Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Classic Film RangeFinders & Other Classics > Half Frames / Subminiatures

Half Frames / Subminiatures This forum is for all half frame 35mm cameras, including the very popular Olympus Pens and their SLR cousins, the Pen F and Pen FT, as well as all smaller than half frame subminiature film cameras.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Minolta 16II, Amazing little camera
Old 01-12-2015   #1
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
Minolta 16II, Amazing little camera

Finally found a camera that will let me use my old B&W 16mm motion picture film stock. A Minolta 16II. I am amazed at the image quality coming out of a camera smaller than a pack of cigarettes, with a lens that is smaller than a pencil eraser.








C&C always welcome.

Would love to see samples from others who have shot with these Minolta 16 cameras. They're a fun little set up to use.

Even rigged a small flash unit that works with it.


Best,
-Tim
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-12-2015   #2
htimsdj
Registered User
 
htimsdj is offline
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 79
They are great! I have a few of them, although I haven't run a cassette through recently.

With one of the cameras I purchased, I found it loaded with a cassette with all of the film on the "exposed" side. Figuring it might have something on it, I had it developed. There were three photos from the Vietnam War on it! I'll see if I can find them and post them later.
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-12-2015   #3
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
That is awesome! Would love to see them.

Before I got the camera I bought a couple of cassettes off the big auction site, that were supposed to be unused from the 1960's. They were both fully exposed and I found images on both. When I got this camera, it had a cassette of exposed color film inside, but when I processed that it came out completely black, completely exposed.

You can see the images I found on the two rolls at this link:
Look what I found . . .

Best,
-Tim
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-13-2015   #4
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
Fantastic job on your first use. Thanks for sharing these. I see you have the accessory shoe/tripod clamp, a very useful accessory. Are these from the Plus-X or is this still Double-X?

There are a few other useful things to tell you about the camera.
The focus is factory set to 2.5m (about 98 inches). You will find this a useful range for most shots and distant subjects at f16.
A very useful accessory to look for now is the lens set. This is a set of 4 slip on attachments consisting of three diopter lenses, two close up and one distance lens, and a yellow filter.
The #0 lens is a minus .25 and will bring focus out to 10m (33 ft.) for distance scenes at any aperture.
The #1 lens will bring focus to 1.3m (51 inches) for a moderate close up.
The #2 lens will bring focus to .75m (30 inches) for a head and shoulder type close up shot.

These sets are the only way to change prime focus on the camera. They should come in a round clear plastic case holding all 4 pieces. Make sure they are the right pieces and some one has not just placed 4 UVa filters in the slots. They are getting thin on the ground but I still see them occasionally on ebay. This set is probably the most useful accessory you can have for a 16II, especially the #0 lens for distant shots where you cannot stop down to f16.

That little 22mm f2.8 lens is usually very good. My very informal tests with some slit down Pan F indicates it will resolve about 50~60 LP/mm in the center even opened up to f4, not too shabby at all.
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-13-2015   #5
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
These were shot with the Plus-X I still have (7231). The camera came with the #1 filter which I mistook for a UV filter and wondered why my first roll was all out of focus, I thought, "Man, this lens is not very good." Then I looked at the manual and noticed the #1 on the filter and realized it was a close up filter. All is good now.

Best,
-Tim
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-13-2015   #6
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
That self portrait with the big 283 flash is a riot. I have a 285 but never thought to mount it on the 16II. I carry a very small old Vivitar 45, a single AA cell manual flash with an ISO 100 GN of 40 in feet. This flash uses Vivitar's regular PC cord so I don't have to have a hot shoe adapter with cord for this set up.

If you can buy/make a film slitter then all kinds of fine grain film is available for your Minolta. I have a couple of Ilford Pan F bulk rolls I got cheap because they were just out of date. I pull out 19 inches and pull through my slitter as necessary. I really would like to try a T grain film like T-Max 100 or Ilford Delta 100 but just never got around to buying any since I still have a lot of the Pan F. I also have about 80 feet left of 16mm Bluefire Police film and it is really grainless but I ran out of the special developer and when I tried it in regular developer it came out with almost zero grays, just black or clear on the neg. I read on the caffenol site of a formula for soft working caffenol for high contrast film that I'm going to try.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-25-2015   #7
Ko.Fe.
Me. Write ESL. Ko.
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Age: 50
Posts: 4,639
BH has fresh 16mm movie film in bulks under good price.
Will this camera take this film?
Thank you, Ko.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-25-2015   #8
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
Hi Ko,

The film that I found works the best with the Minolta 16II is the old 7231 and 7222 Kodak B&W negative film. 7231 is long gone unfortunately, but you can still get the 7222 from Kodak (it's the old Double-X stock).

