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View Poll Results: What kind of meter do you use with your LTM?
Spot Meter 47 16.10%
Incident/Reflected handheld 210 71.92%
incident/reflected camera mounted 41 14.04%
no meter - just guess 49 16.78%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 292. You may not vote on this poll

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How many people use spot meters versus incident/reflected?
Old 01-22-2008   #1
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How many people use spot meters versus incident/reflected?

I'm just curious, given the choices in meters - do you use a spot meter or a reflected/incident meter - and if so - is it mounted on the camera or not?

I guess in Ansel Adams book he advocates for using a spot meter - to use the zone system and/or a gray card effectively.
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Old 01-22-2008   #2
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It depends on what I'm shooting, in what circumstance, and with what camera.

With my view camera and BW film - I use my spot meter 90% of the time.

With MF cameras (usually color neg and slides) I use incident meters 90% of the time.

With 35mm rangefinders (mine are meterless) I use a handheld reflective meter about 60% of the time, and switch it to incident for the other 40% - unless I'm in sunny 16 mode.

This is out in the field anyway. In the studio I use all three, to read different things, and generate exposure based off of all of them.

FWIW - I find that for me, the Zone system really works best if you can adjust development for each individual exposure (+/-N dev). Hard to do with rollfilm, so I don't worry about it as long as my shadows and highlights are within the range I want them for a given film and expected processing.
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Old 01-22-2008   #3
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My incident meter also has a spot attachment that I have, but rarely use. L-318, a small digital meter that takes a single AA battery. Great form factor and very accurate.

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Old 01-22-2008   #4
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I don't use a spot meter versus an reflected/incident light meter. I use it in conjunction with them as appropriate.

I think an incident light meter is often more useful.

If we all knew how to use an incident light meter perfectly, and/or we had the time to think about it, there wouldn't be so many implementations of reflected light meter algorithms.
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Old 01-22-2008   #5
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I am using a spot lately. Biggie but efficient.

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Old 01-22-2008   #6
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Incident most often.
Spot when I'm doing landscapes or architecture.
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Old 01-22-2008   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitxu
I'm more or less like rogue_designer, it all depends what I'm shooting.
I've noticed something strange. Some days I'll meter very carefuly every shot and other days I'll just take a reading when I get out of my car and more or less stick with that, but checking my contact sheets I couldn't tell which method I'd used with which film!...
Exactly my style, too ! Somedays, I meter every single shot (reflective or spot with Hasselblad) and somedays, I meter once and stick with it (small variations). Either way, it seems to work for me.
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Old 01-22-2008   #8
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Incident for slide film, Spot for print film (color or BW). If I am shooting 35mm, I usually use the built in spot meter on my Olympus OM-4T even with slide film, but I use the incident meter or handheld spot meter for my other cameras.
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Old 01-22-2008   #9
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Honestly I do not have time to thinka bout using a spot meter for my shooting. Spot metering is something I would only do with something such as a landscape of some sort. No way in the world could you spot meter a fastly moving and quick paced street life...
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Old 01-22-2008   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbf
Honestly I do not have time to thinka bout using a spot meter for my shooting. Spot metering is something I would only do with something such as a landscape of some sort. No way in the world could you spot meter a fastly moving and quick paced street life...

Its not hard with a camera that has a good built in spot system like the Olympus OM-4. That camera's system is incredibly fast to operate once you learn it. I agree with you if we're talking handheld spot meters, I have one of those too and its only used for tripod mounted cameras shooting landscapes and architecture.

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Old 01-23-2008   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitxu
I've noticed something strange. Some days I'll meter very carefuly every shot and other days I'll just take a reading when I get out of my car and more or less stick with that, but checking my contact sheets I couldn't tell which method I'd used with which film!...
Exactly. And do I know whether I used a 1,5/50 C-Sonnar or 1/50 Noctilux? Or 35/1.4 pre-aspheric Summilux or 35/1.7 Ultron?

Sometimes yes (the coma in the Summilux is a giveaway, for example) but most of the time no, because I'm look at the picture, not the bokeh, the vignetting, or any of the other stuff that the internet-pundit test-chart-shooters care so much about.

I can tell in trannies more often, but with a mono or indeed colour neg, or the M8, there are so many other factors at work that I don't really worry very much.

But to return the the thread, with non-metered Leicas I nomally guess, or use a shoe-mount meter (interpreted as needed); with metered Leicas (surprise!) I use the meter, again interpreted as needed; and with MF and LF I generally use incident for tranny and spot for neg (much less interpretation needed).

