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Frank Jackson on Street Photography I am happy and excited to announce a new RFF forum on Street Photography mentored by Frank Jackson, one of the best producers of analog B/W prints I have ever seen. His shows include the Open Shutter Gallery, Heriard-Cimino Gallery, and Ogden Museum of Southern Art. His images are in the collections of Smithsonian Ogden Museum of Southern Art, California Afro American Museum and Xavier University New Orleans LA. He has worked for or has been featured with Visa Card, Xerox, UCLA, Eric Owen Moss, Architect, Hasselblad Forum (cover),Gordon Parks, Muhammed Ali, Million Man March Wash. DC, Lionel Hampton, jazz legion photographer , 1995-2002, Stevie Wonder, B+W Magazine (British version) twice, Rangefinder Magazine, Dahon Bicycles, Arelli Wheels, Real Product Design, Automobile Club of Southern California. Frank's online images are at fotographz.500px.com and fotographzfrankjackson.tumblr.com . "While on this diverse photographic journey…I have to say during this whole time my love for fine art black and white photography kept growing. I always found time to shoot in different cities and my own personal work…this has sustained me through some very tough times. As of 2012, with the help of a very good friend I maintain a state-of-the-art dream darkroom. The darkroom helps greatly in the on-going practice of understanding “the light”, being able to process film and print drives me to keep my digital photography “organic”. I’m curious visually and shooting what’s, what on the street feeds this curiosity. Everyday I walk out my front door to “see” the world with a digital camera, a film camera, the “cup” and an open mind (mostly).

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Who has the authority to critique your street photography?
Old 02-22-2015   #1
Hsg
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Who has the authority to critique your street photography?

On the internet forums its common to come across photographers who argue that street photography has no rules , everyone should follow their 'vision' and all street photography are 'good' because they document life.

On the opposite side is those who approach photography through the vision of an authority figure, an experienced photographer with certain achievements in the field of street photography who's paid through workshops to critique the work of others.

Magnum photographers are the authority figure for most street photographers. Through Magnum workshops many street photographers get their work critiqued. In the following link, Costa Manos, a veteran of magnum photos critiques the work of one of his students.

Watch the video and discuses if you agree with such an approach to street photography, namely by trying to become 'better' by the critique of an authority figure.

Constantine Manos : Critique for Karl Edwards
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Old 02-22-2015   #2
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IMO, its not just street photography that has no rules. Any art is subjective, and the best anyone can do is to explain why they like something or not.

It is up to history and academia to determine what art works are significant.

It is up to dealers and galleries to determine what art can be profitable to them.
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Old 02-22-2015   #3
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Started watching the video, but the sound and presentation was so bad I gave up after a couple of minutes. What I did see and what I could hear left me singularly unimpressed - just me again I suspect - pity!
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Old 02-22-2015   #4
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I'm very lucky that I have a circle of friends include artists and photographers. One of those was one of my professors from college who is retired now and was the head of the photography program for 25 years and a couple of others that are still teaching. We get together every quarter and have critiques of each others work. We look at each others portfolios and have really solid conversations about the work. Pretty much resembles the weekly crits. we had in college.

The things that I think will make anyone better is to learn all you can about art and photography. Go to museums and look at paintings and sculpture. Learn about the history of art and photography. If you love visual arts this should be easy.

I think you can get much better through critique. You just have to be careful that you are listening to people that are about the same place on the journey as you are father along. You want to be careful you keep growing vertically and not just horizontally.
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Old 02-22-2015   #5
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Here is another video where Eric Kim who has a following in the social media gets some harsh feedback from Costa Manos.

Costa Manos Critique of Eric Kim
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Old 02-22-2015   #6
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I watched the video. Thanks for sharing.
But I don't think it contains a critique as the word 'critique' is often used.

I see an almost gentle subjective preference from the teacher on his student's work. And he's mostly talking about the visual aspects of the photos (what makes an image interesting and to what degree), which I fully agree that Street photography is not immune to those.

