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From Leica M to Sony A7s - comparison of user experience
Old 11-28-2014   #1
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From Leica M to Sony A7s - comparison of user experience

Hi All

I'm seriously thinking of getting a Sony A7s to use alongside my Leica M9, and possibly to replace the M9.

I know that different people are different, but I'm hoping that some of you who have used both cameras (or systems) can help me decide if I'll enjoy using the Sony A7s.

First some background: I've used film cameras for 40 years, and pretty much only non-digital Leica Ms and Hasselblads for the last 30 years.

About 3 years ago I started thinking seriously about "going digital" and I bought a Sony NEX-5n to use with the Leica M lenses that I already owned. I HATED IT! The user experience with NEX-5n was so unlike the film-Leica. Changing the simplest parameter involved going into menus, and somehow the camera never really did what I wanted it to do. I got a headache using it, and after 3 months I sold it. I don't think I took one picture with the NEX-5n that I liked.

Therefore I bit the bullet and bought an M9. Picking it up and using it was like the M4-P and M3 that I was used to for years (except with built-in light meter). The menu is simple and I pretty much never use it except to wipe the SD card clean or turn lens coding on/off.

While I like the M9, it is very very dim up here in Denmark in the winter and I want the Sony A7s for its extraordinary light sensitivity and to use some adapted telephoto lenses (two areas where the M9 is not so capable).

However, my NEX-5n experience makes me afraid. Will I have the same visceral rejection of the A7s? Or has the user interface and experience improved a lot since the NEX-5n. How is the A7s with manual aperture and shutter speed and ISO (like I shoot the M9: I choose an ISO, I choose an aperture, I meter, I set a shutter speed). Can these parameters be quickly set without going into any menus?

I have read the A7s manual, but it doesn't really answer my questions. There is no place to rent an A7s near me, so your help and advice will be greatly appreciated.

THANKS!
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Old 11-28-2014   #2
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If you can't rent in Köpenhamn, there's always the bridge to The Best Country In The World™

http://www.cyberphoto.se/faq/foretag...hp?article=A7s

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Old 11-28-2014   #3
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You mean the bridge from the Bridge film series?:-)
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Old 11-28-2014   #4
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curious about the answers of people who have used both cameras!
just a note: when I read that you hated the use of the NEX5N I was expecting that this must be because of the different viewfinder and focusing experience. Using manual lenses I set aperture on lens and use A mode with Auto ISO, or S mode with Auto ISO. ISO change and exposure compensation are assigned to dedicated buttons, in S mode the wheel sets the shutter speed. You may need more settings, I don't and therefore never need to dive into the menu which I also detest.
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Old 11-28-2014   #5
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Quote:
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If you can't rent in Köpenhamn, there's always the bridge to The Best Country In The World™

http://www.cyberphoto.se/faq/foretag...hp?article=A7s

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Yes, but can I pay in BEER?

But seriously, thanks for the information. 610 SEK per month is not expensive at all. I'll look into it.
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Old 11-28-2014   #6
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sleepyhead,
I have recently bought the A7S. I haven't got a digital M, but do have an M3 and IIIF as well as a Hasselblad. Until recently, most of my digital cameras have been Nikon, but I have switched to Olympus and now Sony. I can answer that it is possible to use the A7S fully manually without a huge struggle with menus. I use it with Zeiss ZM lenses and focus manually. It is slower for me to focus than a Leica rangefinder because I find I have to use the magnifier to be certain of focus, but it is very reliable that way in terms of making sure you are focused before you shoot. I love being able to use all of my rangefinder and SLR lenses on the one full-frame camera, and that it has a totally silent shutter. I bought the A7S one day before going on a holiday to Bhutan and didn't regret it. Pictures here: http://members.iinet.net.au/~fingon/...14/bhutan.html
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Old 11-28-2014   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcfingon View Post
sleepyhead,
I have recently bought the A7S. I haven't got a digital M, but do have an M3 and IIIF as well as a Hasselblad. Until recently, most of my digital cameras have been Nikon, but I have switched to Olympus and now Sony. I can answer that it is possible to use the A7S fully manually without a huge struggle with menus. I use it with Zeiss ZM lenses and focus manually. It is slower for me to focus than a Leica rangefinder because I find I have to use the magnifier to be certain of focus, but it is very reliable that way in terms of making sure you are focused before you shoot. I love being able to use all of my rangefinder and SLR lenses on the one full-frame camera, and that it has a totally silent shutter. I bought the A7S one day before going on a holiday to Bhutan and didn't regret it. Pictures here: http://members.iinet.net.au/~fingon/...14/bhutan.html
mcfingon, thank you for this encouraging information, and for your lovely pictures from Bhutan (seems to be a magical place).

