Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Being a Photographer > Technique: How To Shoot It

Technique: How To Shoot It Ask questions about how to take pics, as well as share your own favorite shooting tips.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

sandbag recommendation - how heavy do I need?
Old 01-12-2016   #1
haring
Registered User
 
haring is offline
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 92
sandbag recommendation - how heavy do I need?

I have a Flashpoint Rovelight 600 monolight. I would like to take it to the beach for engagement photos and wedding photos.
The only problem is that it is a little bit top heavy. The battery is in the head unit itself.
I would like to use the light on a manfrotto light stand and a medium size softbox.

I am just wondering what size of sandbag do I need? What is your recommendation? We often shoot engagement sessions ans wedding portrait sessions on the beach. Wind is an issue.
__________________
miami wedding photographers
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-12-2016   #2
kymar
Registered User
 
kymar's Avatar
 
kymar is offline
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 166
I use studio lights indoors and gerallay use about 3kg but if you're outdoors with the possibility of wind gusts I'd maybe get 2 or 3 bags. A lot easier to lug than a single 10kg bag unless you've got a very buff assistant.
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-12-2016   #3
Rick Waldroup
Registered User
 
Rick Waldroup's Avatar
 
Rick Waldroup is offline
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 903
Trust me on this. You can never have too much weight.

I shoot a lot of events outdoors and wind is the number one enemy. I use sandbags weighted down with gravel. Each sandbag weighs about 20 pounds. I use a minimum of 4 on each stand, sometimes many more. You can get these sandbags on ebay or Amazon. Back in the old days, I used to weigh my stands down with huge bags of cat litter.

The more weight you have on any stands, the much better off you will be.

Never underestimate the power of wind.
__________________
Rick Waldroup Photography
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-12-2016   #4
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD, USA; Toronto, Ont, Canada
Posts: 4,019
3 - 15lb sandbags should do it (one for each strut). I have the kind that have handles, so they're not too bad to carry around. Do you have a cart? If not, that would go a long way to making your life easier in terms of lugging things around. Get one with big fat wheels, particularly for the beach!

If it's windy, the other thing you have to watch is that your soft box doesn't get all turned around. Maybe it might not be as bad as an umbrella, but something to keep in mind.
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-12-2016   #5
jloden
Registered User
 
jloden's Avatar
 
jloden is offline
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 101
I've used 15lb sandbags just to hold similar lights with a small modifier indoors, so I would agree with the other commenters. I don't think it's overkill to suggest at least a couple 15lb bags or more for an outdoor beach shoot!
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-14-2016   #6
haring
Registered User
 
haring is offline
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 92
I will do that! 15lb! How do yo carry your gear around? A cart?
__________________
miami wedding photographers
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-17-2016   #7
milosdevino
Registered User
 
milosdevino is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 54
When I was an assistant, we used to travel with a couple of nylon sleeping bag covers. When we got to location (very often a beach) we filled them with sand. Instant sandbag!
No lugging. Once finished, empty the sand out.
If it is very windy, tie a guy rope to the stand and the other end to the sand bag. Bury the sand bag. It's called a "dead man" and is very effective.
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-17-2016   #8
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD, USA; Toronto, Ont, Canada
Posts: 4,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by haring View Post
I will do that! 15lb! How do yo carry your gear around? A cart?
You don't have a cart? If not, I highly recommend that you do. This will become readily apparent as you get older

These ones are very versatile and will fit it back seat of a four-door: http://rocknrollercart.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-17-2016   #9
sevo
Fokutorendaburando
 
sevo is online now
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Frankfurt, Germany
Posts: 6,280
Where wind and softboxes are concerned, as heavy as possible. Personally, I usually brought two light metal counterweights, a empty big sandbag and a empty folding water canister (in case there is a tap on location) for each softbox. And a roll of parachute cord and a bag of camping and mountaineering gadgets to secure everything to any possible surface I might run into. These days, I'd probably get a waterproof rafting bag to hold anything, whether water or rocks, but back then, these still were very expensive.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-12-2016   #10
haring
Registered User
 
haring is offline
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by milosdevino View Post
When I was an assistant, we used to travel with a couple of nylon sleeping bag covers. When we got to location (very often a beach) we filled them with sand. Instant sandbag!
No lugging. Once finished, empty the sand out.
If it is very windy, tie a guy rope to the stand and the other end to the sand bag. Bury the sand bag. It's called a "dead man" and is very effective.
I think this is what I am going to copy! Awesome and very creative!
__________________
miami wedding photographers
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-12-2016   #11
Larry H-L
Registered User
 
Larry H-L is offline
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 355
I've also asked young teenagers at weddings to "spot" my light stand even when sand-bagged, keeping the umbrella pointed in the correct direction. Give them $25, and they are thrilled for 45-60 minutes of work.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-13-2016   #12
Rico
Registered User
 
Rico's Avatar
 
Rico is offline
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Chicago, IL, USA
Posts: 927
Another method that is suitable for beaches or parks: drive tent pegs into the ground, and tie down your stand.
__________________

Rico Tudor. Leica M4, IIIb, 28, 35, 50, 90, 135, 280. Contax T, RTS; Canon; Nikon; Profoto
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-13-2016   #13
sevo
Fokutorendaburando
 
sevo is online now
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Frankfurt, Germany
Posts: 6,280
One word: Leverage! You can calculate the safe weight to attach to the base of a single pole stand if you know the surface it presents to the wind - but by the point you have a counterweight that will hold it down in any situation, there is a fair chance that the pole will snap in a gale.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 00:48.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.