The issue with the 16mm color film that B&H sells is that it has a remjet (sp) coating to keep light from bouncing off the pressure plate of a motion picture camera and double exposing the film. This coating is removed by processing houses that do motion picture film processing. If you run that film through a film processing machine like the ones at Walgreens or Cosco, it will gum up the whole machine (and really piss their employees off). So there really isn't any good way to process that 16mm color film.

As far as the 16mm B&W reversal film that B&H sells, that may work for you, but you would need to work out a processing workflow for yourself, as it is a reversal film. It's also probably really high contrast.

I process the 7222 in just normal B&W processing chemicals (in my case Rodinal), and it works fine.

Good luck. The cameras are a lot of fun.

Best,
-Tim
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-25-2015   #9
Ko.Fe.
Me. Write ESL. Ko.
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Age: 50
Posts: 4,639
Thank you, Tim!
Cine film is no problem for me. I do 135 in ECN-2 kits at home.
Is it difficult to load film in this camera cassettes?
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-25-2015   #10
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
As long as you have the chemical needed to remove the remjet you should be OK.

Go for the single perf film, not the double perf. And I don't find loading the film to be an issue at all. Carefully razor blade open a cassette, cut an 18" or so length of 16mm film, tape one end, emulsion side in, to the little spool on the takeup side inside the cassette, and curl up the unexposed length into the feed side of the cassette, then tape it back closed. Very straight forward.
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-26-2015   #11
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ko.Fe. View Post
Thank you, Tim!
Cine film is no problem for me. I do 135 in ECN-2 kits at home.
Is it difficult to load film in this camera cassettes?
I've always used a 5/16in. wood dowel, about 6 inches long, with a 16mm long slot cut into one end with an Xacto razor saw. Then slip one end of the film into the slot and spin the dowel, emulsion side in, guiding the film with your thumb and forefinger running along the edge to make a nice tight roll that you slip off the end of the dowel and into the feed chamber leaving about 1.5 inches sticking out of the light trap. Then put the cap on the feed chamber and the rest you can do in room light. Tape the film to the take up drum, slip that in the take-up chamber and put the cap back on. Secure both caps with a bit of blue masking tape. As long as you don't wait over 3 months the blue masking tape is easy to remove.

I don't know why you would have to razor blade open the caps, they are secured with tape, just peel it off.

Do you have developing reels that can take 16mm wide film?
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-04-2016   #12
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
Quote:
Originally Posted by zuiko85 View Post
I don't know why you would have to razor blade open the caps, they are secured with tape, just peel it off.
I've got cassettes from the early 1960's through the late 1980's, from a number of different film manufacturers. Some of the tape is easy to peel off, some of it is like cement. The ones like cement, I use a razor blade to separate the cassettes from the covers.

I agree, the blue "painter's tape" works really well when taping the covers back on the cassettes.
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-04-2016   #13
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
Picked up a Minolta 16QT this past week. Supposedly it had been sitting in the back room of a camera shop and had never been sold. As usual for these old cameras, the shutter assembly was locked up from dried, gummy internal lubrication. Was able to get it apart and completely cleaned up. Was even able to make a substitute battery for the now defunct PX-30 the camera used to take. And to my delight, it now works as new. Even the light meter is accurate.

Here's an image from the first roll of Double-X I ran through it, exposure based on the internal light meter. One other nice thing about the 16QT, you can focus this camera, it has four settings from close up to infinity. Unlike the 16II, which has the little lenses you need to put on the front for different focus distances.



The Double-X is pretty grainy, especially in this tiny negative size. Hope to load up some Plus-X to try later this week.

Fun little camera.
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-17-2016   #14
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
Finally checked this older thread to see what you were up to with 16mm film. Did you ever shoot the plus-x in the QT? For some reason I cannot see the sample photos in the body of your last post. Might be problems with my I-pad.
The bigger negative of the QT is some help in resolving detail, you don't have to enlarge it as much. That said I have looked at several QT's through the years, perhaps 4 or 5 and never found a working sample, even when they appear 'mint' on the outside. Too bad, I would like one for its bigger negative and ability to focus the lens. Looking forward to any more posts on your 16mm experiences.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-17-2016   #15
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
Hi Zuiko85,

Something got screwed up with the images and the first two have disappeared into the internet ether, but the last image is there. Haven't shot any Plus-X through the QT yet, just been too busy with other projects. I do like the bigger negative, and especially the ability to zone focus the camera. And the built in light meter. After opening the camera up and cleaning out the dried lube, she now works very reliably. And after making the adapter, the light meter now works with a common 1/3N battery. So it's a great little camera to carry around in the pocket.