I should have mentioned in my original post that besides a pocket digital point-and-shoot I've never used a digital camera except the NEX-5n and the Leica M9.

With a 35mm or 50mm f/2 lens, can one focus quickly with the A7s using only focus peaking (i.e., no magnification)?
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Old 11-28-2014   #8
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Not in my experience. Maybe it's worse with the Sonnar 50/1.5 that is my favourite lens, but I was missing too many critical focusses. I found focus peaking misleading in that it would say things were in focus that weren't and also intrusive in the picture to have red bits of light showing up in various spots.
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Old 11-28-2014   #9
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Since the M9 seems to have sensor issues, it is a good idea to get a SONY as a second camera anyways. I am so far using the M8 and the M9, with occasionally letting them "rest" while I use M 4/3 cameras. Getting a 10X magnification with the EP cameras for focusing allows me to set focus on eye lashes in full detail for taking portraits. All images come out incredibly sharp.
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Old 11-28-2014   #10
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Quote:
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Since the M9 seems to have sensor issues, it is a good idea to get a SONY as a second camera anyways. I am so far using the M8 and the M9, with occasionally letting them "rest" while I use M 4/3 cameras.
Hi Raid, I've read all about the M9 sensor issues of late. I'm not particularly concerned. I've never cleaned my sensor with anything but an occasional rocket blower. Nothing lasts forever. I prefer to use things I enjoy and not worry.

I plan to keep the M9 until I see what the M11 (or whatever the successor of the M240 is called) looks like. I feel the ISO sensitivity gain of the M240 is not enough over the M9 to justify the switch.
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Old 11-28-2014   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcfingon View Post
Not in my experience. Maybe it's worse with the Sonnar 50/1.5 that is my favourite lens, but I was missing too many critical focusses. I found focus peaking misleading in that it would say things were in focus that weren't and also intrusive in the picture to have red bits of light showing up in various spots.
That was my experience with focus peaking on the NEX-5n as well. Stuff would glow red but in the photo the focus wasn't exactly where I wanted it to be.

I wonder if focus peaking on the Leica M240 is better than the A7s in this regard?
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Old 11-28-2014   #12
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I used an A7 for 3 months while my M9 was having a sensor transplant at Solms. To me, it was just another digital camera, if you see what I mean. It takes nice pictures but that's about it. It looks like a digital camera, it has buttons all over the place without any thought about ergonomics. It's too light, not well balanced, and everything feels like plastic, even the metal parts. It has no uncompressed raw, and the compressed raw is lossy. It's impossible to get the sensor to produce the starbursts that I got so easily with the Leica. As soon as I got back my M9, I sold it, sold the A7, and bought the M240, despite being very angry with Leica. There's nothing like the M in terms of user experience and enjoyment of the photographic process, even with all their technical flaws.
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Old 11-28-2014   #13
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Oh, regarding focus peaking, I personally find it next to useless. It is much better to turn it off, and rely on image magnification for critical focus. On the M, it is more precise than the A7, in that it will only appear on very tiny parts of the image that are really sharp, and sometimes with wide aperture lenses, will not show at all, even when the image is in focus. On the A7, peaking would appear on high contrast objects that are not in focus, especially in the background. Anyhow I have it turned off on the M too.
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Old 11-28-2014   #14
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I've learned to love my Sony A7r. It doesn't have the emotional appeal of the M9 (that I owned at one time), but it's a hell of a camera capable of awesome quality. Speaking of any Leica M or a Sony A7 series camera... you can't go wrong with either.
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Old 11-28-2014   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcfingon View Post
sleepyhead,
I have recently bought the A7S. I haven't got a digital M, but do have an M3 and IIIF as well as a Hasselblad. Until recently, most of my digital cameras have been Nikon, but I have switched to Olympus and now Sony. I can answer that it is possible to use the A7S fully manually without a huge struggle with menus. I use it with Zeiss ZM lenses and focus manually. It is slower for me to focus than a Leica rangefinder because I find I have to use the magnifier to be certain of focus, but it is very reliable that way in terms of making sure you are focused before you shoot. I love being able to use all of my rangefinder and SLR lenses on the one full-frame camera, and that it has a totally silent shutter. I bought the A7S one day before going on a holiday to Bhutan and didn't regret it. Pictures here: http://members.iinet.net.au/~fingon/...14/bhutan.html
Awesome motorcycle trip and excellent photos!
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Old 11-28-2014   #16
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I shot with an M8 and M9 for several years and also own a Nex 7. I tried the A7. Actually, I tried it twice, thinking perhaps I missed something the first time around. Sent it back both times.

