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GW690 what do you use to meter?
Old 05-02-2017   #1
partitura
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GW690 what do you use to meter?

I've recently purchased a lovely GW690III and am shooting my first roll in it. Right now I'm metering with my digital camera, which seems a bit cumbersome. What I'd really like to do is spot meter and use the zone system, since I would like to shoot more velvia or provia on it. But lugging around a separate spot meter would also be cumbersome...

The Voigtlander VCII meter looks small and could attach to the shoe, but it has a 30 degree angle of view -- not exactly a spot meter!

What do you use for metering in this kind of situation?
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Old 05-02-2017   #2
aizan
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but incident meters are better for shooting slides than any kind of reflective meter.
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Old 05-02-2017   #3
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The GW690 can be a bit of a confusing machine. Handles like a just larger 35mm but the format would lend to a slower and methodical approach.

I initially had a Minolta IIIF with a 10º Spot, but didn't warm to it for the same reason you note. (I put it up on sale in a local classified but nothing). Later on I found a Sekonic 308 for quite a low price and grabbed it.
Very very nice rather compact incident meter. Its reflective mode may be 40º out of memory but I don't quite get the grip of where it points exactly.

The iPhone meter app is rather usable, but I didn't bother to test extensively, so far rather accurate. It accounts for a partial spot meter.
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Old 05-02-2017   #4
Huss
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I use the Voigtlander meter. It's the only option if you want a meter on the camera.
No issues. And if you need a spot reading, take one off the back of your hand in the same light.
I pretty much use Sunny F16 anyway, even with Velvia. Just gauge the scene. No issues.

The one thing about the GW690III is it's the only camera, that no matter how careful I am, occasionally fat rolls me. A serious bummer when you open the back and see that. And I've tried all the tricks to prevent this.
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Old 05-02-2017   #5
Spanik
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aizan View Post
but incident meters are better for shooting slides than any kind of reflective meter.
I agree with that. Hardly use anything else than incident and more than 80% of what I use is slides. Spot only when I have no possibility to get into the same light or something like stained glass windows. I don't see the point in lugging around a 6x9 and put slide in it and then object that the lightmeter is a bit on the large side.
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Old 05-02-2017   #6
Chubberino
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Yeah the iPhone meter app I use works great as you can put in the film size and focal length and max aperture in a saved slot and it'll spot meter pretty well.

The fat spool is definitely and issue but I also run into this with my RF645 as well so I just hope for the best.

I think I may get the Voigtlander shoe meter though as I have a few cameras without a built in light meter so having the option to use it on multiple setups is intrguing
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Old 05-02-2017   #7
Kent
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With this one:


Or this one:


Or, more often, this one:


Or, even more often, that one:


But, to be honest, mostly with this one:
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Old 05-02-2017   #8
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Sekonic Flashmate L-308 for incident readings. If not I'll just use my eyes.
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Old 05-02-2017   #9
MadsJaeger
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I use either the VC meter on the 690 or the LS308 handheld. Both work fine
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Old 05-02-2017   #10
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Just use an app... I use the same one as Kent; works fine.
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Old 05-03-2017   #11
narsuitus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by partitura View Post
What do you use for metering in this kind of situation?
I often use a Gossen Super Pilot incident/reflected light meter to determine the correct exposure for my medium format cameras that do not have built-in light meters.


Light Meters by Narsuitus, on Flickr
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Old 05-03-2017   #12
narsuitus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by partitura View Post
Right now I'm metering with my digital camera, which seems a bit cumbersome.
For my medium format rangefinder cameras that do not have a built-in light meter, I sometimes use a compact digital camera to determine the correct exposure and to conduct test shots.


Film Rangefinder & Digital Compact by Narsuitus, on Flickr
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Old 05-03-2017   #13
Sarcophilus Harrisii
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aizan View Post
but incident meters are better for shooting slides than any kind of reflective meter.
Incident meters can be great for exposing transparency reliably and easily but whether they are best depends a bit on what you have to meter, where it is and whether you want to read across the whole light range of the image and how specifically.

Simple and obvious example: if you're visiting a zoo and standing at the fence of the lion enclosure in full sun, an incident meter will not be better than any kind of reflective meter for getting a good exposure reading of the cat lying in deep shadows on the far side of the enclosure. If you still think an incident meter is the best option in that scenario, then I'm inclined to think you're considerably faster and more agile than myself, and with a far better developed sense of self-preservation to boot.
Cheers,
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Old 05-03-2017   #14
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With the few cameras without built-in light meter I have, I use a Gossen handheld meter:
http://www.gossen-photo.de/english/foto_p_digipro.php

I can highly recommend it. I get excellent results with it, with reversal/slide and negative film.

Cheers, Jan
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Old 05-03-2017   #15
waileong
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Why would you use a spot meter to shoot slides? Very inconvenient.

An incident meter is much preferred.
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Old 05-03-2017   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waileong View Post
Why would you use a spot meter to shoot slides? Very inconvenient.

An incident meter is much preferred.
See the remark of Sacrophilus above. But otherwise, yes, incident it is.
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Old 05-03-2017   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarcophilus Harrisii View Post
Incident meters can be great for exposing transparency reliably and easily but whether they are best depends a bit on what you have to meter, where it is and whether you want to read across the whole light range of the image and how specifically.

Simple and obvious example: if you're visiting a zoo and standing at the fence of the lion enclosure in full sun, an incident meter will not be better than any kind of reflective meter for getting a good exposure reading of the cat lying in deep shadows on the far side of the enclosure. If you still think an incident meter is the best option in that scenario, then I'm inclined to think you're considerably faster and more agile than myself, and with a far better developed sense of self-preservation to boot.
Cheers,
Brett
hehe.
An incident meter on a selfie-stick maybe?
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Old 05-04-2017   #18
partitura
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Thanks so much for everyone's suggestions. I'll be using this camera quite a bit for distant subjects when traveling, and I'm not sure about using an incident meter in those situations. I should experiment!
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Old 05-04-2017   #19
waileong
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Originally Posted by Spanik View Post
See the remark of Sacrophilus above. But otherwise, yes, incident it is.
Find an equivalent shade to use the incident meter in.

Although I would personally not shoot slide film under such circumstances as there's no sunlight for gorgeous contrast.

See example below for light and shadow using 100F on GW690III

https://www.flickr.com/photos/797982...posted-public/
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Old 05-04-2017   #20
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A very distant subject. But one has to assume the same light falls on it as it does on one.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/797982...posted-public/
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Old 05-04-2017   #21
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I use a spotmeter for slides.

My spotmeter has a "highlight" and a "shadow" button. I normally meter a highlight and hit the highlight button. I usually take some other readings for comparison, as well. I do this mainly with medium format cameras that don't have a good built-in meter.

I use an incident meter for portraiture, sometimes even resorting to a flat disc diffuser.

I think it depends on what you're used to, because any kind of metering will work if you use it correctly. I've been shooting slides since 1972, and I learned to expose accurately with the then-state-of-the-art TTL averaging metering in my first SLR. When I used compact RFs for travel, I used the same metering techniques I had used with the SLRs, resulting in perfectly exposed slides. When I shoot 35mm today, I still use the averaging meters built into my older cameras.

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