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Old 03-09-2016   #41
mdwsta4
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I'd probably recommend the X100T or an X-Pro 1 to test the waters. I love the x100t and it's one of the best cameras I've owned, but if you want interchangeable lenses, there are killer deals on XP1's right now both new and used.
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Old 03-09-2016   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsrockit View Post
Please explain why the RX100 V4 is remotely what the OP is looking for... and how is Fuji NOT lighter, smaller, and less expensive than Leica?
Well. the RX100 Mk4 is lighter, is smaller and is cheaper than Leica.
...and, off the top of my head, i don't believe there is a Fuji system that is lighter, smaller and cheaper than the RX100 Mk4 and that can do what that Sony does.
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Old 03-10-2016   #43
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I've just received an X-Pro2. I previously failed to bond with a Panasonic GX7, largely due to the evf. In my acquaintance so far the XP2 is a very nice camera to use and the OFF with focus block bottom right if you want to check focus point or manual focus works really well - woth glasses.

I've never had a fuji before, skipping the XP1, but picked up the 18/2, 27/2.8 and 35/2 lenses from a friend
The 35/2 work brilliantly, quiet and fast as and good in hand - this is my favourite focal length. The others focus pretty quickly, but are a bit noisy compared to what I am used to (manual focus rf glass!)

Overall, very pleased and I think will be a perfect complement to the rfs when I want to carry on the bike or just want an alternative.

Plus, silent electronic shutter and evf is good for telephotos at children's concerts.

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Old 03-10-2016   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shawn View Post
Here is the XP2 ERF mode...



That is with the EVF square being the lower zoomed in view. You can also have focus peaking active in that square. If you are in monochrome mode (ACROS IS NICE) that square is monochrome so the red focus peaking will really jump out. You can focus basically by watching for red in that corner.

You can also have the digital rangefinder function in that corner but that one is harder to see at that size.

BTW, you can also have it show the full captured view to check overall focus and framing.



The XP2 framelines are more accurate than the XP1.

The ERF mode works in manual focus and single point AF. It also works fine with adapted lenses.

Shawn
That looks MARVELOUS.
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Old 03-10-2016   #45
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Save you cash and get an XE1. Don't waste your money on anything else.

None of the fuji cameras are anything close to shooting with an M. Both in the hands and the image results. After a short time you will lust to make your M9.
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Old 03-10-2016   #46
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I also would recommend the X100T to test the system and finder-feeling. Also the camera is a joy to use. If that is good for you but you need interchangeable lenses, you can switch to the X-Pro 2. For just testing, the X100T can be found for very reasonable prices currently, as everybody seems to anticipate the X200 or whatever it will be called.
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Old 03-10-2016   #47
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All of the Fujifilm X series APS-C sensors can be operated in a minimalistic, manual-mode fashion. It takes a while to figure out exactly how to implement this mode of operation. Once you do, usage is quick (no shutter lag) and reliable. I recommend operating the AF manually. This is quite similar to the RF experience where one focuses using the center of the finder and then recomposes. The focus is achieved one of three ways in manual focus mode:
  1. Turn the lens collar by hand (focus by wire)
  2. Use a shutter half press to initiate AF
  3. Use the AFL/AEL button on the back of the camera to initiate AF

With the these methods the focus won't change unless you take action by using above actions. The EVF/OVF focusing aids are available in all modes. The EVF/OVF focusing aids are a function age as the XE-1 and X-Pro 1 CPU speeds limit more sophisticated firmware. Also these older models do not have on-sensor phase-detection AF regions.

With EVF focusing it is possible to move the focus point away from the center of the frame. I rarely do this.

I suggest the X100T as it has a quicker CPU and more focusing modes. The downside is the teleconverters make the camera larger. I enjoy suning the OVF very much.

Otherwise the XE-2 is worth the extra money since the recent firmware update. I don't recommend the XE-1 since its slower CPU can not support the newer focusing aids.

Most of the time I use method 2 or 3 with the X-T1 or X100T. I let the camera find the focus region in the somewhere in center of the PDAF regions. This works well for 23 to 35 mm (APS-C) fields-of-view.
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Old 03-10-2016   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mabelsound View Post
That looks MARVELOUS.
It is. On the XP1 my preference is the OVF. I like to use my Nikon and Minolta glass on the X Pro 1 but either had to shoot hyperfocal or with the EVF to focus them.

One of the big things I was looking forward to on the XP2 was the ERF mode and it does exactly what I had hoped for. I can now use adapted lenses with the OVF and still be able to focus them. XP2 is very unique in that regard.