If you hated the 5n, it's hard to see how you would enjoy the 7S. If anything, the A7 series cameras are more like DSLRs than RFs. They could not be a more different user experience than a film or digital M.

My two main dislikes of the A7 were handling and output. Overall the camera felt clunky and unrefined, very unlike the simple, graceful handling of an M. I shoot B&W mainly, and the monochrome output of the A7 just did not have the same beautiful qualities as that from the M8 or M9. But I understand the A7S, with its larger pixels, renders B&W very differently, and the samples I've seen look pretty good. I see you use film for B&W, so maybe this isn't an issue.

Of course, ISO is another matter. If you need it, you need it.

Instead of the A7, I went to an X-Pro. It has an OVF and more of an RF feel than any other digital camera I've owned. And X-Trans B&W output offers the most natural, least digital look of any camera I've owned. And high ISO performance is excellent. But I use it mainly with Fuji lenses. If I were using my digital camera with Leica lenses, I would likely prefer the A7S.

If you can't rent one, perhaps you have the option to buy with a generous return policy. In the US we have incredible return policies, especially now with the holidays close. B&H, for example, now offers current purchase returns to Feb. 1.

BTW, there are several LUF threads on the A7S.

John
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Old 11-28-2014   #17
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Well, my own experience is an M9 with Zeiss 35/2 and 50/2 lenses, and a wonderful Fuji X-T1 for low light, or challenging physical conditions.

I got the Fuji-branded M adapter, and the Zeiss glass works great on the Fuji with peaking. I ended up getting a 28/35/50 setup (equivalent) for the X-T1 and it has lived up to my expectations as a dSLR styled camera, but about the size and weight of the M9. The thing I really appreciate is that I can set aperture, shutter, and ISO with my face against the VF...truly a nicely laid out tool. Also...it's VERY quiet...quieter than my M6 was, quieter than the Nikon F6 I had in silent mode, about as quiet as the X-Pro 1...AND it'll have 1/32000 second shutter speed in about two weeks.

It's a combo that works for me.
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Old 11-28-2014   #18
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If you are considering using the A7S (or regular A7) wth Leica lenses, check out my 500px


Sony A7 and the 15mm Distagon ZM

For low-light shooting there really isn't anything out there up to the level of the A7S. I have been using it and my Noctilux to shoot concerts, and the results are amazing. Below 12,800 there seems to be no obvious reason to even care about ISO levels.

But as people have said here, the experience is different. Once you maps the controls out there is fairly little reason to go into the menus, so in this regard it is better than the NEX-5.
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Old 11-28-2014   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardKaraa View Post
Oh, regarding focus peaking, I personally find it next to useless. It is much better to turn it off, and rely on image magnification for critical focus. On the M, it is more precise than the A7, in that it will only appear on very tiny parts of the image that are really sharp, and sometimes with wide aperture lenses, will not show at all, even when the image is in focus. On the A7, peaking would appear on high contrast objects that are not in focus, especially in the background. Anyhow I have it turned off on the M too.
Have you adjusted the peaking level? At the low setting I find peaking to be fairly precise way of getting focus, using lenses at their widest aperture. The trick is to look for peaking on specific parts of objects with hard edges - pupils and the edges of glasses, for instance.