And we see this all the time here on RFF. It's just from time to time we see some comments that are delivered in a condescending tone, that is neither helpful nor it is well-meant (except probably from the giver's own very narrow definition of well-meaning). Even only a handful of these could drown out the constructive critiques. As one proverb says, it only takes one drop of ink to render a bowl of good milk useless.

As an aside, I love the photos being critiqued in the video, I think those are excellent examples of Street photography in color.

So to answer your question, Hsg, I am on the side where there is no authority figure, singular nor organizational. There are degrees of mastery, and there are masters (those who are gifted by both talent and resources to set a high standard).

Some of these masters are also good teachers who aims to share their knowledge and experience (I would be glad to attend workshops or gallery from one of them given the chance) and some of them won't be as generous.

But I believe you have as much right to criticize my photos as I do yours. And the goal is not to say "Your photo sucks" or "I'm swooning", the goal is to start a conversation (just as it is in this video) in which both of us may learn something. Sometimes this happens, other times not.
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Old 02-22-2015   #7
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When I was about 12 one of my friends' fathers said to me "Listen to what they have to say, then do what you think is right." Personally, I'm willing to listen to anyone's criticism, but that doesn't mean that I will feel the need to follow their advice. When someone acts as if he is beyond criticism, that in itself is a warning sign that he's probably BS.
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Old 02-22-2015   #8
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Ok let's try this. I'll put myself out there. I prefer to post one of my own for a couple of reason. First and foremost I don't feel comfortable posting someone else's work for this purpose and two I know why I took it. Not that I think this is anything spectacular but i do think it works on several levels. I will first talk some about it and include some of the critique that was given. I showed this in out last session.



What caught my eye is when she was starting to walk by I noticed all the stripes. (repeating shapes) and the the guys watching her. I waited until she got to an interesting point in the frame and I took the image.

So what makes this work for me is she is young and from the side she is hold the jacket you don't know if she is yet a woman. The guys looking and the reflection clearly shows that she is. Then you see the advertising poster that in the window that is what advertisers show as the perfect woman. So it I think it works on a visual level with all the repeating shapes (the stripes which are everywhere) and it starts to say a little bit about who we are as a society. Now whether it has any real merit I will leave to the others.

So let's hear your views. Like, hate whatever. HAVE AT IT...
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Old 02-22-2015   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowfox View Post
I watched the video. Thanks for sharing.
But I don't think it contains a critique as the word 'critique' is often used.

I see an almost gentle subjective preference from the teacher on his student's work. And he's mostly talking about the visual aspects of the photos (what makes an image interesting and to what degree), which I fully agree that Street photography is not immune to those.

And we see this all the time here on RFF. It's just from time to time we see some comments that are delivered in a condescending tone, that is neither helpful nor it is well-meant (except probably from the giver's own very narrow definition of well-meaning). Even only a handful of these could drown out the constructive critiques. As one proverb says, it only takes one drop of ink to render a bowl of good milk useless.

As an aside, I love the photos being critiqued in the video, I think those are excellent examples of Street photography in color.

So to answer your question, Hsg, I am on the side where there is no authority figure, singular nor organizational. There are degrees of mastery, and there are masters (those who are gifted by both talent and resources to set a high standard).

Some of these masters are also good teachers who aims to share their knowledge and experience (I would be glad to attend workshops or gallery from one of them given the chance) and some of them won't be as generous.

But I believe you have as much right to criticize my photos as I do yours. And the goal is not to say "Your photo sucks" or "I'm swooning", the goal is to start a conversation (just as it is in this video) in which both of us may learn something. Sometimes this happens, other times not.
Except for the statement that I highlighted (in my own well-meaning way), I agree.
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Old 02-22-2015   #10
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Experienced photographers are always interesting to listen to, because they know what works and what does not, and also, they have a formed vision and style, therefore through their critique, you can have an insight how a mature "artist" or if you prefer professional, is reasoning.
To all those who say, that history is junk, and only your "original" and "new" vision counts, I say to be more humble and learn from others first - this will save you several hundred years of time....
Then, once you will know what's going on in your creative process, you will be able to look for your own way forward.