Best,
-Tim
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-17-2016   #16
oftheherd
Registered User
 
oftheherd's Avatar
 
oftheherd is offline
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 7,659
The first Minolta 16 I ever saw was when I was in the 82nd Abn Div at Ft. Bragg in 1961 or 1962. We were practicing for a visit from Then president Kennedy. We were all amazed at this little camera a guy pulled out of his pocket and then began using. He told us he got it while stationed in Okinawa. In 1962 I went to Okinawa, and saw one in the PX for something like $25. I got one and used it a fair amount, and really liked it. Later, in 1967, I was in the 173rd in Vietnam, and we didn't have a crime scene camera. I used my father's old Welta Welti or the Minolta 16, whichever I happed to have when I needed crime scene photos.

The Minolta 16 worked amazingly well. I had all the attachments for it, including the cc filters and distance filters, and the flash. It was very easy to carry as well, which was kind of important at the time. I still have it and the flash adapter at home somewhere, as well as some of the filters.
__________________
My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-18-2016   #17
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
After saying I'd never get into any submini camera smaller than 16mm, ie Minox, I gave in and in a weak moment bought a really clean IIIs at a photo show last April. The guy had several on his table and when I asked about price he said $40, my selection. It came with the measuring chain and original case. Of course I've spent almost double that on obtaining 6 film cartridges but by slitting and loading my own B&W film ongoing film cost is about $1 per load. The other problem, not having a developing reel was solved by heavy modification of an old Yankee plastic reel.

Scan or print, scan or print?
With no way really to scan the negatives I built a small enlarger and can print up to 3 X 4.25 inch prints, not very large but about what you get from standard processing and prints from Blue Moon camera. Once you get set up the Minox is cheap to run and unlike my Minolta 16 II cameras, it can be focused, even down to 8 inches and that is a nice feature, no need to carry close up or distance lenses like I have for the Minolta. On the other hand the lens opening is fixed at f3.5 so DOF at short distances is very narrow, you have to measure carefully.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-18-2016   #18
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
So it uses the 16mm film as well?

That sounds cool. I like the QT because it too can focus. It has four settings, close-up, portrait, "standard" and infinity. I leave it on "standard" for 90% of the shots.

I was fortunate to find a couple stainless steel 16mm development reels which work great, but before I found them, I took a Patterson plastic reel and cut it down to take 16mm film. That worked pretty well too.

I'm also fortunate to have picked up one of the last new Nikon 9000ED scanners when they were still being sold as new, and even though they actually make a 16mm film strip holder for it($360, way too expensive), I use my Newton glass holder and just lay the strips down between the two glass elements.

Really fun and convenient cameras to shoot with. And the image quality brings back memories of my Instamatic that I used in middle school back in 1970.

Have fun with your Minox.

Best,
-Tim
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-18-2016   #19
Nokton48
Registered User
 
Nokton48's Avatar
 
Nokton48 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,072
I just found my Minolta 16MG! It was buried in a box in my studio. I had a relative who bought it from a PX in Vietnam (during the war) and it was gifted to me from his estate. I used it on my honeymoon with AG1 flashbulbs, then it disappeared. Now it is back. It has major sentimental value for me.

I have one 16mm stainless reel, and four Minolta cassettes, with the Minolta plastic storage boxes. I guess I should call Kodak and buy 100 feet of Eastman 7222. I am a huge fan of 35mm XX and use it all the time.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-18-2016   #20
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
Very cool. Yeah, the 7222 is the same as the 5222 (just smaller). If you look at the shooting double x in a leica thread, there are development times and chemicals listed. I've found you can shoot 7222 at ISO 1600 and process in D-76 and get really nice results.

If you find the shutter not working properly on your 16MG, sometimes if you remove the covers and use a bit of lighter fluid, you can free up the gummed up lubricants. Just do it carefully.

I've got about twenty of those Minolta cassettes, most came with the QT from eBay (I actually bought the camera just to get the cassettes, then was amazed that the camera actually worked). I use a changing tent and load up all the cassettes at once. Then they last me about a month or so.

Really a fun system to use.
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-18-2016   #21
Nokton48
Registered User
 
Nokton48's Avatar
 
Nokton48 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,072
Yeah I started the "Shooting XX in the Leica" thread. So I'm really interested in getting some of the 7222. I buy my 35mm directly from Eastman in NYC. The shutter in my camera is very "snappy" and the meter seems to work reasonably.

If I get a 16mm carrier for my Omega D2V that might work. Recently I bought a really short focal length Componon that would prolly work too. Might need to go on a a recessed board.