I use low for lenses slower than F2 and medium for f1.4 or faster.
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Old 11-28-2014   #20
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Quote:
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Have you adjusted the peaking level? At the low setting I find peaking to be fairly precise way of getting focus, using lenses at their widest aperture. The trick is to look for peaking on specific parts of objects with hard edges - pupils and the edges of glasses, for instance.

I use low for lenses slower than F2 and medium for f1.4 or faster.
I always kept it at the lowest setting. With my high contrast ZM lenses the EVF would light like a Christmas tree at anything higher
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Old 11-28-2014   #21
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I always kept it at the lowest setting. With my high contrast ZM lenses the EVF would light like a Christmas tree at anything higher
I see. The Zeiss line does tend to be very contrasty and not work so well with peaking. My only Zeiss lens is the 15mm which I scale focus at all apertures.

Peaking seems to work best with high resolution/lower contrast lenses such as the 50mm Summilux ASPH and pre-A 35mm Summicrons.
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Old 11-28-2014   #22
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Victor, I wish I had been able to produce B&W output like yours during my A7 experience. Leica lenses maybe? Or perhaps weak post-processing skills on my part.

Whatever reason, you show what's possible with the Sonys. Enjoyed your 500px very much.

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Old 11-28-2014   #23
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Quote:
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I bought a Sony NEX-5n ... I got a headache using it
You definitely want to rent one then. EVFs make me nauseous after using them for just a minute or two. Like getting sea sick. It has something to do with the refresh rate and the way my brain handles it.
I have heard that this is not uncommon, and it seems that if you are getting a headache, you may be having the same issue.
But not all EVFs affect me in the same way. The Fujis, for me, are the worst. I feel it after using them for just a few seconds. Sony and Olympus takes a few minutes.
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Old 11-28-2014   #24
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sleepyhead,
I have recently bought the A7S. I haven't got a digital M, but do have an M3 and IIIF as well as a Hasselblad. Until recently, most of my digital cameras have been Nikon, but I have switched to Olympus and now Sony. I can answer that it is possible to use the A7S fully manually without a huge struggle with menus. I use it with Zeiss ZM lenses and focus manually. It is slower for me to focus than a Leica rangefinder because I find I have to use the magnifier to be certain of focus, but it is very reliable that way in terms of making sure you are focused before you shoot. I love being able to use all of my rangefinder and SLR lenses on the one full-frame camera, and that it has a totally silent shutter. I bought the A7S one day before going on a holiday to Bhutan and didn't regret it. Pictures here: http://members.iinet.net.au/~fingon/...14/bhutan.html
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Old 11-28-2014   #25
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I shoot the A7s and a Leica Monochrom.

I can't speak for using fully manual focus lenses on the A7s (I use the 35mm f2.8, which has AF) while I do leave it on manual focus, I tend to punch in my focus when required (using the button in the AF/MF switch). Never used it with a Leica lens, sorry.

Settings wise, shutter speed, aperture and iso all have their own dials, which given ISO on an M is behind a menu (Least M9 / MM), it is slightly more useful.

I always convert to B&W, so tend to leave my ISO to auto, manually setting speed and aperture.

Only frustrating thing for me is you can't have the silent shutter mode set to a custom button.


1/50th f5.6 ISO 5000
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Old 11-28-2014   #26
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Victor, I wish I had been able to produce B&W output like yours during my A7 experience. Leica lenses maybe? Or perhaps weak post-processing skills on my part.

Whatever reason, yours show what's possible with the Sonys. Enjoyed your 500px very much.

John
Thanks Part of it is a good amount of PP. I process for color first and then do the B&W conversion with Nik Silver EFEX. I simply cannot recommend this software enough - quick conversions when you need them, but also plenty of fine-tuning possible.

IMO the Leicas don't have much of an IQ edge over the Sony Zeiss. Sony Zeiss is generally more contrasty, and some Leica lenses have better bokeh and aberration control, but the difference is subtle. I use Leica because I appreciate the small size and don't care for fly-by-wire manual focusing.
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Old 11-28-2014   #27
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I use LR and Silver EFEX. What I found wanting with the Nex and A7 B&W was the lack of creamy tonality in the light grays and whites. I attributed it to the character of the sensor, but yours say otherwise.