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Old 02-22-2015   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mfogiel View Post
Experienced photographers are always interesting to listen to, because they know what works and what does not, and also, they have a formed vision and style, therefore through their critique, you can have an insight how a mature "artist" or if you prefer professional, is reasoning.
To all those who say, that history is junk, and only your "original" and "new" vision counts, I say to be more humble and learn from others first - this will save you several hundred years of time....
Then, once you will know what's going on in your creative process, you will be able to look for your own way forward.
Agree so nobody wants to talk about the work. Come on..Agree with me disagree and mfogiel would you want to talk some about the image that you posted? I would be interested in hearing your thoughts....
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That is some photograph!
Old 02-22-2015   #12
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That is some photograph!

Quote:
Originally Posted by airfrogusmc View Post
Ok let's try this. I'll put myself out there. I prefer to post one of my own for a couple of reason. First and foremost I don't feel comfortable posting someone else's work for this purpose and two I know why I took it. Not that I think this is anything spectacular but i do think it works on several levels. I will first talk some about it and include some of the critique that was given. I showed this in out last session.



What caught my eye is when she was starting to walk by I noticed all the stripes. (repeating shapes) and the the guys watching her. I waited until she got to an interesting point in the frame and I took the image.

So what makes this work for me is she is young and from the side she is hold the jacket you don't know if she is yet a woman. The guys looking and the reflection clearly shows that she is. Then you see the advertising poster that in the window that is what advertisers show as the perfect woman. So it I think it works on a visual level with all the repeating shapes (the stripes which are everywhere) and it starts to say a little bit about who we are as a society. Now whether it has any real merit I will leave to the others.

So let's hear your views. Like, hate whatever. HAVE AT IT...
It's a good photograph on so many counts.
You summarise the situation well - I assume you did see the potential here before you took the shot!
I consider this to be 'extra- ordinary' street photography. You would be hard pressed to get anything quite like this again however hard you tried, and that to my mind places it out of the 'ordinary'.
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Old 02-22-2015   #13
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Is this morphing into a critique thread? If so, I have something to say.

One of the things I find lacking in a lot of street photographer is that the intellectual statement often pushes out the visual [visual: composition, balance, dynamics, etc], to the point where there's often no visual tickle at all. My personal belief and approach is that photography is first and foremost visual, and so, fundamentally, the visual needs to be respected, dealt with, and utilized, as an underlying requirement. Beyond that, you can go ahead and have your philosophical statement.

This is the reason, IMO, for the strength of HCB's work, and its durability. When I started as a news photographer, I went into it with that attitude, that every photo not only had to tell the story, but also be a visual experience. Anyone who wants to see what I did with that idea can look at my 35mm Flickr stuff, linked below, where there's a selection of my old news stuff (distilled version here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/mdarnt...7628767257187/ )

You can argue that this isn't a requirement, but doing it earned me awards every year, and got a lot of wire service attention and international distribution; unusual, considering that I was working on a very small town paper with less than 15,000 circulation and never promoted myself at all (my editor was entering me in contests--I just wasn't interested). Given a choice, I think people will prefer content + vision to only content.

In my opinion, too many street photographers get wrapped up in the situation and what it means to them, and nearly entirely forget the fundamentals of formal photography, ending up with half of a picture, something inadequate no matter how good the subject matter is-----merely snapshots of interesting things.

OK, I should just shut up, now....
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Old 02-22-2015   #14
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I do agree that visuals are first and foremast and what certainly stimulates me to start to look if there is a possible photograph. I think great photographs work on many levels that start with visuals first and then the more you look the more meaning they reveal. And then how does each piece fit into a larger whole. A body of work. I say when someone asks about critiques why not show how one works. Or not it is after all the world wide web LOL...