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R.
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Old 01-23-2008   #12
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I've always used a spotmeter when I started out with SLR cameras and using slide film. I tried to choose only SLR cameras that had built-in spotmeters, so I favored the Canon SLR's over the Nikon SLR's because the Canon F1N had a spotmeter screen and the T90 had a spotmeter. With the M6, I use the camera meter but may still have as back-up my Pentax Digital Spotmeter with me too.
When I am lazy, I guess the exposure, and usually I get the right exposure.
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Old 01-24-2008   #13
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I never used one until getting the M5, which has sort of a spotty meter. Now I've got the M5 and a T90 and especially with the latter I find myself experimenting around quite a lot with the spot meter, both for visible light photography and flash, and it feels like a quite precise approach to metering.
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Old 01-24-2008   #14
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For years

I depended on the cw/avg in my F2 and Nikkormats. Later in my photo history I learned enough to use them in conjunction with a basic understanding of the zone system. Now I'm into Barnacks, so I guess at it (whaddda disaster at times). If I ABSOLUTELY need to have the pic (replacing digital family documentation or fine art attempts) I'll use a Sekonic seleinium with the incident attachments. I'm a dinosaur, Whaddovit?
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Old 01-25-2008   #15
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I carry a Minolta spotmeter F. An incident meter is not helpful if where you are standing has a different EV than where the subject is standing. If you want incident measurement from the spot meter then just meter a grey card.
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Old 01-30-2008   #16
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I either use a Minolta Autometer or Weston Master V, both in incident mode for serious shooting. Otherwise I either guess or meter off my hand. I've never owned a spot meter.
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Old 01-31-2008   #17
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I'd think a sophisticated spot system like the Olympus OM4 has would be advantageous for digital cameras; on the other hand a histogram display is said to be the ultimate light meter.

A spot meter is useful when you cannot easily put yourself into the same light as the subject, such as various points in an expansive landscape or in theatre photography for example. I got a Pentax Digital Spotmeter for my wife to use when she was doing a a lot of theatre work but never have used it myself. Nor have I found reason to use the spotmeter feature available in a couple of my cameras.

If I'm going to use a hand-held meter, I prefer an incident meter, and just refer to it occasionally, then bias the settings based on experience. But I do respect matrix metering (such as the Bronica RF645 has) built-in, and auto-exposure the main rationale! Useful for fast-changing conditions.
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Old 02-03-2008   #18
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With monochrome and my Leica M4-P I just estimate the exposure. If using reversal film I use a spotmeter. I also have a Weston V, which is fine for incident readings. When using the Weston in reflected light mode I need to take more time to get an effective reading: probably been using the spotmeter too long and become used to its accuracy.
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Old 02-03-2008   #19
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I use the camera's internal meter if I am shooting digital or feeling lazy. When I want full control of my exposure, I tend to shoot with a Sekonic L-358 with the 1-degree spotmeter attachment my wife gave me a few years back. Used it this weekend in fact. Works a treat.

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Old 02-04-2008   #20
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For nearly thirty years I have used a Zove VI modified Pentax Digital Meter. I can't recall ever getting a bad exposure with it; It's dead accurate, and now a bit beat-up. Recently got my new Minolta SR-M body,which has no meter, so I bought a Minolta Autometer from the Rangefinder Classifieds, and a Minolta Auto-Spot 1, on Ebay both of which agree with my Pentax.

With my new M2 I use the sunny-16 guidelines outside, when shooting XX film. Negs are looking -good-.

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Old 02-04-2008   #21
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I use all three types: The spot when the cam is on a tripod and there is lots of contrast, the incident-metering, when the subject is too far from 18% reflection and reflected-light measurements with a bigger angle for anything else.

For the rangefinder-cam its almost exclusvely type 3 (reflected, broad angle) .

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Old 02-11-2008   #22
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Any kind of meter can give great results if used properly, or lousy ones if used poorly. I use all three types, depending upon what I'm doing and what meter I have with me- although I am just as likely to guess my exposure as not, especially when using small format. I probably use incident metering the most, but I generally go to spot metering with landscape work or in weird or contrasty light. I pretty much only use in-camera meters in AE mode on cameras that have this, since it's pretty convenient- otherwise, I prefer a hand-held meter.

I positively hate clip-on meters. I know many folks like them, but I think they ruin a camera's ergonomics, and provide wide area reflective metering, which is far and away my least favorite method of metering- I'd much rather use an incident meter. Ten or fifteen years ago, I was traveling in England when my in-camera meter (the only one I had) died. So I went into a shop and bought an old Russian selenium cell meter for about five pounds. It's the dreaded wide-area reflective type, but it worked just fine, and still does. These days I only carry when it when I'm feeling nostalgic- though once or twice it's come in handy when I've run out of batteries.
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Old 02-11-2008   #23
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I mostly use a Gossen Digisix with its dome...over and over I've compared to my Minolta Flashmeter
(in non-flash mode), also with its dome, and a pair of CLA-d Canon F1...always virtually identical. When using the Canons I meter the back of my hand most often.