Yep this is plenty fun.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-18-2016   #22
Spanik
Registered User
 
Spanik is offline
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,365
Makes me want to try the Mamiya 16's I have on the shelf.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-18-2016   #23
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
I kinda cheated building the enlarger I mentioned. I already had a Mimiya Enla head so all I had to supply was a lamp housing, bottom board and means to adjust working distance from the (home made) easel. My light source is a small 8W LED bulb that puts out plenty of light. It is about the size of a regular 40W bulb. Still adjusting the lamp housing. Of course the Enla head is for 10 X 14 negatives the Minox fits OK.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-19-2016   #24
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmyjoe View Post
So it uses the 16mm film as well?



Best,
-Tim
Actually the Minox uses 9.2mm wide film for a 8X11mm negative size. I built a slitter that produces two 9.2mm wide strips from the center of 35mm film. I can obtain 6-24 exposure rolls from 1 standard 36 exposure roll of film. So that is about 85 cents per roll from a 36 exp load of Tmax 100. Just for kicks I'd like to shoot some TX in low light and push it 2 stops to 1600, crazy idea for such a small negative but still cheap to experiment with. Right now I'm working my way through a very ancient bulk roll of Pan F, about 10 years expired but stored in the fridge. Results seem nominal to my eye.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-26-2016   #25
Nokton48
Registered User
 
Nokton48's Avatar
 
Nokton48 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,072
Now my Digicam is working again. Here is my Minolta 16 MG:

2016-03-17 16.42.11 by Nokton48, on Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-26-2016   #26
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
Very cool, have you shot anything with it yet?
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-26-2016   #27
Nokton48
Registered User
 
Nokton48's Avatar
 
Nokton48 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,072
Nope not yet. I'll guess I will have to order a roll directly from Eastman in NYC.
How difficult is it to reload the cartridges?
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-26-2016   #28
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
Make sure you get single perf.

Whatever you use to load your 35mm cartridges with 5222 should work fine for the little Minolta cartridges.

I use just a changing bag, and I cut off a length of film. Then measure it out to 18" and use that as my template. Then in the changing bag again, I pull out lengths and cut them to that 18" and spool them up and put them in a solid black 35mm film cassette case (from old rolls of AgfaPan 100). After I've cut as many lengths as I have empty cassettes to fill, I close up the 100' spool, and exchange it for the empty cassettes. I use blue tape to hold the film to the internal spool, and blue tape to tape the cassettes back together again. It's really pretty straight forward.
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-26-2016   #29
Nokton48
Registered User
 
Nokton48's Avatar
 
Nokton48 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,072
I did some internet searching, and I decided to buy a film slitter from Joe McGloin. It cuts the exact size of the original Minolta film, and that's from 35mm stock. So I can use 5222 or whatever else I feel like loading up. That seems like a big advantage to me. I've paid and it's on it's way.

Lots and lots and lots of info here:

http://www.subclub.org/

Specifically on reloading Minolta Cassettes here:

http://www.subclub.org/darkroom/rollmin.htm
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-26-2016   #30
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
I've got 800 feet of 7222 and 7231?? (16mm Plus-X) in the freezer, and it works great in the Minolta, in fact it's what Minolta tells you to use for reloading their cassettes in the instruction manual that came with the cameras.

Good luck with the splitter, I'm sure that will work fine too.

Do you have a battery for your 16MG?
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-26-2016   #31
Nokton48
Registered User
 
Nokton48's Avatar
 
Nokton48 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,072
It has a selenium meter so no battery required for the camera. The flash takes a 15V Eveready 504 to fire AG1 flashbulbs. I bought one twenty years ago and it still pops 'em just perfectly.

The 16MG is extremely small (smaller than the original Minolta I have read). So they were diverging in their models as they got bigger and bigger. The 16MG was a return to the smallness of the early models, yet has some sophistication in terms of features.

Just found the instruction book here:

http://www.butkus.org/chinon/minolta...nolta_16mg.htm
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-27-2016   #32
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
I picked up a 16MG off the auction site a year or so ago, because it had 35 flashbulbs and a couple cassettes, but unfortunately the camera itself didn't work.

That instruction book you linked to has a section on loading 16mm film into the cassettes.