Some philosophies I tend to follow for my work and tend to look for in others though I am not locked into any of this. I have found every time I get rigid with what I think is an absolte I find something that changes my mind but here is a base I tend to start from.
"What reinforces the content of a photograph is the sense of rhythm – the relationship between shapes and values." - Henri Cartier-Bresson

"To me, photography is the simultaneous recognition, in a fraction of a second, of the significance of an event, as well as of a precise organisation of forms which give that event its proper expression."-Henry Cartier-Bresson

"....content cannot be separated from form. By form, I mean the rigorous organisation of the interplay of surfaces, lines and values. It is in this organisation alone that our conceptions and emotions become concrete and communicable. In photography, visual organisation can stem only from a developed instinct." - Henri Cartier-Bresson
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Old 02-22-2015   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jesse1dog View Post
It's a good photograph on so many counts.
You summarise the situation well - I assume you did see the potential here before you took the shot!
I consider this to be 'extra- ordinary' street photography. You would be hard pressed to get anything quite like this again however hard you tried, and that to my mind places it out of the 'ordinary'.
Thanks and I also wanted to point to one of the negative comments that the reflection of the girl is to close to the edge. I agree but it is in the moment and you have a fraction of a second to respond. I did wait till she moved into the empty space so the guys could be seen and that was literally a fraction of a second.
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Old 02-22-2015   #16
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Very interesting.

Very helpful!

Thanks for sharing.
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Old 02-22-2015   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airfrogusmc View Post
So what makes this work for me is she is young and from the side she is hold the jacket you don't know if she is yet a woman. The guys looking and the reflection clearly shows that she is. Then you see the advertising poster that in the window that is what advertisers show as the perfect woman. So it I think it works on a visual level with all the repeating shapes (the stripes which are everywhere) and it starts to say a little bit about who we are as a society. Now whether it has any real merit I will leave to the others.
I always hesitate to provide input into these types of threads because it usually turns into a pointless debate, but here goes... No hate, just honest opinion. The things that work for you are the very things that don't work for me. The stripes on the girl and on the storefront make this for one very busy scene. If the stripes on the storefront were somehow blurred (very shallow DOF or some other technique), it would be an improvement.

IMO, one of the things that makes an image interesting to me is a single point of 'focus (pun intended)' or several components that work together as a whole yet not make the entire composition appear busy.

As a side note, the men are not looking at your subject but at someone else.
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Old 02-22-2015   #18
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Thanks Keith. I tend to see patterns, leading lines, repeating shapes and other things like that and I tend to see in triangular composition so indeed my work might not be in your favor. And thats ok. The very reason I pushed the shutter are the negatives to some. LoL....

Great that we all don't see and work the same way but the guys in the reflection were looking at her. It's more apparent on a large print. Thanks so much for the input Keith. Always good to hear opposing views. I also agree that if it were a portrait of just her it would be to busy.
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Old 02-22-2015   #19
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So let's hear your views. Like, hate whatever. HAVE AT IT...
As a viewer, I see nothing in this photo that is even mildly interesting. I see 'a very simple shot' where the subject was passing and the photo was taken without any regard for form or beauty.

There is a gaping dead space behind the subject, which draws my eyes and yet there is nothing there. The subject has a sullen face, she seems bored, and she's walking in front of a store. The reflections and so on are very weak and one has to look really hard to see them but even then they neither add to the form nor the beauty of the photo.

A very simple and boring shot that the likes of it are all over the internet and anyone can take.
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Old 02-22-2015   #20
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And you certainly have the right to your opinion.
But those things I mentioned are there and whether they are important to you or not is what makes us all different and is a very good thing.

And if the guys looking at her and the stripes (repeating shapes) weren't behind her you might very well have a valid point.
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Old 02-22-2015   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airfrogusmc View Post
Ok let's try this. I'll put myself out there. I prefer to post one of my own for a couple of reason. First and foremost I don't feel comfortable posting someone else's work for this purpose and two I know why I took it. Not that I think this is anything spectacular but i do think it works on several levels. I will first talk some about it and include some of the critique that was given. I showed this in out last session.



What caught my eye is when she was starting to walk by I noticed all the stripes. (repeating shapes) and the the guys watching her. I waited until she got to an interesting point in the frame and I took the image.

