby Gray, Sinar F and P 4x5, Polaroid 100 & 450 Land, Kodak Retina II and IIa, Fuji GW690II, Graphic View II 4x5.

http://dudewithad700.deviantart.com/
http://arolloffilm.blogspot.com/
My Top 10(12) Best!



  Reply With Quote

Old 10-27-2012   #95
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 22,929
Quote:
Originally Posted by kraj8995 View Post
He was one of the earliest pioneers for street photography and in fact was the person who coined the word "reportage". He is an inspiration to many and probably any photojournalist would instantly recognise his work.
Hardly, as the word was widely used in its modern sense in the late 19th century, and the first reported use was in 1612. I'd be surprised if he were even the first to apply it to photography. Have you any reference for this?

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Go to www.rogerandfrances.eu for a whole new website
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-27-2012   #96
gsgary
Registered User
 
gsgary is offline
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Chesterfield, Derbyshire
Posts: 484
I think he would still be shooting film because towards the end of his life he went back to art and drawing
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-03-2012   #97
sparrow6224
Registered User
 
sparrow6224's Avatar
 
sparrow6224 is offline
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New York NY
Posts: 944
Just a quick correction, at the end of his life he returned to making images by hand, but only in drawing as far as I know; I don't recall that he took up painting again.

Given his stature and wealth, he might do what I read Salgado was doing, a few years ago: the film he traveled with everywhere was getting x-rayed too many times so he finally started mixing in digital work -- pentax 645 D I think -- but he'd worked out with the labs how to handle the iimages: there were put onto film, negatives were created, and with these, not with computers, they did the printing, traditional style. When we say digital will match film in 2 more generations; I think it's already done that in color. But the printing is anemic. And in black and white, the printing is just out of the question.

He was a journalist. He'd use both.

V
__________________
Best,
Vince





http://www.flickr.com/photos/commodiusvicus/
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-13-2013   #98
rolo
Registered User
 
rolo's Avatar
 
rolo is offline
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 124
If he was in his prime today, he'd be using what all his olleagues at Magnum are using, a Canon 5D.

For his wedding work, he'd be using a Canon 5D.

Although he was never adept at processing and printing, in a modern photojournalist role he'd have to cope with the basics of Lightroom to process and upload his jpegs. If he didn't, his work would be unemployable and he'd not rise above the mass of capable guys out there.

If he was starting today, he'd know nothing other than digital and probably shoot a compact.

He was a man of his time. He wasn't a Leica fan boy that he's made out to be.

I chatted to Chris Steele Perkins in the London Magnum gallery last year and he, like Martin Parr and Sebastian Salgado, uses a Canon. Chris and Marin use 5Ds and Chris explained he did so because it does the job for very little expense. Film in his line of work was a ridiculous idea, he'd not used it since 2004.

He went on to say that he could even remember how to use a rangefinder camera and had no reason to contemplate it when AF is perfect for the work.

Now I'm aware that there are some Magnum photographers that still use film cameras for personal projects because they like film, but even Elliott Erwitt uses digital for his work assignments. Many of us enjoy film, including me, but from what I know HCB was not a hobbyist, he was a jobbing photographer with a great eye.
__________________
My Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/rolophoto/
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-13-2013   #99
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 22,929
Quote:
Originally Posted by rolo View Post
If he was in his prime today, he'd be using what all his olleagues at Magnum are using, a Canon 5D.

For his wedding work, he'd be using a Canon 5D.

Although he was never adept at processing and printing, in a modern photojournalist role he'd have to cope with the basics of Lightroom to process and upload his jpegs. If he didn't, his work would be unemployable and he'd not rise above the mass of capable guys out there.

If he was starting today, he'd know nothing other than digital and probably shoot a compact.

He was a man of his time. He wasn't a Leica fan boy that he's made out to be.

I chatted to Chris Steele Perkins in the London Magnum gallery last year and he, like Martin Parr and Sebastian Salgado, uses a Canon. Chris and Marin use 5Ds and Chris explained he did so because it does the job for very little expense. Film in his line of work was a ridiculous idea, he'd not used it since 2004.

He went on to say that he could even remember how to use a rangefinder camera and had no reason to contemplate it when AF is perfect for the work.

