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Old 06-15-2013   #41
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Who cares how she got it? She has it, and is using it. Judge not, lest ye be judged.
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Old 06-15-2013   #42
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My thirteen year-old shoots my X100 on occasion. I guess I'm just an enabler...

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Old 06-15-2013   #43
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This thread reminded me of this Petapixel article from last year about rich kids in China using expensive DSLRs
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Old 06-15-2013   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YYV_146 View Post
I saved up for my first DSLR, a canon 450d, when I was 16. Took me a few months and a weekend job.
By 18 I was teaching in a language school in Beijing full-time doing the summer, working 16-hour days for over $2500 a month. I now work 20 hours/week during school and 9-5 during the summer. All of the m lenses I own come this way, as well as my film and bodies.

Edit: I can't drink yet. Just commenting on the general negativity about young people these days, some of us actually work hard for our hobbies
I agree. Don't be quick to judge. All of my camera gear came from money I earned. Leica and all. I mean, I'm pretty broke right now, but hey, I have good cameras that I love.
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Old 06-15-2013   #45
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When I train in to the city, my favorite pastime is to pick an interesting
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Most of the time (but not always), I get jealous of the person in my story for
having such an interesting life.
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Old 06-15-2013   #46
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I gave my 13 yr old a nex-3 used body, and a cv 35/1.4

She shoots the crap out of it. Takes her GFs on photo shoots all the time.

I loaned her some other glass too, but she likes the 35.
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Old 06-15-2013   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YYV_146 View Post
I saved up for my first DSLR, a canon 450d, when I was 16. Took me a few months and a weekend job.
By 18 I was teaching in a language school in Beijing full-time doing the summer, working 16-hour days for over $2500 a month. I now work 20 hours/week during school and 9-5 during the summer. All of the m lenses I own come this way, as well as my film and bodies.

Edit: I can't drink yet. Just commenting on the general negativity about young people these days, some of us actually work hard for our hobbies
Same here, I save up for my Leica gears; having a full-time job during my 16 units semesters..Don't judge if you see a 20 year-old teenager hanging a SUMMILUX ASPH with a Leica on his neck..
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Old 06-15-2013   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olelovold View Post
It's a bit cynical to assume that a young person with an expensive camera got it from his/her parents. More likely that person worked hard to be able to afford it.
More likely? Really? Possible, sure, but much less likely. Either way, if they're using a camera for more than just silly stuff, it's OK with me.
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Old 06-15-2013   #49
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well

depending where you are in Oaktown, it may not be their bmw ...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie Pillers View Post
I have the same reaction when I see high school kids on their way to school in fairly new BMWs. [I'm going to stop here so as not to start up on one of my rants about wealth distribution around this wacky country of ours.]
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Old 06-15-2013   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodchenko View Post
More likely? Really? Possible, sure, but much less likely. Either way, if they're using a camera for more than just silly stuff, it's OK with me.
I don't know how many young photographers you are acquainted with, but I know that from the 70 19-24 year olds I go to university with, most of them paid for their own gear. Of course, the whole discussion is a bit pointless - it doesn't really matter what camera you have or who paid for it, it's the work that counts.
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Old 06-15-2013   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haempe View Post
We comfort each other because we cannot afford a RX1.
Hahaha, that is a good answer

I feel uneasy with this thread, because the purpose looks to me like envy. A young person with an expensive camera, I wouldn't see anything wrong with that. I believe it's one of the western society shortcomings, looking at wealthier people as the enemy, instead of using them as the motivation to working harder to become as wealthy, or just accept the fact that people are not born financially equal. I find Asian people much more gracious about this matter.

TBH, if I saw this girl personally, my first thought would have been, wow, she has really good taste in cameras, or, she must really be serious about her photography to by a FF fixed lens camera, not, wow, how can she afford it!
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Old 06-15-2013   #52
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Bought a brand new M5 in 1977 at the age of 19. Saved up for a year while driving a laundry truck thru the mean neighborhoods of Paterson, NJ. Did this while paying my own rent and going to the New School in NYC, where I paid my own tuition.

Had you seen me walking around NYC with a Leica around ny neck in 1977, you could have made the same assumptions about me.
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Old 06-15-2013   #53
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When I was 18 years old I owned a les Paul deluxe.
If ya would've tried to take it from me I would've slit your throat.
An 18 year old girl with an rx1? I'd give her wide berth. (lol)
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Old 06-15-2013   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olelovold View Post
I don't know how many young photographers you are acquainted with, but I know that from the 70 19-24 year olds I go to university with, most of them paid for their own gear. Of course, the whole discussion is a bit pointless - it doesn't really matter what camera you have or who paid for it, it's the work that counts.
You move in wealthier circles than I.
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Old 06-15-2013   #55
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and then I had a run in with a yuppie college guy online who snarked at me for not being able to afford a Leica Monochrom.

there are goods and bads to every side, i suppose.
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Old 06-15-2013   #56
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It is nice to see young people using cameras rather than cellphones. I just came back from a short vacation and to my disbelief, I saw many people using their tablets as cameras. I don't get it, but I'm old.