It also has a bunch of little changes from the XP1 that makes shooting nicer.

And as all review state... it is *fast*. So far the AF-C tracking looks like it could replace my D700 for fast action shots.

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Old 03-11-2016   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shawn View Post
...

And as all review state... it is *fast*. So far the AF-C tracking looks like it could replace my D700 for fast action shots.

Shawn
The advent of phase-detection AF regions and more powerful CPUs has significantly increased the Fujifilm's utility for action photography. It's good to hear the X-Pro 2 continues this trend.
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Old 03-11-2016   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shawn View Post
....One of the big things I was looking forward to on the XP2 was the ERF mode and it does exactly what I had hoped for. I can now use adapted lenses with the OVF and still be able to focus them. XP2 is very unique in that regard....
Shawn, so you're framing with the OVF and focusing with the ERF, right? Sorry, not familiar with this technology. At first it looked gimmicky and possibly distracting, but I'm not so sure now. I love the X-Pro1 OVF and the fact that it's uncluttered.

What is the focus point in the ERF? The parallax-corrected rectangle?

John
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Old 03-11-2016   #51
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Originally Posted by ruby.monkey View Post
(Having said that, you might look at the X100T with the two conversion lenses as a truly minimal kit)
This.

It is what I use alongside film and digital Ms.
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Old 03-11-2016   #52
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Originally Posted by willie_901 View Post
The advent of phase-detection AF regions and more powerful CPUs has significantly increased the Fujifilm's utility for action photography. It's good to hear the X-Pro 2 continues this trend.
These are playing around the first full day with the Fuj and part of a longer sequencei...







Shawn
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Old 03-11-2016   #53
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that's...very cute
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Old 03-11-2016   #54
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Originally Posted by johnwolf View Post
Shawn, so you're framing with the OVF and focusing with the ERF, right? Sorry, not familiar with this technology. At first it looked gimmicky and possibly distracting, but I'm not so sure now. I love the X-Pro1 OVF and the fact that it's uncluttered.

What is the focus point in the ERF? The parallax-corrected rectangle?

John
John,

ERF (electronic range finder mode) is the combined mode of the OVF with the small EVF window in the corner. Using that mode you can frame with the OVF and focus/frame with the EVF in the corner. That corner EVF can be the full image frame, zoomed in frame (at two different magnification levels). You can also use the focus aids of focus peaking or the digital split image in that small window as well.

When you are using the zoomed in window down there it is displaying what is in the focus point. So if you move the focus point that view follows. With adapted lens the square in the OVF and the zoomed in view don't quite match due to parallax error.

It is not gimmicky, it lets you frame and focus any adapter MF lens without having to rely on the full EVF. And you can of course turn the ERF mode off and use either the OVF or EVF.

Shawn
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Old 03-11-2016   #55
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I've got an M9 and just added an XPro2. It's very very good. Fast, light, importantly for me good viewfinder and effective manual focus - looking forward to my M adaptor arriving next week.

Some quick snaps from last night and this evening - all from sooc jpeg's on acros setting. All at high iso with DR200% setting.

This one used face and auto eye detection - takes over from focus point



Walking to the car - iso3200 DR200% f2 auto shutter, -2/3EV, central focus point










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Old 03-11-2016   #56
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Further, with the Fuji I have an issue with all of the options and settings available. I long for the simplicity of the M bodies. I'm no Luddite---in my job I work with computers daily and am considered to be a 'power user' by my peers. In your words you want "something that will get out of my way as much as possible". In my experience that is not how I would describe using a Fuji X camera.
This could be said of almost any digital camera. Like, I suspect, most users, I quickly found the option set that works best for me, and now the only time I use the menu is to format the SD card. I have an X-T1 and an X100T and I find that they do get out of my way as much as possible.
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Old 03-11-2016   #57
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about the x-pro2, face detection only works in evf mode, right?

and is there an iso setting that lets you change the iso with the front or rear dial?
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Old 03-11-2016   #58
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about the x-pro2, face detection only works in evf mode, right?

and is there an iso setting that lets you change the iso with the front or rear dial?

I think face detection works only with evf. That suits me, as I prefer the ovf, the key reason I fell out with you gx7 was evf only I think, but prefer to use a single af point for that. The evf though is relatively good for what they are and it's a moments thought to switch and enable face detection with 'auto eye selection'!

Not sure about the iso control. May be possible, but I've not.found it.by accident or.looked.yet. I tend to set any camera up as simply as possible and the iso dial in the Shutter speed.dial is fine for - like my zeiss ikon, which it also resembles in weight.