The 16QT that I'm using now has the larger image on the negative. Is the 16MG the same, or does it have an image size the same as the original 16II? The reason I ask is that the original Minolta 16 cameras could use the 16mm double perf film because the image area fell neatly between the top and bottom of the film strip, between the two rows of perforations. With the 16QT and the larger image size, you need to use single perf film because now the image area extends from one edge of the film all the way down to the single row of perfs. So with double perf film, one row of perforations would run right through the image.
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-27-2016   #33
Nokton48
Registered User
 
Nokton48's Avatar
 
Nokton48 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmyjoe View Post
Is the 16MG the same, or does it have an image size the same as the original 16II?
Hmm Not sure about the image size, I need to get a few more things together to start making images with this camera. I think it will be a hoot! The illustrations in the instruction book (I printed it out to read at me leisure) shows double-perfed film. I've read that single-perfed will work (thanks) from several sources. As you can see below, the film I purchased new twenty years ago has no perfs. That is another reason why I just purchased a film slitter, but also, because I have a deep freeze full of all types of 35mm film. The slitter cuts right down the middle of the 35mm stock, producing a strip identical to what was in my cartridges. Whether or not that will make any difference remains to be seen.

2016-03-27 10.26.25 by Nokton48, on Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-27-2016   #34
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
Timmyjoe,
Only the QT and the MGS have the larger negative. The MG has the original 10X14mm negative size. The MGS is quite advanced with faster f2.8 lens but unfortunately fixed focus. Only the QT had focus adjustment with the larger neg. I only wish Minolta had made a 16II with a focusing lens and a 13X17 neg size, that would have been a killer combo. The Russian copy of the Minolta 16 does a focusing lens, to .5 meters, with a 23mm f3.5 specification if I remember right. Of the Russian copies the Kiev 30 is the best one, with a larger frame size and will take Minolta 16 cartridges. It does have a more limited shutter speed range and no 'B' setting. One time I tried to transplant the shutter from a 16II into a Keiv 30 because they are so similar, but there was just enough difference to prevent the transfer.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-27-2016   #35
Nokton48
Registered User
 
Nokton48's Avatar
 
Nokton48 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,072
Great info.

How are you developing your film, scanning, and/or enlarging these negs?

Here is the film slitter that I just bought. I know I could build one, but too many other projects need my attention.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/201542391204...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-27-2016   #36
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
This illustrates the different image sizes from the Minolta 16 cameras.



The top strip is from the 16QT and the bottom strip is from the 16II. All my 16mm film is single perf so there isn't an issue with using it in either camera.

That film slitter should work fine. And I agree, the cameras are fun because I can use them to shoot through all this film I've had stored in the freezer for years.

I have a couple of stainless steel 16mm development reels that I use in my normal development tanks. And use a Coolscan 9000 to scan the negs.
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-27-2016   #37
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
One other thing about the perfs in 16mm motion picture film, they are necessary for the film to be used in motion picture cameras, but are completely useless in the Minolta 16 cameras (unlike 110 cameras). If you have solid/no-perf film in 16mm size, that will work fine.

16mm double perf will work fine in the Minolta 16 cameras with the smaller image size as the perfs fall outside the image area. And single perf 16mm film works fine in both the smaller image size cameras and the larger image size cameras because again, the perfs fall outside the image area. With the larger size image area cameras it's important to load the single perf film so the perfs ride along the side of the cartridge where the plastic bridge is located (that holds the supply side and the take up side of the cartridge together). Otherwise the perfs will be in the image area on the film.
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-27-2016   #38
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
Nokton48,
One item, that you can make, is a 'spinner stick'. It is a wood dowel with a 16mm deep slot cut into one end. I cut the slot with an Xacto razor saw, the wide one. You slip on end of the film into the slot and then, guiding the film along the edges with your thumb and index finger you spin the dowel and roll the film, emulsion side in, into a nice tight roll. Then slip it off the dowel. Don't worry when you slip the film off the dowel about getting finger prints on the film, this part of the film does not have images on it. With a 18 inch length of film you will have about 2.5 inches of start and tail of film to handle it in the darkroom. That is with a 20 exposure load. Single perf 16mm double X works fine (Eastman 7222) I use it all the time and you don't have to slit it. However slit film opens up a lot of really fine films. I'm wanting to try Tmax 100 or Delta 100 for the potential of much finer grain over the double X
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-27-2016   #39
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,444
If you need a developing reel that will adjust to 16mm about the only new tank and reel on the market is the Yankee tank with 1 reel. Many years ago I bought one and all I can say is, it is "adequate", but cheap and fragile feeling. I've bought a couple of older Yankee Master tanks with adjustable reels off that auction site and the older ones don't feel so cheap. I think B&H still has the current Yankee tank in stock.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-27-2016   #40
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,983
The auction site has a variety of 16mm reels from time to time:

Jobo Reel

Stainless Steel Reel

And these are the ones I use:

Stainless Steel Reels for 16mm film

Best,
-Tim
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories & Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:44.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.