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Agfa Safety Film - Any Suggestions ?
Old 12-21-2016   #1
do.cu.me.nt
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Agfa Safety Film - Any Suggestions ?



I received this from a University professor who knew I was into photography and like him at first I had no idea what this was. After doing some research all signs point to it being a 50 ISO safety film and like most of this style there are no perforations for loading into standard 35mm cameras and although I was able to carefully load it into an Nikon FM2 I need better options for this one. As well as some advice with developing ideas.
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Old 12-21-2016   #2
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Copex Pan microfilm. Probably 32 ISO at the best of times (approximately 20-30 years ago, I don't think they had that packaging beyond the early nineties at the very latest), when used for high contrast microfiches...

As there is enough of it for experiments, you should go by trial-and-error - using microfilm for pictorial results was difficult even when fresh, and the age will add another 50% variability to any number involved...
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Old 12-21-2016   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevo View Post
Copex Pan microfilm. Probably 32 ISO at the best of times (approximately 20-30 years ago, I don't think they had that packaging beyond the early nineties at the very latest), when used for high contrast microfiches...

As there is enough of it for experiments, you should go by trial-and-error - using microfilm for pictorial results was difficult even when fresh, and the age will add another 50% variability to any number involved...
If you can track any down, the various tips-and-tricks for developing Kodak's High Contrast Copy, Tech Pan, or their Kodalith films for pictorial results would be a decent place to start the Trial-and-Terror experiments.
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Old 12-21-2016   #4
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Thanks to the both of you for the prompt responses. Definitely gonna search what you suggested Dwig. And hanks Sevo regarding the ISO being lower. I was noticing it was hard to search as 50 and when I used 32 it got a bit easier to find out about it.
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Old 12-21-2016   #5
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Safety Film is a label found on most films until maybe 20 yrs ago when the label was dropped. It means the film will not explode or catch fire. The first plastic-based films were made of Nitrocellulose, a material that became extremely flammable and would even spontaneously ignite as it aged. In the 1940s, safer materials were created for film bases, and for decades films were then labeled as "Safety Film."
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Thx
Old 12-23-2016   #6
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Thx

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
Safety Film is a label found on most films until maybe 20 yrs ago when the label was dropped. It means the film will not explode or catch fire. The first plastic-based films were made of Nitrocellulose, a material that became extremely flammable and would even spontaneously ignite as it aged. In the 1940s, safer materials were created for film bases, and for decades films were then labeled as "Safety Film."
Thanks yea that party I figured as much after watching Inglorious *******s!



Thanks All!
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Old 01-04-2017   #7
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Thanks for the all the responses and I have put together a film project with friends to help me shoot this film. I had a friends process the film with D76 Kodak and he assures me the results are looking good although I have yet to see them. Thanks again for all the help and if I get em scanned I will share some the results here.
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Old 01-04-2017   #8
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You might also look for advice in the Vintage Film Shooters group on Facebook, where you will find a wealth of knowledge that may take some of the "error" out of your "trial and error".
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