As someone else said, it's not the same as an M9 or rf, but the ovf is nice, the Brightlingsea pretty accurate (better than m9), the manual focus 'erf' patch clever and effective and it feels fast (again unlike the m9, where the Shutter record makes it feel slower than it really is).

Overall, it's a different camera and with its own lenses, primarily an af camera, but it can be set up to work simply and the ovf is my preferred way of.seeing the world. It's a very good complement, and the evf is useful for someone like me who only occasionally uses longer lenses (plus my m lenses are 1.5 times cropped so I can use them and not buy more)

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Old 03-12-2016   #59
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Originally Posted by ruby.monkey View Post
This could be said of almost any digital camera. Like, I suspect, most users, I quickly found the option set that works best for me, and now the only time I use the menu is to format the SD card. I have an X-T1 and an X100T and I find that they do get out of my way as much as possible.
Don't know about the X-T1 but on the XP2 you can format without going into the menus. Hold down the trash button for at least three seconds and press the rear command dial will bring up the format options.

With all the customizable buttons on the XP2 I have almost everything mapped to a button for direct access. The Q menu is also customizable and you can create a MyMenu page by adding items from all the other menus into it. When you have the MyMenu page created the camera opens that page up when you go into the menus.

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Old 03-12-2016   #60
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Originally Posted by aizan View Post
about the x-pro2, face detection only works in evf mode, right?

and is there an iso setting that lets you change the iso with the front or rear dial?
Face detect is full EVF or LCD only.

You can't directly change the ISO with front or rear dial, it is top dial only. You can map the three different auto ISO settings to a button to let you select between them and also adjust them there. You could use that as an ISO setting by setting Max ISO really high, setting minimum shutter as low as possible then just adjust the default ISO as desired for your actual ISO. But that is a few more button pushes.

Shawn
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Old 03-12-2016   #61
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However, for me the APS-C 1.5 crop sensor is a monster.
Depending upon what lenses you are adapting you can make that go away. A Lens Turbo II is a focal reducer that will basically negate the crop factor. It essentially focuses the full frame image the lens is throwing down to the APS-C sized sensor. That also increases the amount of light hitting the sensor. I am waiting for mine to arrive for my Nikon glass.

I don't think this can be done for Leica glass though.

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Old 03-12-2016   #62
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Depending upon what lenses you are adapting you can make that go away. A Lens Turbo II is a focal reducer that will basically negate the crop factor. It essentially focuses the full frame image the lens is throwing down to the APS-C sized sensor. That also increases the amount of light hitting the sensor. I am waiting for mine to arrive for my Nikon glass.

I don't think this can be done for Leica glass though.

Shawn
No, but I've still got some.Canon Fd glass that can be focal reduced
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Old 03-16-2016   #63
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I'll add another vote for the X100T and the two conversion lenses. Small, has all the manual controls you want with a possible minus for the manual focusing. Lovely little camera.
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Old 03-30-2016   #64
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My X100T stands in for my M240 when I'm worried about where I am going. It is much smaller than my wifes X pro 1.
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Old 04-07-2016   #65
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Thanks for all the advice.

Pulled the trigger on a used XE-2 and an 18/2 off everyone's favorite auction site.

Went and fondled the Fujis at B&H and gravitated to the XE-2 over the other options. The sales guy there was a Leica user and big fan of the XE-2 and started sharing personal photos of shots taken with it off his iPhone.

Will probably just take the XE-2 and 18/2 to Peru to keep things as small and light as possible as I'll be hiking a lot and want something I can keep handy in a small pouch.

Not being a zoom person, I figured didn't want to get used to something else new. Might pick up the 35/2 in addition but not sure how much use I'll have for a 50mm equivalent on this trip. Maybe down the line if I click with the camera.

Thanks for all the advice and opinions.
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Old 04-08-2016   #66
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Thanks for the update. Here's wishing you a wonderful time in Peru.
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Old 04-14-2016   #67
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I would advise you to purchase a camera with an EVF only.
As mentioned earlier in this thread, the OVF's really don't work that well. You never know exactly what the camera is focused on. This is my experience, both the X100S/X100T and X-Pro1 that I've had has been primarily used in EVF mode. All these OVF+EVF focus assist and all the OVF assists just doesn't work that well... I also have an M240, and the OVF of the Fuji's are nothing like the experience of using an OVF on the M240.