IMO one wants to learn to previsualize. I should be able to accurately guess the exposure over there if I know what it is over here...and, for that matter, I should be able to WALK over there, like a humanoid.
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Old 02-11-2008   #24
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...also...the Digisix is almost perfect, way better than anything else I've seen for pocket use...but it wants to give me extra information, like the time, and it wants to wake me up in the morning (must figure out how to shut the damn alarm) and show the temp in my pocket, my choice C or F. Thank goodness it isn't into politics or barometric pressure. Too much monkey business. I like that it weighs nothing and is too light to be damaged if dropped. It burns batts, but they're easy to find and cheap (Radio Shack)...never leave home without a spare, then reset the ei...
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Old 08-06-2012   #25
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Quote:
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...but it wants to give me extra information, like the time, and it wants to wake me up in the morning (must figure out how to shut the damn alarm) and show the temp in my pocket, my choice C or F. Thank goodness it isn't into politics or barometric pressure. Too much monkey business...
Just too funny. But true and I agree with you.

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Old 08-06-2012   #26
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I don't use any metering except when I shoot my R7. I have a Pentax spot meter that's too big so I never carry it with me. If I had a handheld meter I would more certainly use it...

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Old 08-06-2012   #27
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I rarely use a meter, but when I actually do feel the need to use one spot metering is quite helpful.
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Old 08-06-2012   #28
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I use incident mode whenever possible. When not, I use the camera meter, which works fine with some interpretation/correction.
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Old 08-06-2012   #29
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It depends if I am using a Leica M2 or my MP. I usually use an incedent hand held meter unless the camera has a meter. Sometimes if lighting is tricky and I want to save detail in shadows I will get in close for couple of reflected light reading on something specific hoping to also keep hightlight detail. I got into this habit back when I was shooting a lot of color landscapes with a ISO 50 or 100 Velvia or Ektachrome VS. Although then I was using a spot meter. - Jim
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Old 08-06-2012   #30
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I use whatever is on the camera if it's center weighted or spot, otherwise incident for snapshots and 1% spot for when I want to be 100% sure or in difficult lighting.

Spontaneous shots aside, I never leave it entirely up to guesswork even when I'm fairly confident. Film is too expensive these days to blow a shot every now and then just out of laziness.
Then again, that's just the practical side of me trying in vain to make up for all the money I spend on gear
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Old 08-06-2012   #31
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With the view camera usually an incident, but sometimes a spot meter. With everything else the meter in the camera- except for the 0Serie- then I guess.
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Old 08-07-2012   #32
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Just started using a Weston Ranger 9 with my non-metered cameras...the meter along with a Zone System scale on it is making B&W shooting so much easier...and the results speak for themselves...
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Old 08-07-2012   #33
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Using a digital spotmeter has not failed me in 30 years of photography. It allows me to calibrate the exposure from multiple readings.
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Old 08-08-2012   #34
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I used to have a spotmeter that looked like a bansai'ed ray gun. too damn big to lug around. but what it taught me was to guestimate an extra
zone or two beyond what my center-weighted meter told me (e.g., a bit darker in the shadows than the center-weighted told me, and same for the highlights).
so i ditched the spot meter and use the in-camera CW'ed averaging meter, and now learning to use the Gossen DigiSix.
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Old 08-08-2012   #35
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How many actually know what they're doing? How many recognize the simple fact that with practice, you can get good exposures with just about any form of metering, however unsuitable (think incident for B+W with long brightness ranges)? And how many are saved by the inherent latitude of negative films, especially for overexposure?

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Old 08-09-2012   #36
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How many actually know what they're doing? How many recognize the simple fact that with practice, you can get good exposures with just about any form of metering, however unsuitable (think incident for B+W with long brightness ranges)? And how many are saved by the inherent latitude of negative films, especially for overexposure?

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... and how many are aware of the latitude of negative film to overexposure and consciously choose to use it that way?
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Old 08-09-2012   #37
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I have the semi-spot attachment for my Gossen Lunasix F, but I have rarely used it. In my view, if you meter enough spots, you have basically performed a manual averaging metering.

I use incident metering for almost everything, if I use a handheld meter. I still shoot a lot of slides, so that's how I've gotten into the habit. I meter for the highlights, and I almost always carry a flash to fill in the shadows - to get them into the film's range.

I have been familiar with my Nikon F3's meter pattern for 25 years, so I can rely upon it almost without fail. Lately, I have migrated to using a Nikon F2 with DP-11 prism, and the slides look fine also. People may pooh-pooh the center weighted metering on these cameras, but for the large majority of photographic situations, they work just fine. With the F3 in auto mode, I can keep up with fast moving subjects, or mottled lighting.

I'm still learning the meter pattern on my Leica M7. It seems to be a big spot pattern. It needs more exposure lock than what I've needed to use with my Nikon F3. For a fill flash lover, the TTL modes of the F3 and M7 are great.
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Old 08-13-2012   #38
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I'm a big fan of incident metering and use it whenever I can, and it makes sense. Incident metering *usually* makes sense, but not always. I use handheld incident meters for 35mm up to 8x10.

I also have one of those little shoe-mount CV meters, so if I'm travelling light, that's what gets used.

A little bit of intelligent thought behind ANY meter reading is always a fine idea.
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Old 08-13-2012   #39
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With my Canon-P and fed II, I use a Sekonic L-208. My Pentax SLRs have built in meters.
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Old 08-13-2012   #40
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I tend to prefer incident light metering, when I use a hand held meter.
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