Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Classic Film RangeFinders & Other Classics > Lomography

Lomography Dedicated to discuss all Lomography Products

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Old 06-07-2013   #1
kdemas
ʎlʇuǝɹǝɟɟıp sƃuıɥʇ ǝǝS
 
kdemas's Avatar
 
kdemas is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,704
The San Francisco store is closing for good on the 9th with spots like LA, New York, West Hollywood and Santa Monica already gone. Reports of huge employee turnover on twitter as well.

This is really too bad as it was a nice way to re-introduce film photography to many in a whimsical way, utter simplicity. The people at our SF store are very nice and helpful, the company set a good tone.

Evidently the popularity of this trend of "hipster" adoption of film might have been overblown.

Here's a view on why the LA store shut down. With the SF closure there are no more gallery stores on the west coast.

http://blogs.laweekly.com/arts/2013/...ter_camera.php
__________________
------------------------------------------------------------
Open Iris. Life, Captured.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #2
BW400CN
Bessamatic forever!
 
BW400CN is offline
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 385
hipster jump on and off - if something is today hip and trend - tomorrow it will be dull, boring and out of fashion.
If a company tries to deal with this people they must be aware that they might run away as fast as they have come.

I liked the lomoway, but never ever dealed with them - so it wouldn┤t be a big lost for me.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #3
kaiwasoyokaze
Half Frame Goodness
 
kaiwasoyokaze's Avatar
 
kaiwasoyokaze is offline
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Busan/ HK/ Vancouver
Posts: 386
I wanted to go the branch in Seoul but that one closed down recently too. I don't how well it is doing but I always thought LOMO was strong in the Asia. Hopefully the one in HK doesnt close down too.
__________________
http://kaiwasoyokaze.tumblr.com/
Analogue in Busan

http://soyokazekaiwa.tumblr.com/
Monologue in Busan
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #4
jsrockit
Moderator
 
jsrockit's Avatar
 
jsrockit is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NYC
Age: 43
Posts: 17,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdemas View Post
Evidently the popularity of this trend of "hipster" adoption of film might have been overblown.
Every film story is overblown on RFF!

NYC still has one store I believe...
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #5
pdexposures
Registered User
 
pdexposures's Avatar
 
pdexposures is offline
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: PDX
Posts: 220
We talked about this on an early episode of the podcast, stores are closing all over. And their more recent cameras have not lived up to the hype both in sales and in quality.
__________________
The Kit:

Leica M6- 35mm Cron V3 / 50mm Cron V3 / 90mm Elmar-C
Hasselblad 500cm - 80mm Planar
Nikon FM3a - 50mm 1.4 Nikkor


www.pdexposures.com <- Film camera reviews, podcast, flim news and general tom foolery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #6
jwicaksana
Jakarta, Indonesia
 
jwicaksana is offline
Join Date: Apr 2012
Age: 28
Posts: 598
Maybe they are pushing their online sales? Jakarta store is still running I believe, but many find the price unattractive. Easier to buy from the site and even with taxes and DHL freight some find it to be the better deal. Also I've been introducing Yashica GSN, Nikon FE/FM series to them and they are actually thrilled to have some metal and glass for less money than a Sprocket Rocket.
__________________
Cheers,

Jonathan

MOXS Photography

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jwicaksana
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #7
btgc
Registered User
 
btgc's Avatar
 
btgc is offline
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 4,754
We see this then and now, growth, saturation and demise. So this happens also with sushi and coffee shops, when they grow bigger and fatter than mere rice and coffee beans can feed. Sometimes it's wise to keep weight under control to not break under own weight.
__________________
MyFlickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #8
thegman
Registered User
 
thegman is offline
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Age: 37
Posts: 3,826
That's a shame, I hope it's more to do with the the collapse of retail in general, rather than film camera/film sales in particular.