Now I'm aware that there are some Magnum photographers that still use film cameras for personal projects because they like film, but even Elliott Erwitt uses digital for his work assignments. Many of us enjoy film, including me, but from what I know HCB was not a hobbyist, he was a jobbing photographer with a great eye.
No, I don't think so. I think that the 'rich kid' epithet is not entirely undeserved here. He could do as whatever he damn' well pleased, but he was so good that 'whatever he damn' well pleased' was very popular. That ˇs NOT the same as being a jobbing photographer.

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Go to www.rogerandfrances.eu for a whole new website
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-09-2013   #100
Landshark
Registered User
 
Landshark is offline
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Montgomery, Il
Posts: 546
digital HCB?
Auto exposure, Auto focus, Auto anything else? He could be blind to do that part.
Oh yes, 10+ frames/sec. Then he could edit the (images) negs to find his "decisive moment". Then he could combine the images too. gotta get that stronger image.
__________________
Heavily sedated for your protection!
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-18-2013   #101
Pioneer
Registered User
 
Pioneer's Avatar
 
Pioneer is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Age: 62
Posts: 2,649
Naah, he'd us his cell phone for sure
__________________
"Your 1st 10,000 Photographs Are Your Worst"
HCBresson

"My 2nd 10,000 Are Not A Lot Better"
Dan
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-18-2013   #102
airfrogusmc
Registered User
 
airfrogusmc is offline
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Landshark View Post
digital HCB?
Auto exposure, Auto focus, Auto anything else? He could be blind to do that part.
Oh yes, 10+ frames/sec. Then he could edit the (images) negs to find his "decisive moment". Then he could combine the images too. gotta get that stronger image.
No drives for Henri. He detested the machine gun approach. He spent his entire career perfecting seeing and finding the moment not blasting through it. If he went digital it would probably be an MM. Using the DoF scales were second nature to him so he would need auto focus becasue no auto focus in the world is faster than pre focused.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-21-2013   #103
Scrambler
Registered User
 
Scrambler's Avatar
 
Scrambler is offline
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Toowoomba
Posts: 1,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by rxmd View Post
Today I received a present (from myself, but a present nonetheless ) in the form of the original 1952 issue of "The Decisive Moment".

After looking at the collection of pictures and reading his introductory essay on what was and what wasn't important for him about photography, I'd say he wouldn't bother with film, or anything technology- or gear-centric, and probably no classic camera either. He'd probably use a cellphone camera, or barring that, a good compact fast digicam, somewhere between a Ricoh GRD and a Nikon 1, and he'd shoot it in B&W JPEG mode.
+1 based on what I've read and the exhibition I saw. Fast, light, don't sweat the details. I suspect that if he thought at all about technology in deciding on a digital camera it would only be about shutter lag.

He wouldn't use a Leica because it's no longer the fastest, lightest, smallest decent IQ product. My money would be on a quality cellphone. And he would be just as famous!
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-21-2013   #104
bessadriver
Registered User
 
bessadriver's Avatar
 
bessadriver is offline
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Vancouver
Age: 26
Posts: 4
I agree. HCB was only interested in capturing the image. He often instructed his film and print processors to not alter the images in any way. I feel he would be a smart phone camera user today.
__________________
Cheers!

Bessa R - 15 Heliar - 21 Skopar - 35 Skopar - 50 Skopar - 50 Nokton - 85 Heliar

"Light makes photography. Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. Know it for all you are worth, and you will know the key to photography."
– George Eastman
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-26-2013   #105
taxi38
Taxi Driver
 
taxi38's Avatar
 
taxi38 is offline
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Age: 60
Posts: 225
If he was to go digital,and he just might,if only for the novelty of flipping through his images on his ipad at the end of the day,I think he'd go for a Nikon 1 V2.He was never one to worry about the ultimate in quality......,the modern excuse for "art"in photography,.....and the nikon is one of the few cameras to offer a genuine increase in the speed of taking a photograph.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-08-2014   #106
noisycheese
Normal(ish) Human
 
noisycheese is offline
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,211
Quote:
Originally Posted by varjag View Post
Uh, he died in 2004, mind you. Digital cameras at this point were widely available, he could use one if he wanted.

Case closed.
Good point.

Knowing what we know of the redoubtable HCB's personality and given the fact that others did his developing and printing, I cannot see him being swept off his feet by digital cameras.

JMHO.
__________________
The Leica M passion: From the inside it's hard to explain; from the outside it's hard to understand.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-08-2014   #107
airfrogusmc
Registered User
 
airfrogusmc is offline
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,638
We'll never know but there has been a recent convert that is on record as saying he had no interest in digital until the MM. Ralph Gibson....