The op is a lucky man in that young girls still notice him and posture just to impress him, or maybe she was just sitting on the subway.
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Old 06-15-2013   #57
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camera envy over a teenager using an expensive camera? seriously? who cares?
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Old 06-15-2013   #58
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I'm reminded of one of my favorite bits from the late, great George Carlin: "Anyone who drives slower than you is an idiot; anyone who drives faster than you is a maniac." I guess the same applies to gear: the only person who has the proper amount of gear given his or her income is you.

I'll admit I'm envious of just about anyone with an M Monochrom and/or a Noctilux regardless of age or ability. But whenever I see young people engaging in creative endeavors, no matter how cheap or expensive their tools, my faith in society's future is affirmed.
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Old 06-15-2013   #59
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I'm not envious of someone with an RX-1. It's a lovely camera, and I'm sure they will have fun taking photographs with it, but I don't want one myself.

Sure, I'd envy someone with a Monochrom, but good luck to those who have them.
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Old 06-15-2013   #60
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haha since we are on the topics of envy.

I am envious of people who have their own darkroom.
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Old 06-15-2013   #61
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Envy is pretty natural. My dogs will ignore a bone for weeks; as soon as one of 'em chews on it the other one wants it. C'est la vie. Correlating success with money; and in part, expensive gear with being serious is a more interesting topic. Wish we had one of those popcorn emoticons...
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Old 06-15-2013   #62
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Quote:
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I'm envious of the photographer who makes images that are light years better than mine - and with a simple, inexpensive camera.
So, what makes this 'envy' vs. 'admire', or 'appreciate'? Is it just the wishing for the same skill/talent? If so, I envy most people for one reason or another and long ago accepted that there were those that better me. I've now learned to appreciate, or admire many of these same people. The latter approach sits better with me and keeps the blues away.

The other side of things are people that I resent. These tend to be people that I perceive as taking advantage by exploiting others. I've yet to find a positive turn to this one. I think that my best inoculation for this one are a couple of biblical parables regarding finding fault in others. I don't consider myself a Christian, but there sure are some good lessons to be had from that and many other traditions.
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Old 06-15-2013   #63
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i think if I were 18 and unaccountable to anyone, with a couple empty credit cards, I just might have myself one of those
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Old 06-15-2013   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougFord View Post
When I was 18 years old I owned a les Paul deluxe.
If ya would've tried to take it from me I would've slit your throat.
An 18 year old girl with an rx1? I'd give her wide berth. (lol)
When I was 17 I bought a brand new Les Paul Custom. While still in high school I worked 20 hours a week and then full time during the Summer. It took me 4 months to save up enough. I came from poor immigrant parents but today my kids have it better and if they show talent in photography or any discipline then I would support financially to a certain degree.
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Old 06-15-2013   #65
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Oddly enough, I remember having quite a bit more cash around when I was 18.

Family life is difficult and hard at times, I would never spend that much money on kit again.

Different priorities, I just cannot see why I should be spending that much, better go on holidays etc.

I started with a Leica M4-P that still have and funny enough I now shoot Zorkis and an X-10 most of the time.
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Old 06-15-2013   #66
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So THAT explains all the people staring daggers at me on the Tube recently!

It's not hard for the average young person with a job to accumulate enough cash to buy an expensive camera, especially if they sacrifice other things such as eating out or clubbing. If I saw that girl I'd would've asked her how she likes the camera - then you could've found out if she's serious about photography or had particularly well off parents!
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Old 06-15-2013   #67
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Not sure I know what the issue is, Keith.
  • At age 9, I bought my first adjustable camera: a Minolta 16Ps.
  • At age 12, my grandfather loaned me his Rolleiflex TLR and my mother loaned me her Argus C3. They were what I used for the next year.
  • At age 13, I bought a Nikon F. My grandfather loaned me his Linhof 23 Teknica. Half a year later, I bought my first two Leica RFs.

This was all with my own money, either saved allowance ($5 a week from age 9 until I had my own income) or from the profits I made on my newspaper delivery route and other odd jobs. Photography was already my passion, so I spent my money on photography.

And on lunch, and on school commute transportation. Life was cheaper then.

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Old 06-16-2013   #68
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I'm very happy to see anyone using expensive/pro equipment, because they are a large part of the market. We all benefit through a larger economy of scale and reduced prices etc. Everyone a winner!
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Old 06-16-2013   #69
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When I hear middle-aged guys (like myself) bragging about how they got rich by hard work, I always ask them: Whose work?