In the UK at least, many retailers are going to the wall, I don't think it's what they are selling, it's the way they are selling it. It's just too easy to order on Amazon rather than hump it to the high street and battle the crowds.
__________________
My Blog
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #9
alienmeatsack
Registered User
 
alienmeatsack's Avatar
 
alienmeatsack is offline
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 742
I think the last paragraph about using "food truck" style delivery and lab services is a brilliant idea.

Why hasn't someone done this already? You sell cameras and film from the truck, do labs and classes in nearby parks with the truck there to supply needs for the classes. Announce the locations so people can expect it, but also do surprise locations with special sales to motivate people to find the truck.

You could do lab stuff too but that would be a bit more complicated. Maybe if you had the ability to at least pickup/drop off stuff there that was either going to be processed at the LomoLab (sent off by the truck people) or processed locally somewhere and then you could pick up your prints/film later. Offer the same LomoLab services with photo uploads to your account as well. Perhaps.

I'd like to see more then just their brand of rebranded expensive film though if they are selling film. Would be nice for them to have some normal stuff that is priced accordingly. I mean, I can get this stuff online for way cheaper, but the whole point of this truck idea is to get people to find the truck, hang out, talk, take photos, and buy stuff. You get people buying at a reasonable price they will come back.

I personally own quite a few of their cameras. Mostly overpriced but some of them are brilliant in their uniqueness or they offer something special in some way.

My favorites are:

Spinner 360 - never saw anything like that before I got mine. I always get comments when I use it out in public and people love to see the photos that come from it.

Belair X 6-12 - an affordable folder with 3 shot sizes and very easy to use. A little over priced but worth it if you want to do medium format and have lots of sizes to pick from.

I think the Sardina is a good all around "intro to Lomo" camera as is the Holga. But both do have an unforgiving learning curve if you aren't used to film. I cant tell you how many rolls of expensive 120 I wasted before I started getting shots I cared for from the Holga.

So, imagine this truck. You see it, it has some screens displaying slide shows of cool photos as well as some of the cameras and film they offer. Go up, ask questions, see something that you like, they show you how it works, maybe let you snap a few shots with it (you buy the film they offer use of the camera to try it). Offer bundles where you get a camera and some film right there and they help you learn how to use it right there on the spot so you literally leave with exposed photos already in camera.

Impulse purchase energy relies heavily on demos, hands on and "ohh and ahh" factors. I think a cool looking truck that was mobile and could get around could do some good for Lomo and film itself.
__________________
I own too many cameras to list.
My Flickr, Lomography, & Oggl galleries.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #10
Spicy
Registered User
 
Spicy is offline
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: DC
Age: 30
Posts: 659
As much as I'm not an advocate of "lifestyle branding" marketing (Lomo, Leica, Ducati, Harley Davidson), I think Lomo had the best legitimate shot at rebooting film sales somewhat, and as annoying as hipsters may be, anything that gets more film sold regularly is a good thing in my book, and an absence that will be missed.
__________________
ID7P0M2F854Ior+50PdV3MSFcC05MNC00
[:] ['☼║]
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #11
louisb
Registered User
 
louisb's Avatar
 
louisb is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 232
It is a shame. For those of us shooting film LOMO is helping is extend the life of film products. I hope they are not about to go under.

For what it is worth, I get my film processed at a place in London which stocks all the LOMO products and they are quite busy at the weekends with people buying the stuff.

LouisB
__________________
"I shoot what I like and I like what I shoot"
Latest book "Ampthill" now available
My Flickr stream
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #12
bjornkeizers
Registered User
 
bjornkeizers's Avatar
 
bjornkeizers is offline
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 186
Well, seems like a good time to stock up on some of Lomo's odd films then. Love them or hate them, they're basically the only game in town for at least 110...

I own a few of their cameras, just because it's a nice change a pace from some of the more professional stuff that I use.