I have an M240 and an X-T1 now. If I decide to upgrade the Fuji, it will be for the X-T2. I have no interest in the X-Pro2 mainly due to the small size of the EVF, and the extra expense of an OVF that is more of a gimmick for my use.

As for lenses: 14mm f/2.8, 23mm f/1.4 and 56mm f/1.2 is a great trio. Add a 55-200mm on top of that and you have a relatively light-weight and compact kit with great glass and good reach for every scenario. The 35mm f/2 WR is also compact and nice, but it doesn't have any "magic" like the 35mm f/1.4 in my opinion.

Of course, you can't expect the same rendering from any of these Fuji lenses compared to Leica lenses. I've tried to convince myself that the 23mm f/1.4 renders well enough for my needs compared to my Summilux 35mm f/1.4 FLE on the M240... But the Leica lens has soul in its rendering, while the Fuji renders comparatively sterile images. Also, the FF vs Crop issue is very apparent if you're talking about DoF differences. See this website for a comparison of the 23mm f/1.4 vs a 35mm f/1.4 on full frame. The difference is quite big: http://andrewvanbeek.com/fuji-x-lenses-and-full-frame/

Also a comparison of the 85mm f/1.2 on FF vs the 56mm f/1.2 on Fuji: http://andrewvanbeek.com/fuji-vs-canon-lenses/
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Old 04-15-2016   #68
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Originally Posted by borge View Post
I would advise you to purchase a camera with an EVF only.
As mentioned earlier in this thread, the OVF's really don't work that well. You never know exactly what the camera is focused on. This is my experience, both the X100S/X100T and X-Pro1 that I've had has been primarily used in EVF mode.
This is true when you are dealing with wide open apertures, but not really the case on a sunny day.
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Old 04-15-2016   #69
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Originally Posted by borge View Post
...
As mentioned earlier in this thread, the OVF's really don't work that well. You never know exactly what the camera is focused on. This is my experience, both the X100S/X100T and X-Pro1 that I've had has been primarily used in EVF mode. All these OVF+EVF focus assist and all the OVF assists just doesn't work that well...
Actually I find the Fujifilm electronic RF window as described by mablesound in post #44 of this thread works very well. When the AF system signals focus is found and locked, a quick glance at the ERF window shows the actual focus object(s). With the phase-detection focus regions, once AF is locked on, those objects are always in focus. I know exactly what I'm focused on.

For critical focus I can choose from spit image, focus peaking or simple visual inspection in the ERF window. And I can rotate the lens barrel to fine tune the focus by hand. Of course this is slower than relying on AF confirmation. But isn't critical focusing always slow? The beauty of the hybrid OVF/EVF system is one can use the most appropriate method for the circumstances at hand.

I do not believe Fujifilm's virtual ERF solution is equal to using a properly calibrated mechanical RF-lens system. The analog experience is more organic. I only contend with some practice, the ERF enables one to know identify exactly what the objects were chosen by the AF system. I use Fujifilm OVF/EVF cameras because they enable me to work as if I was using a mechanical RF-lens system
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Old 04-15-2016   #70
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"Combine that w/ a 18f2 and 35f2 and u got your 28/50 combo"

Agree....


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Old 04-15-2016   #71
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Just reading the viewfinder stuff leaves me confused.

Fortunately I got an XE-2 so only have electronic option.

My 18/2 is coming soon. What's the easiest way to set the camera up to get going?

All the focusing options seem super confusing. Thinking just shoot aperture priority or full manual with auto focus and leave it at that.

And if I can swing it I think the 35/2 is probably in my not too distant future.
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Old 04-16-2016   #72
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PM me.

I will offer some links to AF info on other forums.
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Old 04-16-2016   #73
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I would advise you to purchase a camera with an EVF only.
As mentioned earlier in this thread, the OVF's really don't work that well. You never know exactly what the camera is focused on.
I disagree with that. I primarily used the OVF for my XP1 and do so with the XP2 as well.

For the XP1 turn on the focus distance scale in the display. That will tell you the distance the camera focused at. It becomes very easy to estimate where the camera focus was and of course you can set the camera to show the picture right after you take it to double check.

Same thing with the XP2 with the additional benefit of having the ERF mode, which is brilliant.

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Old 04-16-2016   #74
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Originally Posted by ramosa View Post
I don't think you'll find a Fuji that you "can use manually like the m9." Same goes for Sony and others. That's what special about the Leica. Few controls and easy to use manually. Fuji's approach certainly has another benefits, though.
The X-T1 is the closest to M9 and M8 imo, also the X100 (S, T) can certainly be used manually. The X-T1 has furthermore a dial to change the ISO. It doesn't get any closer than that. The only feature Fuji can't compete with is the manual focusing, which lets Fuji looks stunted.
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Old 04-16-2016   #75
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I disagree with that. I primarily used the OVF for my XP1 and do so with the XP2 as well.