I know i was never a fan of digital B&W until the MM. Not saying that film is or should take a back seat. I still love film and had to downsize some years back so lost my darkroom but the MM is an amazing B&W tool. I do think he still shoot with a rangefinder. Maybe he might choose an MM. It would be a natural progression as it was with Gibson but we will never know. We do know he loved Leica Ms.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-08-2014   #108
sparrow6224
Registered User
 
sparrow6224's Avatar
 
sparrow6224 is offline
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New York NY
Posts: 944
He was indeed alive in the digital era but he was no longer photographing, and hadn't for years. He was only drawing. Which is what he would have continued doing.

It's not true that he told people processing his film not to alter anything in any way. He had a long relationship with his lab in Paris and particular people there. He did not want his photographs cropped by the magazines that bought them but they often went ahead and did this anyway, sometimes in absolutely gruesome ways. But in process and production he was quite aware that he was shooting slow, low contrast film often on the fly at f/8 or f/5.6 zone focused and his people in Paris knew what to do with his negatives and particularly with his prints to bring out the best of the image.

I think if he were around now as a much younger man his values regarding equipment would be different. He was in aesthetics and even in practice an underground surrealist. Robert Capa instructed him never to let the magazines know of these inclinations, to describe himself strictly as a journalist, which he did, but you can see it, the surrealist impulse, all through his work. If you follow what people are doing now, a lot of it is far from traditional photography and is often a creation of an image that was never before them, made from disparate parts. I think the creative artist in him would be thrilled with the possibilities, though at the same time I'm not sure he would have had any patience whatsoever with the post processing requirements, just as he had none with lab work. He lived for the moment when the shutter snapped. After that, spiritually speaking, he was done. Also, even if he were photographing digitally, he was not a fan of color, and much preferred black and white, and as Salgado does now (also with considerable expert assistance), he would (I think) have gone to great lengths to achieve finished prints that retained the tonal depth and richness of silver gelatin printing.

It's kind of a silly question all in all. I mean of course that if he were a younger man, young now, he would not be Henri Cartier-Bresson in any way that we understand that identity to be.

More interesting to me is Avedon, who photographed well into the digital age. What did he do??
__________________
Best,
Vince





http://www.flickr.com/photos/commodiusvicus/
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-09-2014   #109
airfrogusmc
Registered User
 
airfrogusmc is offline
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,638
He only told the magazines not to crop his finished images in any way or he would bring a suit for copyright infringement. That correspondence was in the huge exhibit of his Henri Cartier-Bresson The Modern Century. THey also had some of his instruction to those that printed his work and he was pretty precise in his burning and dodging instruction. So think that he didn't have any involvement in the final part process is wrong.

And what did Gibson do? He wasn't interested at all in digital until the MM.
  Reply With Quote

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=96690
Old 06-25-2014   #110
leicapixie
Registered User
 
leicapixie is offline
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Toronto.Canada
Posts: 1,231
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=96690

HCB is known to have processed many of his films..
The printing was done by masters who knew his preferences.
The one thing nobody has discussed is that at a certain point, his prints were regarded as ART.
Collectable art.

Re-think the digital imaging..
I think he would have jumped at it!
Not necessarily with a Leica.
An i-phone, a compact, something handy and portable.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-26-2014   #111
mickbenjamins
Registered User
 
mickbenjamins's Avatar
 
mickbenjamins is offline
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Berlin, Germany
Posts: 14
Too much internet fighting, too few pictures.
__________________
Facebook | Soundcloud
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-10-2015   #112
moreorless
Registered User
 
moreorless is offline
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 38
He'd kick an ass or two that's what Henri Cartier-Bresson would do.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-01-2015   #113
DNG
Film Friendly
 
DNG's Avatar
 
DNG is offline
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Camby, Indiana. USA
Age: 63
Posts: 2,956
I am changing my vote from M9 or digital >>>> To Film

Reason...
We are still not at a point where digital files can have 100 year + archive where there will be a way to read them.

Yes, BluRay has an archive life that long... BUT, will we be able to READ a BR in 100 years???

That is the problem with Digital.