The one thing that always annoyed me about Lomo is they never seemed to have any stock on certain films. We'll see if I can finally snag some of that 110 slide stuff.
__________________
Canon GIII QL17, EOS 5/630/1000FN
Minolta X570 - XG-1 - XG-M
Minox 35 GT/PL B, LX, EC
Pentax Auto 110 - Polaroid 1000 Land Camera & CPII - Fuji Instax Mini 7S - Ricoh FF70 - Olympus XA1, XA2, Mju II - Bronica ETRS - Holga 120 - Diana 120 - Lomo Fisheye 110
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #13
tunalegs
Pretended Artist
 
tunalegs's Avatar
 
tunalegs is offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 2,024
They have been closing a lot of stores mostly because they put stores in the wrong areas. Lomography cameras are a niche product, but they put stores in areas with sky high rents, and often the "wrong kind" of public.
For instance here in Austin they had a store on congress right by the capitol building - a very high rent area, but unfortunately not the area with the sort of people that would buy their cameras. Had they set up shop on south congress where all the "hip" tourists spend their time in trendy antique shops, clothing stores, etc. they would have gotten a lot more traffic.

It was likely part of trying to market a fancy image, but it came back and bit them on the butt.

Is lomography in trouble though? Probably not.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #14
giellaleafapmu
Registered User
 
giellaleafapmu is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 887
I always thought that Lomo was a good way to have people rediscover film photography but then you move and pass to something else. If you are attracted by the look of a camera with no film pressure plate you buy any camera you like and remove them, if you are attracted by experimentation of old processes you move to LF or pinhole. If you just like film photography you buy "normal" cameras at a fraction of the price. Fuji makes much better classic PS film cameras which are often cheaper than Lomos... Maybe now it is time for them to move further to something different than overpriced plastic cameras with bad lenses and no pressure plates...

GLF
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=1808'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #15
BLKRCAT
100% Film
 
BLKRCAT's Avatar
 
BLKRCAT is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,296
if lomo goes under i better get my order of "purple" film i placed back when it was released...
__________________
blkrcatphoto.tumblr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #16
tunalegs
Pretended Artist
 
tunalegs's Avatar
 
tunalegs is offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 2,024
Quote:
Originally Posted by giellaleafapmu View Post
I always thought that Lomo was a good way to have people rediscover film photography but then you move and pass to something else. If you are attracted by the look of a camera with no film pressure plate you buy any camera you like and remove them, if you are attracted by experimentation of old processes you move to LF or pinhole. If you just like film photography you buy "normal" cameras at a fraction of the price. Fuji makes much better classic PS film cameras which are often cheaper than Lomos... Maybe now it is time for them to move further to something different than overpriced plastic cameras with bad lenses and no pressure plates...

GLF
Maybe they will move on to cameras without film doors, or cameras with silly film rewind knobs.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #17
sevo
Fokutorendaburando
 
sevo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Frankfurt, Germany
Posts: 6,167
As far as I can make out, the shops are franchises - and fashion gadget franchises tend to have a pretty short life, even at the best of times, when (indeed because) the product establishes itself.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #18
giellaleafapmu
Registered User
 
giellaleafapmu is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 887
Quote:
Originally Posted by tunalegs View Post
Maybe they will move on to cameras without film doors, or cameras with silly film rewind knobs.
That's a good step toward a camera which need to have the cap on every time you advance the film...

GLF
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=1808'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #19
kdemas
ʎlʇuǝɹǝɟɟıp sƃuıɥʇ ǝǝS
 
kdemas's Avatar
 
kdemas is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevo View Post
As far as I can make out, the shops are franchises - and fashion gadget franchises tend to have a pretty short life, even at the best of times, when (indeed because) the product establishes itself.
Very good point. To clarify my original post... for all I know the online Lomo presence could be doing huge business. I don't want to imply its going away, just that the retail side is having issues.
__________________
------------------------------------------------------------
Open Iris. Life, Captured.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #20
alienmeatsack
Registered User
 
alienmeatsack's Avatar
 
alienmeatsack is offline
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 742
The article said that their online side is doing well and is where most folks are going to get their products.