Jokes aside - I like it when young people are enthusiastic about what they do and the tools they use, be it a tennis racket, a computer or a camera - no matter who paid for it, and as long as they didn't steal it
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Old 06-16-2013   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olelovold View Post
It's a bit cynical to assume that a young person with an expensive camera got it from his/her parents. More likely that person worked hard to be able to afford it.
Agreed. I bought my first apartment when I was 19 (mortaged of course), no help from parents, I just started work early and saved my money.
I'm a saver by nature, I don't smoke, drive one of the cheapest used cars I could find, maybe this girl did the same?
Maybe this young lady worked hard for her camera, maybe she had generous parents, there isn't anything wrong with either, in fact, in these economically troubled times, we should encourage the wealthy to spend, not just hoard cash.
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Old 06-16-2013   #71
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... Lucky girl to have wealthy parents I thought.

When I was 18, I received my first "real" camera as a combined holiday, birthday present. A Minolta SRT101. Even in today's money, the price of that camera would nowhere approach the price of the RX1.
Reading this, I have to confess that my initial reaction was the same. Thinking about it further, though, I realized that I wasn't being fair.

Back in 1990, I was 19. About that time, I spent $700 on a Meucci pool cue. Today, that works out to about $1200. Over the next couple of years, I probably blew over $2000 in savings playing and practicing straight pool, 8-ball, and 9-ball.

I paid for it by working hard, but living at home sure made it easier.

Back then, I had a Pentax K1000 with the excellent 50mm kit lens, but unfortunately, that was at a time when my interest in photography had waned.

Had I been wiser in my 20s, I would have invested in an M6 (or, knowing what I know now, a mint M2-R) and a 35mm Summicron. Twenty-three years on, I have a mortgage, a wife and a young daughter, numerous other commitments, and I can't afford an RX1, much less the M240 I'd so love to have.

That girl, and the teens and 20-somethings who posted here in response, should be congratulated. You guys have made a great move, even if it brooks some sideways glances from the older set.

You've got yourselves some great gear that will bring you years of satisfaction. Go out, and make good use of it. Well done!
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Old 06-16-2013   #72
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Interesting to read the comments, some nasty, that this post elicited. I was not making any comment on young people with expensive equipment.

The issue? She saw I was looking at the camera and she unfolded her arms to give me a better view, with a look on her face that said, " Ha ha. Look what I've got." I tried talking to her, extremely politely I might add, one photographer to another, but she ignored me. I never had a reaction by a "photographer" like that before.

Big deal right?

BTW - I have worked steadily since I was 12 years old. Back then, one so young needed a permit to work. First in a bakery, then a warehouse packing spices and unloading trucks, and finally, as house painter. This was all after school and on weekends. I supported myself through college and grad school. My parents were of extreme modest means and "bought" me the camera, because I was saving for school. I was interested in photography, and since I was working so much, they wanted to give me something special, to somehow be part of my chosen career path.

Since then, I have bought and paid for every piece of equipment I've ever owned.

The day I saw that girl in the subway, It was pouring rain, she was dripping wet, and her camera was unprotected. This lead me to believe, she didn't buy it herself. Especially for one so young, acting the way she did.

I bought my first Leica back in 1977. A real beater of a M3 with an equally used Canon 50/1.8 Serenar. I treated it well. I paid for it. I was in college and if something should happen, I would not be able to afford another for quite some time.

Big deal, right?
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Old 06-16-2013   #73
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Old 06-16-2013   #74
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If I see an eighteen year old driving a compact hatch or similar in effect I'm probably looking at somethng that is worth several times the cost of an RX1 and I would never assume it was something that was 'bought' for them ... and if it was good luck to them!

Maybe this girl's parents bought her this camera ... maybe they didn't. Maybe the earth really is flat?
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Old 06-17-2013   #75
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haha since we are on the topics of envy.

I am envious of people who have their own darkroom.
That's a good envy.
Because you can't buy a darkroom, the only way to cure that is to build your own
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Old 06-17-2013   #76
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"Comparison is the thief of joy"
President Theodore Roosevelt.
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Old 06-17-2013   #77
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I don't envy anyone their gear, whether they bought it or it was a present. What I do envy is the photographer's "eye" that some have, the ability to take a great photo, make a great composition, etc. All the nice gear in the world can't buy that for me. Drat.
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Old 06-18-2013   #78
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better a camera than a gun...
Better a US made firearm than Canadian.
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Old 06-18-2013   #79
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Interesting to read the comments, some nasty, that this post elicited. I was not making any comment on young people with expensive equipment.
Ummm... you might want to re-read your post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbg32 View Post
...Lucky girl to have wealthy parents I thought.

When I was 18, I received my first "real" camera as a combined holiday, birthday present. A Minolta SRT101. Even in today's money, the price of that camera would nowhere approach the price of the RX1.
It's interesting that you seem to have no problem classifying other people's posts as "nasty"...
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Old 06-18-2013   #80
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Better a US made firearm than Canadian.
Meaning what, exactly?
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