I would appreciate your thoughts on this point.

John
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Old 11-28-2014   #28
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I use LR and Silver EFEX. What I found wanting with the Nex and A7 B&W was the lack of creamy tonality in the light grays and whites. I attributed it to the character of the sensor, but yours say otherwise.

I would appreciate your thoughts on this point.

John
Hmmm...not sure what "creamy" means in this context. But the default tonal contrast from CMOS sensors may be too weak for a good B&W conversion. But with Silver EFEX it is possible to sharpen separately for finest details vs. edges.

CMOS sensors have less highlight space than CCDs (at the benefit of shadow details). If you mean blown-out or close-to-blown highlights, metering for the brightest spot (or always taking 1/3-2/3 stops away from the built in meter) may be a good idea. It is almost certainly less damaging to lift the shadows verses dim the highlights with a CMOS sensor.

What I do is meter for the highlights, then selectively lift the shadows, boosting contrast and detail sharpness as needed. Don't be afraid to push the settings around with A7 files - they can handle a lot more than your average CCD file.

I also find it crucial in processing B&W to make sure the monitor gamma is right. If the monitor itself is blown-out or has too much contrast, no amount of PP will make the files look right.
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Old 11-28-2014   #29
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Thanks, Victor.
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Old 11-28-2014   #30
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Everyone: thank you for your detailed and informative answers to my question.

The conclusion I have drawn is that I NEED to try out the A7s before buying one. If the focus peaking isn't what I hope for, and the EVF makes me ill, then I can lay the idea to rest.

I will look into renting one for a month from the Swedish shop that Jockos pointed out.
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Old 11-28-2014   #31
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Since the M9 seems to have sensor issues, it is a good idea to get a SONY as a second camera anyways. I am so far using the M8 and the M9, with occasionally letting them "rest" while I use M 4/3 cameras. Getting a 10X magnification with the EP cameras for focusing allows me to set focus on eye lashes in full detail for taking portraits. All images come out incredibly sharp.
I agree with Raid here

The advantage of one of the A7 series as a second camera is that it will take any M lens, full frame.

No the results are not as good, esp 35 and wider, but basically I never prefer the Sony results with any lens over the M9. However they can be really good.

As to wide smearing, remember the centers are still very good, so in many shots it's actually not noticeable or an issue at all. The A7s is better in this regard, but does still smear.

The shooting experience is very different, and if you like the M9, you may not love the Sony. Worst is the lack of accurate infinity stops without almost all adapters, except the Hawks CF V3 which has an adjustment. Lack of a way to manually switch from EVF to LCD is really bad, as it can really act up in auto mode. The Mag and Focus peaking need really time to figure out real world. I was pretty used to them, bought an M9, and at first only the results kept me shooting it as the tiny patch just seemed ridiculous.

9 Months later, I far prefer the M9 focusing.

Also I prefer the M9 low light to the Sony A7 (not S), the secret is simple: use fast lenses like the CV 35/1.2 and 50/1.1

Results are superior in low light to A7 for me. Obviously the S is another story. But the Sony Raws are really poor compared to Leica raws when edited in LR.

Sonys are a big step forward, but still quirky and half-finished, for me. Since the tech is all available to produce a really good M body, much smaller and lighter than the M9, I hope we will see one soon. The A7 is essentially the same size or often bigger than the M9 because of the lenses it likes best.


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Old 11-28-2014   #32
GaryLH
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The a7 is a breath of fresh air compared to the Sony nex5n. I used the 5n as my default universal digital back for all my legacy lenses both slr and rf. I now use the Sony a7 for this. The menu system is so much better. Having both front and rear dials to control aperture and shutter speed is really nice when using native af lenses in manual mode. The dedicated exposure compensation dial makes all difference. All the main items outside of iso are controlled w/ a single real control.

The only native fe lens I own is the 35f2.8. I am able to use the old e mount lenses as well at lower 11mp file size though. Focusing w/ Sony version of peaking is good. The center button on the scroll wheel can be used for mag to help focusing.