To me this still backs up the "food truck" idea. Roving location, cool idea. No one really does stuff in these trucks that isn't food or drinks except in places like Mexico where anything you can setup shop in has stuff for sale.

I don't think they are going out of business, I think they are doing very well most likely. Just as was said above, they picked the wrong locations for their shops. I'd like to see them put more effort into having a presence in local film/camera shops personally.

So you can buy some Lomography gear and film, talk to experts of film and photography, and buy more then just their stuff.

Not that I go to the local film/camera place... I get everything online anymore. So I may be the the kind of customer that has caused these shops to close.
__________________
I own too many cameras to list.
My Flickr, Lomography, & Oggl galleries.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-07-2013   #21
mugent
Registered User
 
mugent is offline
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 475
In the UK at least, the high street does not offer a pleasant experience, in central London it's *extremely* busy, I often needed to take the back road, or walk on the road itself, dodging cars and cyclists. Only to get to a shop and find they don't have stock, or they try to sell you on accessories or extended warranties.

The retail industry needs to change urgently, or the online stores are going to completely take over.

We are in the middle of a major transition, a similar one to when supermarkets took over, and all the little bakers and grocers went under.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-10-2013   #22
vdonovan
Vince Donovan
 
vdonovan is offline
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 488
I know the management of the SF Lomography store, and we sell Lomography cameras in our shop, so I've had a pretty up close view of what's going on with the brand.

First off, the Lomography gallery stores are not franchises. They are funded, built and closely managed by Lomography. There are also small stores like ours that carry Lomography products as merchandise, but to my knowledge there are no real franchises.

I don't know how Lomo is doing as a company, but I think as far as the stores are concerned, they are taking action on a bad business decision, which was to expand in the retail market and compete not only with their other retailers (like us), but also with their own online store. They make much more profit selling a camera online than through one of their stores, so why have stores? I believe Lomography thought the stores would expand their overall market (like the Apple stores did for Apple), but it turned out not to be the case.

As a Lomography user and retailer, I have mixed feelings about the brand and their products. I fully credit Lomography with stoking excitement in film photography and introducing it to a new generation of photographers. Lomography, if nothing else, is genius at marketing and I'm REALLY glad that what they are marketing is film photography. I also agree with alienmeatsack above that their products are interesting and innovative. And they brought back 110! How cool is that?

In our shop, however, we and our customers have struggled with the quality of Lomography products (and their sister brand The Impossible Project), especially given the price. While I love the Diana Mini, we rarely recommend it anymore because they usually break within a few weeks. This is also true of the Sardina, and everyone I know with an LCA has had it break. From what we can see, the quality problem has definitely dimmed interest in Lomography cameras.

I think their business of marketing cameras as style products (like shoes) has been surprisingly successful, but they are starting to find the limits, and are perhaps losing some sales as their customers get frustrated with some products and move on to other entertainments. Closing the gallery stores is a wise business decision that will hopefully ensure that the brand continues to thrive for a long time.
__________________

Vince Donovan
Portrait Photographer
San Francisco, CA
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-10-2013   #23
Keith
On leave from Gallifrey
 
Keith's Avatar
 
Keith is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 18,186
Quote:
Originally Posted by vdonovan View Post
I know the management of the SF Lomography store, and we sell Lomography cameras in our shop, so I've had a pretty up close view of what's going on with the brand.

First off, the Lomography gallery stores are not franchises. They are funded, built and closely managed by Lomography. There are also small stores like ours that carry Lomography products as merchandise, but to my knowledge there are no real franchises.

I don't know how Lomo is doing as a company, but I think as far as the stores are concerned, they are taking action on a bad business decision, which was to expand in the retail market and compete not only with their other retailers (like us), but also with their own online store. They make much more profit selling a camera online than through one of their stores, so why have stores? I believe Lomography thought the stores would expand their overall market (like the Apple stores did for Apple), but it turned out not to be the case.