So what makes this work for me is she is young and from the side she is hold the jacket you don't know if she is yet a woman. The guys looking and the reflection clearly shows that she is. Then you see the advertising poster that in the window that is what advertisers show as the perfect woman. So it I think it works on a visual level with all the repeating shapes (the stripes which are everywhere) and it starts to say a little bit about who we are as a society. Now whether it has any real merit I will leave to the others.

So let's hear your views. Like, hate whatever. HAVE AT IT...
That's one wonderful image - I agree with Jesse, that is excellent, multiple layers and visually compelling elements.

A practical question - how close were you to the young lady? Unless that was a long lens, you were right on top of her. She did not notice you taking the photo? Most people, especially girls, start to twitch when a camera is anywhere in the vicinity.

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Old 02-22-2015   #22
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That's one wonderful image - I agree with Jesse, that is excellent, multiple layers and visually compelling elements.

A practical question - how close were you to the young lady? Unless that was a long lens, you were right on top of her. She did not notice you taking the photo? Most people, especially girls, start to twitch when a camera is anywhere in the vicinity.

Randy
Hi Randy and thanks. I shoot street and have for a couple year exclusively with a Leica M M and a 35mm lens so she was close. I'm a big guy but I have focus pre set (DoF scales) and I'm shooting with a small camera. I was walking in the opposite direction as she was and started to see it unfold. Didn't frame until the very last moment. I don't think she ever noticed. I was so lucky that I kept her reflection when I really quickly framed the shot. As I said earlier I wish that I had little more but I'll take what I have. Without the reflection, for me, there is no photograph.
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Old 02-22-2015   #23
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Originally Posted by airfrogusmc View Post
And you certainly have the right to your opinion.
But those things I mentioned are there and whether they are important to you or not is what makes us all different and is a very good thing.

And if the guys looking at her and the stripes (repeating shapes) weren't behind her you might very well have a valid point.
Here is a photo by me that I have posted here before and you can critique, but there is nothing to critique, because neither the picture nor I are saying that there is anything 'going on' in the photo that is special, its just a simple photo... Its just that I personally find it 'visually' interesting, that's all.

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Old 02-22-2015   #24
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I'm really interested in what mfogiel has to say. I am waiting to comment till I hear his thoughts.
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Old 02-22-2015   #25
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HSG I like the mood and the guy in the light and everyone else is in dark. Wish the highlights on the bag weren't completely blown but are probably in the file and would show nicely in a print. Also not sure about him being dead center. Seem to hold my attention and I don't move around the frame. I like the dark shape of the girl on the far left framing the shot on that side. The car on the right seems to point back in the frame though you might want to bring the brightness on it down some. Everyones moving in the same direction and maybe just one person going against the grain (the other direction) might take it to another level. Could also mean everyone is conforming which might be aporpriate for the location.

What do you find visually interesting in the shot? What is working for you and what, if anything, isn't?
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Old 02-22-2015   #26
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That's one wonderful image - I agree with Jesse, that is excellent, multiple layers and visually compelling elements.

A practical question - how close were you to the young lady? Unless that was a long lens, you were right on top of her. She did not notice you taking the photo? Most people, especially girls, start to twitch when a camera is anywhere in the vicinity.

Randy
I love how the critiques of this photo have ranged so far. And while I do think that is a testament to the nature of subjectivity, I get tired of people harping on the subject (maybe because I used to do it all the time).

In someways, if you continue to say "it's all subjective!" then you're ignoring the very interesting and deep tradition of visual composition. Not to say that you all do this, just something to watch out for.

Regarding Airfrog's image, when it first struck my eye, I really didn't think much of it. What hurts it the most for me is the advertisement of the woman's face stacked on top of the main subject's head.

I think the most important thing you've got going in this photo is the relationship between the three subjects - The girl, her reflection to the left and the guy's reflection to the right. I love the power of three's (something I think we all share - ie - not "subjective" :-)) and if you could give me a shot without that advertisement and those three subjects in there, then I would like it a lot more.