Don't expect all your legacies lenses to work perfectly w/ the Sony. IMO the 5n worked on a wider range of wide angle rf lenses then the a7. The a7s has been reported to do very well on wide angle rf lenses (I only have the a7).

The shutter on the a7 is not as loud as the a7r, w/ electronic first shutter curtain, about or maybe a bit quieter than the 5n. The a7s w/ electronic shutter is dead quiet.

However, if u are after an rf experience, right now in digital Leica is your only choice especially if u want new. For me, when I have that urge, I'll pick up my film camera

This week I have been shooting w/ the a7 and the vc 40f2 SL and Nikon 105f2.5.

Gary
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Old 11-28-2014   #33
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I have an M9 and a Sony A7. I've not used the NEX cameras other than very superficially; I've used the M9 and A7 extensively. The A7 for me is a body to use with my Leica R and Nikkor SLR lenses. I do occasionally use an M-mount lens on it, but it works better with SLR lenses in general.

The $1300 price tag on the A7 body was justified by the fact that I expected it to prove the best way to make use of what was (when new) about $16,000 worth of excellent lenses, and a lot less expensive than the upgrade cost of going from M9 to M typ 240.

Using the A7:

- It's a clunky little plasticky-feeling camera.

- In use, because I use it with manual focus, adapted lenses, it feels more like a compact DSLR.

- The EVF is very good quality. For lenses 50mm and up, I can focus critically with neither magnification nor focus peaking. I find focus peaking only a moderate assistance at the best of times; magnification is more useful with short focal lengths.

- The sensor is very good and nets very clean results up to ISO 6400, with still "very good" results at ISO 125000 and 256000 if I'm careful with exposure..

- Although there are a bunch of mostly useless buttons and features for my uses, there is just enough cutomizability that I am able to use A and M modes with direct access to ISO, shutter time and aperture without needing to dig into menus. There are a few options that you must dig into the menus, but once you remember where they are, it's not off-putting.

- The EVF and LCD are very good, but the EVF lacks some of the sophistication of the Olympus E-M1 EVF and does not adapt as well to bright sunlight conditions.

- The in-camera panorama and video capture are useful plusses, occasionally.

By comparison to using the M9, the A7 is more versatile and better suited to long lenses or very short lenses (I have R lenses down to 19mm and up to 180mm). The M9 I find to be best used with 28 to 50, occasionally 90, mm lenses where the coupled rangefinder/viewfinder works best. Where I can get marginally good B&W out of the M9 at ISO 2500 and decent color at ISO 1600, the A7 nets two stops more sensitivity. The A7's live histogram, level indication, etc, all provide a great deal of flexibility when shooting.

Which do I like using more? The M9, certainly. It just feels better, better finished, and, when used with 28, 35, and 50 mm lenses that are a good match for the sensor, the image results are easily a match for the A7's 24Mpixel sensor.

Which do I use more? Well, the A7 gets the nod as I feel it works better with a 24mm or 90mm lens.

These are very different cameras. If my goal was to maintain use of my R lenses but keep only one body, I'd sell both the M9 and A7 in exchange for an M-P typ 240. The Live View, optional EVF, improved responsiveness, larger battery, etc, all combine to make it a significant upgrade to the M9.

But I'm lucky and happy to be able to keep both bodies and enjoy them for their individual merits.

G
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Old 11-28-2014   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyhead View Post
I HATED IT! The user experience with NEX-5n was so unlike the film-Leica. Changing the simplest parameter involved going into menus, and somehow the camera never really did what I wanted it to do.
AV, Auto ISO, maybe RAW and you should be done. What did you try to find in the menus?

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Will I have the same visceral rejection of the A7s?
Pretty much, yes. The a7 has a dedicated exposure comp. dial. Otherwise it´s as menu driven as the NEX 5n.
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Old 11-28-2014   #35
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I've used the A7S and it is a very different camera.

I find that I don't need to change settings almost ever -- I set my aperture to f/4, speed to 1/160 and let the auto-iso figure things out.

if something seems wrong, use the exposure compensation dial.