As a Lomography user and retailer, I have mixed feelings about the brand and their products. I fully credit Lomography with stoking excitement in film photography and introducing it to a new generation of photographers. Lomography, if nothing else, is genius at marketing and I'm REALLY glad that what they are marketing is film photography. I also agree with alienmeatsack above that their products are interesting and innovative. And they brought back 110! How cool is that?

In our shop, however, we and our customers have struggled with the quality of Lomography products (and their sister brand The Impossible Project), especially given the price. While I love the Diana Mini, we rarely recommend it anymore because they usually break within a few weeks. This is also true of the Sardina, and everyone I know with an LCA has had it break. From what we can see, the quality problem has definitely dimmed interest in Lomography cameras.

I think their business of marketing cameras as style products (like shoes) has been surprisingly successful, but they are starting to find the limits, and are perhaps losing some sales as their customers get frustrated with some products and move on to other entertainments. Closing the gallery stores is a wise business decision that will hopefully ensure that the brand continues to thrive for a long time.


Thanks for the informative post ... answers most questions for me.
__________________
---------------------------
flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-10-2013   #24
kdemas
ʎlʇuǝɹǝɟɟıp sƃuıɥʇ ǝǝS
 
kdemas's Avatar
 
kdemas is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,704
Thanka for the perspective Vince, interesting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vdonovan View Post
I know the management of the SF Lomography store, and we sell Lomography cameras in our shop, so I've had a pretty up close view of what's going on with the brand.

First off, the Lomography gallery stores are not franchises. They are funded, built and closely managed by Lomography. There are also small stores like ours that carry Lomography products as merchandise, but to my knowledge there are no real franchises.

I don't know how Lomo is doing as a company, but I think as far as the stores are concerned, they are taking action on a bad business decision, which was to expand in the retail market and compete not only with their other retailers (like us), but also with their own online store. They make much more profit selling a camera online than through one of their stores, so why have stores? I believe Lomography thought the stores would expand their overall market (like the Apple stores did for Apple), but it turned out not to be the case.

As a Lomography user and retailer, I have mixed feelings about the brand and their products. I fully credit Lomography with stoking excitement in film photography and introducing it to a new generation of photographers. Lomography, if nothing else, is genius at marketing and I'm REALLY glad that what they are marketing is film photography. I also agree with alienmeatsack above that their products are interesting and innovative. And they brought back 110! How cool is that?

In our shop, however, we and our customers have struggled with the quality of Lomography products (and their sister brand The Impossible Project), especially given the price. While I love the Diana Mini, we rarely recommend it anymore because they usually break within a few weeks. This is also true of the Sardina, and everyone I know with an LCA has had it break. From what we can see, the quality problem has definitely dimmed interest in Lomography cameras.

I think their business of marketing cameras as style products (like shoes) has been surprisingly successful, but they are starting to find the limits, and are perhaps losing some sales as their customers get frustrated with some products and move on to other entertainments. Closing the gallery stores is a wise business decision that will hopefully ensure that the brand continues to thrive for a long time.
__________________
------------------------------------------------------------
Open Iris. Life, Captured.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-10-2013   #25
pdexposures
Registered User
 
pdexposures's Avatar
 
pdexposures is offline
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: PDX
Posts: 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by vdonovan View Post
In our shop, however, we and our customers have struggled with the quality of Lomography products (and their sister brand The Impossible Project), especially given the price.
Not sure in what regard you meant "sister brand" but it should be clarified the two have nothing to do with one another other than occupying the same marketplace.
__________________
The Kit:

Leica M6- 35mm Cron V3 / 50mm Cron V3 / 90mm Elmar-C
Hasselblad 500cm - 80mm Planar
Nikon FM3a - 50mm 1.4 Nikkor


www.pdexposures.com <- Film camera reviews, podcast, flim news and general tom foolery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-10-2013   #26
Keith
On leave from Gallifrey
 
Keith's Avatar
 
Keith is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 18,186
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdexposures View Post
Not sure in what regard you meant "sister brand" but it should be clarified the two have nothing to do with one another other than occupying the same marketplace.