The other elements airfrog mentions - the relationship of the stripes, the relationship of the beauty of the advertisement, the jacket being held... I couldn't get past some of those earlier items to look/think that far into it.
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Old 02-22-2015   #27
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Thanks JChrome,
To me and the reason I think it so important (the advertising) is the little girl in her, bow in her hair and the part of her more mature shape being hidden by the jacket, the ad represents the preconceived idea of beauty to young girls and then the reality, her reality, is the reflection. And then the big thing getting lost is how it fits with other images form this particular body of work.
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Old 02-22-2015   #28
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What do you find visually interesting in the shot? What is working for you and what, if anything, isn't?
The 'visual' appeal of that photo is useless if it cannot be repeated, so here is the same image with two more simple photos - but, they look visually similar. IMO one has to have something going in the photos that is beyond words - something purely visual.





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Old 02-22-2015   #29
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Agree for me and many it starts with those elements that Bresson talks about and then really good work goes beyond that. Work that one gets immediate gratification form usually only working on one level. You look you see you get andf nothing to go back to look at agin. No need to. But good work is work that has layers and usually works on multiple levels and keeps you coming back because it unfolds slowly and the more you look the more you see. Work like that has staying power.

So tell me what those elements are that are in the image I asked about and those elements you speak about and what is missing if anything. And ultimately it is about bodies of work. A good photographer is not made by making one good image just as a baseball player with one good at bat makes the hall of fame. It's about consistent bodies of work
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Old 02-22-2015   #30
robbeiflex
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The 'visual' appeal of that photo is useless if it cannot be repeated, so here is the same image with two more simple photos - but, they look visually similar. IMO one has to have something going in the photos that is beyond words - something purely visual.
That looks suspiciously like Toronto signage (2nd shot). For me the 2nd one is by far stronger than the others visually, regardless of the reminder of my home town which I left long ago. Better light, better exposure and the composition is much stronger as it draws and keeps the eye in the centre of the photo. Just my 2 cents worth.
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Old 02-22-2015   #31
Hsg
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I have no authority figure that I follow, I used to but not any more. In fact as I posted in one thread, for me the shoot is the fun part and photos, I don't really care much about them.

So to answer my own question, I don't mind anyone to offer critique of my photographs because in my own view there is nothing to critique in them. They're simple photos that say nothing and don't make any assumptions on the viewer.

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Old 02-22-2015   #32
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HSG,

Here ares ome very basic things and I certainly don't agree with all of it but it is a good resource and might hold some answers? Some of it is right on the money.
http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2...t-photography/

http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2...n-1-triangles/

http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2...leading-lines/

http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2...ure-to-ground/

http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2...n-3-diagonals/

http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2...t-photography/

http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2...t-photography/

Just some stuff that might help?
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Old 02-22-2015   #33
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But you should have some opinion of your own work? Why does it appeal to you. There has to be a reason. What are those elements that strike you or moved you to take the photograph?
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Old 02-22-2015   #34
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I’m a bit of an aberration in that I don’t seek critique despite its instructive value. For one thing, this is a hobby, something from which I hope to derive fun and enjoyment. I’m competitive enough with myself, and I still find ways to learn from the “masters,” even if not in a directly personal way. If I start to add other voices, I’ll become consumed by even the most thoughtful criticism, militating against the fun.

Do I need a ‘thicker skin?’ Maybe. Am I going to get one. Nope.

But it’s more complex than just avoiding any bruised egos. How and what I choose to photograph is my decision, and irrespective of any aforementioned insecurities, I’m confident in my aesthetic discretion, at least within a certain degree of fluctuation.

That is, for example, I’ll question why I posted certain photos just weeks or even days after uploading them to my site. Evolving always, but appreciating the present, that’s all I can really do.

To be sure, and I’m only speaking for myself, compliments are always welcome, but ultimately, the drive and incentive must come from within.

Now, all of this said, while some transcendent coterie determining what qualifies as quality or art does not exists, the issue is not so relative, at least for me, that an invitation for critique would be all inclusive. Opinion it might all be, but informed and inline with certain aesthetic expectations and direction would be important.
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Old 02-22-2015   #35
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Thanks JChrome,
To me and the reason I think it so important (the advertising) is the little girl in her, bow in her hair and the part of her more mature shape being hidden by the jacket, the ad represents the preconceived idea of beauty to young girls and then the reality, her reality, is the reflection. And then the big thing getting lost is how it fits with other images form this particular body of work.
Fair enough. But before I dive deep enough to come to those conclusions, the first thing it needs to do (for me) is be visually pleasing. You may want the advertisement to be above her head because it creates this notion of the ideal woman in her mind. But visually, it doesn't work for me.