Will film continue in 50 years? 75? 100? Possibly, but in basic selections of B&W and Color?
We still have 4x5,5x7,8x10,11x14 films available... so, basic 35mm choices may still be available for a long time to come..
__________________
Feedback Link
Flickr: My Street
Other Gallories
Nikon: F2, FM2n, EM, Konica FS-1, Fuji X100T
Nikkor: 24mm f/2.8 Ais, 28mm f/3.5 Ai, 50mm f/1.4 N/Ai
Hexanon: 40mm f/1.8 AR, 57mm f/1.2 AR
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-13-2015   #114
Alberti
Registered User
 
Alberti's Avatar
 
Alberti is offline
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Holland
Posts: 265
The fact that these artist photographers, just like Corbijn as a modern equivalent, used a camera that was convenient and close to the action, and used a developer lab, means they did not care about film on/by itself. Film is a medium to get the picture out. They themselves were in and part of the action.

I like to contend:
  • They did not choose film for posteriority.
  • They just looked at the assignment.
  • They chose the camera for its ability to focus on the action, know the focal plane, but look through that plane transparently (this is the raison d'ętre of the RFF)
  • They new the effects they would get with their film.
  • They needed the latitude of the film.
  • . . for them - its a black box, that dark room.
  • All (ok, many) of them used rather fast film and hence grain and some blurred results that mixed up well in the output when enlarged well.

So what would they use now: a MM, with its wide latitude, and have a digital post processing "Black Box" do the "trick" of rendering. MM offers even more latitude than their FP4 or Tri-X in Microdol. Their lab would create a special profile for them if required. Tools enough.
And:
Once some smart guy would come up and be able to really print the micro grain of our B/W images (JPG tends to smear out what we artificially created in micro structure of the grain; spoiling the result ) we/they would be happy.
The same reasoning goes for his color film prints of course.
__________________
Leica aficionado
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-15-2015   #115
giganova
Registered User
 
giganova is offline
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 818
Sebastiao Salgado changed from film (Leica R6) to digital (mostly Canon DSLR), so why wouldn't HCB switch to digital? Professional photographers are not nearly as obsessed with camera technology as enthusiasts are. A camera is a tool to capture your vision, nothing else, and it doesn't matter how you get there.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-15-2015   #116
giganova
Registered User
 
giganova is offline
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 818
Here's your answer from a statistics point of view. The likelihood of Cartier-Bresson using a Leica today is 7% and the likelihood that he would stick with film is 2%:

  Reply With Quote

Old 10-28-2015   #117
Rikard
Registered User
 
Rikard is offline
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 68
I guess it depends on how much he would care about the look of his images. Maybe he would settle for digital. But as I understand it, he was pretty well off, so I doubt it.
__________________
Shoots with Mamiya 7ii, Leica M6 and Holga.
Instagram: rikard_lindby
Tumblr: http://rikardlindby.tumblr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-20-2016   #118
Capt. E
Registered User
 
Capt. E is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 40
HC never printed any of his images, so I believe digital would have been attractive to him. More immediate feedback.
He was all about the "decisive moment". He would perhaps want a Leica Monochrome with a 50 Summilux. Heck, Ansel Adams would be making digital images if he were still around (though I like to think he would still be using film primarily, probably film/digital hybrid processes).
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-20-2016   #119
Capt. E
Registered User
 
Capt. E is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by leicapixie View Post
HCB is known to have processed many of his films..
The printing was done by masters who knew his preferences.
The one thing nobody has discussed is that at a certain point, his prints were regarded as ART.
Collectable art.

Re-think the digital imaging..
I think he would have jumped at it!
Not necessarily with a Leica.
An i-phone, a compact, something handy and portable.
Good Points. He may have been using film along with digital. He would be working with the best masters of digital printing, as it is getting very hard to find a lab that still does wet silver prints. I feel certain he would have loved the Leica Monochrom.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-04-2016   #120
Rikard
Registered User
 
Rikard is offline
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 68
The statement "still shooting film" sounds really old. I mean I started with digital and so did most of my friends. Nowadays everybody shoots film. To "still" be doing something would be noteworthy if that meant still be using a digital camera (phone excluded). I think HCB
probably would have jumped on the digital train fairly early, but as soon as he found out that the kind of work he wanted to do really did not require him to chose less quality for
convinience he would be back with film. I dont think of hcb as some pj who spent a few days on a story, uploaded 10000 files to the magazine and moved on. I think he wanted to produce real meaningful work which would stand the test of time. And when Leica would approach him and offer him money to start using the Monochrome he would have the integrity to say f*** you. Not just because he didn't need the money, but because he was stubborn and knew how to keep it real real.
__________________
Shoots with Mamiya 7ii, Leica M6 and Holga.
Instagram: rikard_lindby
Tumblr: http://rikardlindby.tumblr.com
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 17:48.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.