I took this to be Vince's meaning.

As for Lomo ... with clever marketing you can sell things that break for a while but eventualy it does come back to bite you on the arse!
__________________
---------------------------
flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-10-2013   #27
pdexposures
Registered User
 
pdexposures's Avatar
 
pdexposures is offline
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: PDX
Posts: 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
I took this to be Vince's meaning.
I assumed the same as well, I just wanted to make sure as referring to Nikon and Canon as "Sister Companies" is something I've never heard haha.
__________________
The Kit:

Leica M6- 35mm Cron V3 / 50mm Cron V3 / 90mm Elmar-C
Hasselblad 500cm - 80mm Planar
Nikon FM3a - 50mm 1.4 Nikkor


www.pdexposures.com <- Film camera reviews, podcast, flim news and general tom foolery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-10-2013   #28
vdonovan
Vince Donovan
 
vdonovan is offline
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdexposures View Post
Not sure in what regard you meant "sister brand" but it should be clarified the two have nothing to do with one another other than occupying the same marketplace.
They are related in the sense that Florian Kaps was a founder of both companies:

http://www.the-impossible-project.co...oc&type=people


I don't know for a fact that Lomography has any ownership stake in Impossible, but my friends at Lomography and Impossible have told me that is the case. Regardless, both companies have an identical approach to the analog photography market, in that they emphasize marketing and style and de-emphasize quality.
__________________

Vince Donovan
Portrait Photographer
San Francisco, CA
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-10-2013   #29
pdexposures
Registered User
 
pdexposures's Avatar
 
pdexposures is offline
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: PDX
Posts: 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by vdonovan View Post
They are related in the sense that Florian Kaps was a founder of both companies:

http://www.the-impossible-project.co...oc&type=people

Kaps came to Lomography in 2001 according to that link, almost 10 years after Lomography was founded:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lomography
__________________
The Kit:

Leica M6- 35mm Cron V3 / 50mm Cron V3 / 90mm Elmar-C
Hasselblad 500cm - 80mm Planar
Nikon FM3a - 50mm 1.4 Nikkor


www.pdexposures.com <- Film camera reviews, podcast, flim news and general tom foolery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #30
jsrockit
Moderator
 
jsrockit's Avatar
 
jsrockit is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NYC
Age: 43
Posts: 17,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post

As for Lomo ... with clever marketing you can sell things that break for a while but eventualy it does come back to bite you on the arse!
Has it had a lot of issues with its items breaking?
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #31
Keith
On leave from Gallifrey
 
Keith's Avatar
 
Keith is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 18,186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsrockit View Post
Has it had a lot of issues with its items breaking?
According to Vince ... yes!

Quote:
In our shop, however, we and our customers have struggled with the quality of Lomography products (and their sister brand The Impossible Project), especially given the price. While I love the Diana Mini, we rarely recommend it anymore because they usually break within a few weeks. This is also true of the Sardina, and everyone I know with an LCA has had it break. From what we can see, the quality problem has definitely dimmed interest in Lomography cameras.
__________________
---------------------------
flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #32
jsrockit
Moderator
 
jsrockit's Avatar
 
jsrockit is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NYC
Age: 43
Posts: 17,665
Back when I was using Dianas and Holgas in the early 90s, the lightleaks, cracks, and overall ****ty quality was part of the appeal, but they were also dirt cheap. You'd routinely see them with a lot of black tape to cover light leaks. I guess once Lomography started raising the prices by 300-500%, people expected more from them.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #33
jtm6
Registered User
 
jtm6 is offline
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 296
I see a lot of their products available in the college and hipster areas of this city. Of course the cameras are twice the price – and a roll of B&W film is FOUR TIMES the retail price down the road at the pro photography store. No wonder the crowd that survives off of PBR and ramen noodles is moving away from film and $99+ junk cameras.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #34
Aristophanes
Registered User
 