For the XP1 turn on the focus distance scale in the display. That will tell you the distance the camera focused at. It becomes very easy to estimate where the camera focus was and of course you can set the camera to show the picture right after you take it to double check.

Same thing with the XP2 with the additional benefit of having the ERF mode, which is brilliant.

Shawn
The problem with the ERF is that you have to take your eye of your subject. Unlike traditional rangefinder patches or split-prism focusing screens, where the focusing aid is in the center of the viewfinder, not hidden away in the bottom-right corner. A focusing aid doesn't belong outside the frame. Sorry, but the ERF is a joke compared to normal manual focusing systems.

Also, again, the focusing scale is in the bottom of the frame. Again - forcing you to take your eyes of your subject to check focus. This is not necessary with rangefinder patches or split prism screens where the focusing aid is in the middle of the frame - where it belongs! How many moments do you want to lose because you have to take your eyes off your subject to check your focusing aid?

Listen, I love my Fujis, and I've had most of them. I also bought one of the first X-Pro1's in Europe, along with the 35 and 18 lens, all on firmware 1.00. But they are best used as pure autofocusing cameras, and this is where the EVF performs by far the best, both in terms of focusing speed, accuracy and accurate preview of the focus. As you probably are aware, ALL Fuji cameras, including the X100T and X-Pro2 focus both slower and more in-accurately when the OVF is used.
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Old 04-16-2016   #76
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"The problem with the ERF is that you have to take your eye of your subject."

You are talking about a fraction of a second, and not even that if you are using the magnified focus box and focus peaking. Just looking for red in that box is all it takes, I can see that with peripheral vision.

"Sorry, but the ERF is a joke compared to normal manual focusing systems."

Your opinion, mine differs. I find the ERF faster than a normal manual focus system, esp. a rangefinder in the center of the field of view. Focus and recompose takes longer than, at most, just flicking your eye to the focus box and back. To say nothing about a subject close in at wide aperture with a lens that has some field curvature to it...

"Also, again, the focusing scale is in the bottom of the frame. Again - forcing you to take your eyes of your subject to check focus. This is not necessary with rangefinder patches or split prism screens where the focusing aid is in the middle of the frame - where it belongs!"

Focus and recompose is slower than just looking at a patch on the side of the viewfinder showing a focus point that can be anywhere within the entire field of view.

" As you probably are aware, ALL Fuji cameras, including the X100T and X-Pro2 focus both slower and more in-accurately when the OVF is used."

That is not my experience.

Shawn
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Old 04-19-2016   #77
nightfly
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Just playing with the new (to me) X-E2 and it appears that you can't set ISO with the little control wheel on the back, which seems like the most obvious place for it. Is this really the case?

Any tips on how people set up their cameras for best quick street/travel use with the least interface with the menus?
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Old 04-19-2016   #78
pechelman
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few options;

set one of the custom function keys to bring up the iso menu and then change ISO with the popup menu

set ISO to auto and let it do whatever it needs to do. You can set custom settings (C1, C2, C3, etc) in the Q menu that will also have different auto ISO ranges if you'd like to have a little bit more control for different types of shooting.

Press the Q button and then use the thumb wheel while highlighting ISO to change sensitivity
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Old 04-19-2016   #79
nightfly
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Nice. That top plate function button works nicely for this.

Thanks.
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Old 07-27-2016   #80
dee
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Phewww - mind blowing !

I have just put together a new X-Pro 1 body and new 27 f2.8 which at £308 is at the top of my budget post retirement .

Back in the day , I used an inheritance to pretend affluence with a Leica M8 , due to it's analogue style interface , spoiling it somewhat with a budget CV 35 f2.5 .
I love using it in monochrome but the X-Pro 1 deal was just too tempting to pass up .
It will by necessity , be a one lens camera , but the nom 41mm is perfect for me .

However , the complexity indicated in this , and other posts makes me wonder if a pedestrian CSC with the typical kit zoom may have been a better choice !
But I love the OVF plus the handling and size suit me - reminiscent of a Yeshica Electro 35 back in the day .

Hopefully I can sort out some simplistic settings for a once in a lifetime family trip to Malaysia .

Of course , all of the choices indicated are way above my budget - and I am not going to sell the M8 .

Respect .

dee
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