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Photographing skiing
Old 12-26-2015   #1
PrestonR
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Photographing skiing

Hello RFFers,

I might go on a short ski trip with a couple friends, I have absolutely no experience skiing but I do want to take a camera... Specifically my mamiya C330 with 80/2.8 and some kodak tri-x.

Would this be practical?
What are good ways to carry and store the camera when partaking in such an activity?
Tips for shooting skiers/snowboarders?
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Old 12-26-2015   #2
Richard G
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I took a tiny Leica C-Lux 2 the last time I went skiing. It is a small flat parcel I kept in an outer pocket over my left arm. The crucial thought I had was that a Leica M between me and the piste in a fall would guarantee a much worse injury, broken ribs for certain. I did also have an M2 with a 50 Summicron, but didn't use that when skiing myself. I was happy with the 50 for photographing my children. I think a TLR would seriously cramp your style. And I understand there's nothing heavier then the C330.
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Old 12-26-2015   #3
Ko.Fe.
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Any camera is practical if you know how to use it.

While on the lift observe where most interesting spot is. Plow down to this spot. Take off ski, place them where they are out of the skiers way. Walk to the spot, make sure you are not in the way of the skiers. Prefocus, wait, pan and frame. Your goal is to get as close as possible. If yours C has sport finder, use it. My 33 was with the prism.

Also. Take off ski once you are on the top. This location is always offer something interesting. Depends how high it is, it might be much colder up where. Make sure you are prepared for this. You could also guff around lodge and take candids.
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Old 12-28-2015   #4
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I took a lot of pics while skiing some years ago. heavy camera will slow you down, and it may be a trouble if you fall. I'd suggest a point and shoot. Something simple like olympus mju2. I've used my nikon f80, leica m4, but oly was the most convinient camera for the task. Besides it's waterproof and it will not break from the impact (at least mine didn't)
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Old 12-28-2015   #5
ferider
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I've broken a camera into two when skiing (a Minolta 7000i).

If you are a skiing novice you will fall, that's part of the learning experience. You will sweat, so there is condensation and moisture from snow, etc. Safest place for your camera is a backpack. But risky even there. I'm an experienced ski-er, but I wouldn't take a large camera again myself, rather a Rollei 35 or Minolta CL or similar. The smaller, the harder to break .... Also, consider leaving your camera at the lift bottom/top, sometimes they have lock boxes.

Roland.
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Old 12-28-2015   #6
Larry Cloetta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrestonR View Post
Hello RFFers,

I might go on a short ski trip with a couple friends, I have absolutely no experience skiing but I do want to take a camera... Specifically my mamiya C330 with 80/2.8 and some kodak tri-x.

Would this be practical?
What are good ways to carry and store the camera when partaking in such an activity?
Tips for shooting skiers/snowboarders?
I admire your spirit, but if you really don't have any experience skiing, this seems a recipe for both a ruined camera and physical pain. I live in a ski resort, and if I take a good camera out, it is with the intention of only taking pictures, and not doing any serious skiing. Even if I was intending on skiing I would have to accept, in advance, the possibility of ruining my camera, so would not take a camera I was not willing to destroy. It is just December, and we have already had two people die on the hill here. We can tell ourselves that if we are careful, it's all under control, but that's not how it works on snow. Stuff happens. If you have not skied before, you are going to fall, possibly in the parking lot. Trying to manage an unwieldy camera on top of all the other gear you are not accustomed to dealing with isn't going to make it any easier.
Having said that, Ko.Fe. has offered some good tips. With that camera, I would advise either dedicating the day to skiing, or photography, but not both. Getting arresting shots on the bunny slopes isn't usually going to happen because everyone is going 2 miles an hour, though photos of young kids can be great there. If you can get up higher next to a high speed run, underneath a jump, you can get some good shots, but stay well off to the side, out of everyone's way. Try not to be a nuisance, both for your safety and the safety of others.
As to the Tri-X, depends on the results you are aiming for. I live in a place completely covered with snow 8 months out of the year. Trying to be consistently interesting with B&W film in this environment is challenging. There is no tonal range.
Also, if the weather is decent, you are going to have brighter lighting conditions than anything found outside of Venus. I'd recommend some Pan F 50, or Velvia, just in case. If you make it to the top of the mountain and take pix of your friends overlooking the valley, with the snow underfoot, and the unbelievably blue sky in the background you will wish you had some color film, and/or some ND filters.
Just my 2 cents worth. You could not pay me to ski with a C330, but I've become risk adverse. If your friends are good skiers, and they are encouraging this, they are not your friends
But, God Bless you for even considering this.
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Old 12-28-2015   #7
KM-25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Cloetta View Post
I admire your spirit, but if you really don't have any experience skiing, this seems a recipe for both a ruined camera and physical pain. I live in a ski resort, and if I take a good camera out, it is with the intention of only taking pictures, and not doing any serious skiing. Even if I was intending on skiing I would have to accept, in advance, the possibility of ruining my camera, so would not take a camera I was not willing to destroy. It is just December, and we have already had two people die on the hill here. We can tell ourselves that if we are careful, it's all under control, but that's not how it works on snow. Stuff happens. If you have not skied before, you are going to fall, possibly in the parking lot. Trying to manage an unwieldy camera on top of all the other gear you are not accustomed to dealing with isn't going to make it any easier.
+1.

I also live in a ski resort and one of my biggest clients is the ski area so I snowboard 100 + days with all kinds of gear, Nikon, Leica, Hasselblad and even 4x5 on double black terrain.

It took years to be able to not be scared shirt-less that I was going to bail and not bust an expensive rig. It took over a decade to become an expert rider in that I could confidently go out with with any gear I own and bring it and my self back in one piece.

I would either skip the camera entirely or bring a small compact of some kind. Those who run the mountain and who you are sharing the slopes with will appreciate it.
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Old 12-28-2015   #8
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Thanks everyone for the advice! The c330 is my favorite camera and I don't want to break it, so it looks like it's staying at home. Perhaps I'll bring my canonet instead.
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Old 12-28-2015   #10
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Rate the Tri-X at 200 and bring an incident meter.

Read this blog on Johnny Patience's website on how to meter for film: http://www.johnnypatience.com/metering-for-film/ and you'll be fine.

Happy skiing!
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Old 12-29-2015   #11
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Update

I also have a Canonet ql17 (non functional meter) and an agfa isolette III with solinar 85/4.5. Both are fairly compact, what are your thoughts on bringing one of these?
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Old 12-29-2015   #12
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If you have no small cameras why not a disposable one? Maybe not the best technical solution but better than nothing...

I stopped skiing many years ago but I still remember what already said here when you learn falling is part of the experience...

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