Aristophanes is offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 776
They sold film and cameras but absolutely no way to process and scan or print your photos. The entire business model of Lomography was built on the expectation that minilabs would continue to exist as local, accessible, and, most importantly, affordable places for people to get their film into usable formats. Until that problem is rectified, likely by creation, purchase, or association with a large mail order processor, I cannot see Lomo surviving.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #35
jsrockit
Moderator
 
jsrockit's Avatar
 
jsrockit is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NYC
Age: 43
Posts: 17,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aristophanes View Post
They sold film and cameras but absolutely no way to process and scan or print your photos. The entire business model of Lomography was built on the expectation that minilabs would continue to exist as local, accessible, and, most importantly, affordable places for people to get their film into usable formats. Until that problem is rectified, likely by creation, purchase, or association with a large mail order processor, I cannot see Lomo surviving.
The lomography stores in NYC developed and scanned film. I think the stores were part of its plan to do exactly what you are saying.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #36
kdemas
ʎlʇuǝɹǝɟɟıp sƃuıɥʇ ǝǝS
 
kdemas's Avatar
 
kdemas is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aristophanes View Post
They sold film and cameras but absolutely no way to process and scan or print your photos. The entire business model of Lomography was built on the expectation that minilabs would continue to exist as local, accessible, and, most importantly, affordable places for people to get their film into usable formats. Until that problem is rectified, likely by creation, purchase, or association with a large mail order processor, I cannot see Lomo surviving.
They have their own developing service as well.

http://shop.lomography.com/us/servic...manent_lomolab
__________________
------------------------------------------------------------
Open Iris. Life, Captured.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #37
tunalegs
Pretended Artist
 
tunalegs's Avatar
 
tunalegs is offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 2,024
I've actually found lomography has good deals on film... but mostly just because local stores don't carry the "real" stuff. For instance I can buy Fomapan 100 in the Lomography three pack from the local store for less than the price of two rolls of Fuji or Kodak B/W. I'm sure if the store just carried Foma products it would be a bit cheaper still, but I can't complain really.

They also sell a three pack of 36 EXP. Kodak 100 ASA for the same price as four pack of 24EXP Fuji 200 ASA at Walmart. So that's another good deal.

Then of course they have 110 film which you're not going to find anywhere else.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #38
thegman
Registered User
 
thegman is offline
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Age: 37
Posts: 3,826
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsrockit View Post
Has it had a lot of issues with its items breaking?
I had an LC-A+ which did sort of come apart at the seams. Build quality is pretty poor, but I still liked it and would consider getting the wide model if it was just a little less expensive.
__________________
My Blog
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #39
Rick Waldroup
Registered User
 
Rick Waldroup's Avatar
 
Rick Waldroup is offline
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 900
Well, I just purchased my first film camera since 2005- a Lomo Oktomat. I am starting a new project June 21 which will be shot mostly with digital, but also with some film, hence the Lomo. I will also be using some instant print film for this project- I will be shooting a Polaroid SX-70.

It feels weird shooting film again. I just loaded the Oktomat with some Kokak 400 Gold and I am off to do a bit of street shooting with it.

My wife thinks I have lost my freaking mind.....
__________________
Rick Waldroup Photography
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2013   #40
swoop
Registered User
 
swoop's Avatar
 
swoop is offline
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: New York City
Age: 34
Posts: 1,712
Hipstamatic and Instagram did them in. It was coold and fun and new for awhile, but like all things, the digitization of it made it obsolete. Which is funny because that was the point of the whole thing was that it was analog. But now that all those "effects" of using Holga's and Zenit's have become mainstream, it's no longer interesting.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:30.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.