With the Zeiss 35mm and the A7s, I've never really been in a situation (bright or dark) where the camera was a limiting factor.
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Old 11-28-2014   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bille View Post
AV, Auto ISO, maybe RAW and you should be done. What did you try to find in the menus?



Pretty much, yes. The a7 has a dedicated exposure comp. dial. Otherwise it´s as menu driven as the NEX 5n.
+1, which is just about what I had written earlier ( and had been ignored. it is so easy to bash the NEX for their badly designed menus ) but imo if one needs to dive into it one simply has not learned to use this camera well or has never set it up properly.

the hard buttons on my 5n set ISO, shoot mode, drive mode, exposure compensation, magnification and the wheel selects shutter speed. That's all I need.
( Actually I have access to a few more settings via hard buttons: on my cam the button left to the wheel sets drive mode ( single shoot, cont. shoot, self timer asf. ) the middle button ISO ( from there 4 more configurable settings can be accessed with another push of left / right buttons, e.g. WB, metering mode, quality and 5 others more to choose from ) the right button selects shoot mode ( A , S, M asf. ) the lower button around the wheel selects exposure compensation. Leicas are hailed for not being cluttered with buttons, the NEXes get criticized for not having more..)

regarding focus peaking, best set peaking sensitivity to 'low' and focus with lens wide open. Middle and high sensitivities easily show more in focus than actually is. I find the resolution of the EVF fine enough that I can rely on my eyes, not on focus peaking, but do use magnification which I find the more powerful tool. Some recommend to set the camera to B&W for focus peaking working best. If shooting RAW ( + jpeg ) the full file still is there, the B&W image only shows in the EVF ( and recorded jpeg ). My mayor gripe with the 5N is the location of the magnification button, that is improved on the A7 series.

All that said 'in defense' of the 5N, even though it's sensitivity and colors cannot be changed the focus peaking as implemented on my Ricoh GXR M works much better. I can rely on it, however because of the lower resolution EVF I also need to. ( generally I prefer the use and handling of the Ricoh. Can't get myself to buy a A7 because I love EVFs to be articulating, can't talk highly enough of it's many advantages. I consider an EVF taking over the limitation of an OVF of being fixed as a design flaw that I believe manufacturers consciously choose because cameras with fixed EVF 'look' better and therefore sell better )
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Last edited by kuuan : 11-29-2014 at 01:28. Reason: grammer correction
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Old 11-28-2014   #37
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Yaron, another benefit of the A7s is the ability to get the Voigtländer VM close focus adaptor... all of a sudden your M-mount lenses become much more versatile!


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You mean the bridge from the Bridge film series?:-)
That very one
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Old 11-29-2014   #38
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I just went and had another go at using peaking on the A7S and found it worked usefully for me if I turned it to its lowest setting and used my ZM lenses at or near wide open - f2 for the 35 f2 Biogon and f2 for the 50 f1.5 C Sonnar. Interesting comment about Zeiss lenses getting false positives out of the focus peaking because of the high contrast. It's great getting different ideas on these things. I'll have to try my '59 Elmar wide-open! Thanks for nice comments about my Bhutan photos. Much appreciated. Photo from today with focus peaking helping things at f2 on ZM C Sonnar:
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Old 11-29-2014   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcfingon View Post
I just went and had another go at using peaking on the A7S and found it worked usefully for me if I turned it to its lowest setting and used my ZM lenses at or near wide open - f2 for the 35 f2 Biogon and f2 for the 50 f1.5 C Sonnar. Interesting comment about Zeiss lenses getting false positives out of the focus peaking because of the high contrast. It's great getting different ideas on these things. I'll have to try my '59 Elmar wide-open! Thanks for nice comments about my Bhutan photos. Much appreciated. Photo from today with focus peaking helping things at f2 on ZM C Sonnar:
Lovely catch. Glad to hear that the focus peaking may be better with some tweaking.
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Old 11-29-2014   #40
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Originally Posted by DavidKKHansen View Post
Yaron, another benefit of the A7s is the ability to get the Voigtländer VM close focus adaptor... all of a sudden your M-mount lenses become much more versatile!


That very one
Yes, good point David. I'm not used to thinking about close ups. Thanks.
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