If I understand you right, I suppose the question becomes "Should you compromise the visual appeal to enhance some sort of philosophical/psychological meaning?"

I know when I shoot street, I only aim for visually pleasing compositions that come out of the chaos. Any sort of deeper meaning is just icing on the cake. I don't shoot street to convey to people something philosophical.

That said, I do have a project which is specific and is in the street and is using strangers as subjects. I am trying to convey something philosophical in this work, but I don't consider it "street photography". I am striving towards something else, completely different than my street work.

The other issue at play here is our ego and our ability to "covet" our own work. The below image is my favorite from a recent trip to India. I've posted it elsewhere on this forum. No one ever gave it any roaring applause on here (someone said my series was nice). But I keep coming back to it and it still shines to me. My own critique:

It could be a bit sharper (a bit of hand shake)
The spacing could be better.
Not sure if I like the mirror to the left so close to the edge of the frame.

What do you guys think?

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Old 02-22-2015   #36
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And that is cool. I think it creates the tip of a triangle forming a classic triangular composition if just speaking about visuals. But thats me.
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Old 02-22-2015   #37
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I find it interesting. I do like the two mirror reflections though I find the one on the left to be slightly distracting. There is a nice upside down triangle comp. I think the guy moving in the from left is a strong element. give a real sense of place. Thats my 2 cents. Take it for what it's worth and I don't find a sharpness issue. Might fit nicely into a larger body of work.
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Old 02-22-2015   #38
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@airfrogusmc
Re: your shot

I find your photograph interesting, although on its own not very powerful. My personal preference would be to cut away a piece of the stripes on the right, to lighten their impact and draw the attention to the center-left of the image, where the more important things are happening. I disagree with the comments, that the photo is weak, and the reflections not strong enough, etc. There is an interesting aesthetics, and that on its own can be sufficient for someone to write a cheque for over 4 million USD, like in case of Rhine II, which as a stand alone photograph is worth as much as the printing paper it has been made on. On a more personal note - I dislike the digital look of your photos, but this is my personal thing. I like Jazz and usually am bored by pop music as well.

My shot is just a street photo with no particular acrobatic-geometric effects or historic importance. It is interesting for me, because I am concerned with the individual, her/his problems and thought processes, and a handsome candid moment of solitary reflection is good enough for me to press the shutter. This was shot in Cannes - was this girl French or maybe Russian? Was she texting with her Monaco boyfriend, or was she upset, because her brother was on the Ukrainian front? Only she knows, like only YOU know what is going on in your head now. Not everybody needs to be Cartier-Bresson or Constantine Manos, who BTW for me is one of the best colour photographers I know about.
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Old 02-22-2015   #39
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What do you guys think?
interesting scene.
would have been good to have the old ladys face in focus, and if you dropped on one knee to take the image so that the barbers legs were in the frame and the whole lounge where the other is sleeping...filling in the top third of the frame....still a nice image.
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Old 02-22-2015   #40
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I do think that crits on the world wide web are sometimes not that helpful Usually they get into pissing matches and personal matters that have little to do with the work. I am not saying that's happening here. It hasn't so far. But live critiques with people that are about the same place on the journey or even ahead of you are for me anyway invaluable.

I was in a large one man exhibit in 2013 35 prints and the folks i crit with regularly were so helpful in helping me edit the work down to the 35 for the show. I had an image selected to be in a juried show last summer in New York at the Soho Gallery only 42 out of 2600 images were selected and they helped me so much in getting the edit down for that and they and the curators at the gallery my show this March is at were so instrumental in getting me to the final images. So getting the right feedback can be so important in helping you grow. Not sure the world wide web is the best setting for that. I might change my mind if this thread keeps moving in the right direction.
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