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Has digital made photography too easy?
Old 12-16-2012   #1
Pickett Wilson
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Has digital made photography too easy?

No, this isn't a cheap shot at amateur photographers. I'm actually talking to serious photographers - amateur or otherwise.

Has the ease of digital photography decreased the pleasure you get from photography?

Film photographers are welcome to the discussion, too.
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Old 12-16-2012   #2
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Yes, technology made it easier to make technically good photos. However, that is only the small part, it's all in the content (framing, composition, timing) at least for me.
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Old 12-16-2012   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pickett Wilson View Post
No, this isn't a cheap shot at amateur photographers. I'm actually talking to serious photographers - amateur or otherwise.

Has the ease of digital photography decreased the pleasure you get from photography?

Film photographers are welcome to the discussion, too.
Don't think so. Why would it?

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Old 12-16-2012   #4
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I think photography has been easy for a long time. I find using my Zeiss Super Ikonta very easy, and using that has not changed a lot since it was released, except perhaps for faster films, which make using faster shutter speeds easier. Other than that, it's an easy camera to use, and has been for a long time. Taking *good* photos is entirely another issue, and I don't think digital changes that except for the ability to chimp, but that only really helps if your subject isn't going anywhere.

For me, something becoming too easy will diminish how much pleasure I get for something. Effort/reward applies in every hobby I've ever had, from building radio controlled cars, to going to the gym, programming computers, playing pool and snooker, and now photography.

I can't think of very many hobbies where effort would not play a part in how much I enjoyed it. Maybe bungee jumping or something, where it's very easy to fall off a ledge, but still excellent fun.
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Old 12-16-2012   #5
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Digital certainly changed the darkroom, which used to be an area where the photographer had enormous control to complete his/her vision of the image (or try to salvage something that fell short) whereas digital darkroom invited everyone in the food chain to tinker, and less emphasis on getting the perfect negative/capture.

To my mind, there have been many incremental developments that have made photography progressively easier, reducing the requirement for time-consuming apprenticeship. These include: Standardized chemistry and emulsions; in-camera metering; accurate auto-exposure; reliable auto-focus. Most of these are now considered indespensable but originally were innovations.
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Old 12-16-2012   #6
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A basic snapshot is much easier to accomplish than it used to be. With auto everything one just points and pushes. However, as we know there is much more to beautiful or impactful photography than snap shots. In some cases the high tech stuff makes it harder to control the tendency for the camera to decide that everything should be average.
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Old 12-16-2012   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pickett Wilson View Post
. . . .
Has the ease of digital photography decreased the pleasure you get from photography?
. . . .
Definitely the opposite. The picture taking event is so easy now that I can spend my thoughts (before the shutter click) thinking about what should be in the picture and (after the shutter click) what I want it to look like.

Also, if you include computer post-processing, making an image now takes MORE time and effort for me because I never had my own darkroom, but now I spend lots of time on the computer manipulating images.
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Old 12-16-2012   #8
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If anything has made photography "too easy", you are probably just doing it wrong.
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Old 12-16-2012   #9
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I'm "relearning" developing film and prints in the darkroom. Yep, digital has eliminated the need to learn the former processes. But some of those processes have been replaced with digital and color technologies, like managing data.

Is the new technology easier? Maybe not, if you had to learn from scratch.
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Old 12-16-2012   #10
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For people photography I find the most important ingredients are:

Posing
Lighting
Composition
Rapport with subject(s)

I'm a minimalist relative to equipment as I think it can occupy too much of the process, at least with photographing people.

My 2 cents.
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Old 12-16-2012   #11
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Digital photography, for me, is not really a problem; it's all the automation that usually comes with it. Take all the dozens of auto-focus settings on my Nikon D7000. Ridiculous. Yes this definitely takes away the pleasure. I would think that shooting an M-9 would be a real pleasure.
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Old 12-16-2012   #12
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If the question is asked as 'has digital made good photography any easier' then the answer is no, I think. There's still a lot of crap out there which I contribute to regularly.
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Old 12-16-2012   #13
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The last Nikon film camera was the F6 ... that camera made film photography as easy as it was ever going to get. Every bit as easy as a D700 or similar.

Or are we talking clunky rangefinders here?
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Old 12-16-2012   #14
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I have two digital cameras that I use frequently. However I feel like a computer monitor not a photographer when using them. On the D90, I sometimes put the thing in manual so I feel like I have more control. When using the M3, I am in control, not the computer. Plus I despise the cheap plasticky feel of modern cameras.
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Old 12-16-2012   #15
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I think even a cursory glance at Flickr or similar should answer this question.

Easier maybe, better, probably not. Although I would argue for me at least, film choice bakes in a certain look and for me since I generally like this look, digital is more difficult because I fight the medium to get it to look pleasing to my eye. In fact though I long for the supposed ease of digital, for me it's actually more difficult.

As to how much it has decreased the pleasure, that I would think is a very individual question.

Personally I get more immediate, visceral pleasure using my Leica M4p than any other camera, film or digital. However when I'm looking at the results, the pleasure from a good shot is roughly equal. Using a Mamiya 7 isn't' especially pleasurable (though it's a nice camera) but looking at the scanned negatives certainly is.
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Old 12-16-2012   #16
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As someone who uses both, no. I'm also getting a little tired of these "are things worse than they used to be?" threads. So I won't be posting in them or reading them any more.

Things are different. Things always change. For nearly 100 years photography has been a mass medium. The advent of color didn't make creating amazing images easier or worse nor did auto focus, 35mm film or anything else.

Making a photograph that spans distance, emotion and time is still one of the most difficult things to do in art. Nothing is going to change that. In my opinion.

End rant.
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Old 12-16-2012   #17
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I find street photography really difficult. I'm not much interested in any other kind of photography. I've recently bought an X100, my first digital camera. The X100 doesn't make street photography any easier. I now have a choice of colour or monochrome but that's it as far as I'm concerned. It's still really difficult to capture something I want to keep or print.
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Old 12-16-2012   #18
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The drudgery is gone. Is that what you miss? or maybe the sending out of masses of film and a large check when you have a project, or just a vacation?

You could always just snap away with a film camera and hope for the best. That allows for easy production of crap.
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Old 12-16-2012   #19
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Damaso, my intent isn't to prod anyone to say things are worse than they used to be. I was an early adopter of digital. I was always frustrated with film's weaknesses. After decades of film, digital was the second coming for me.

The real question, I guess, isn't really about process. The process is just a tool to communicate a passion for something else. I'm curious about how digital has shifted the equation. How important, indeed, have photographer's realized, with the shift, that the process actually is, to the pleasure they get from photography?
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Old 12-16-2012   #20
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More than anything, digital technology has made banal and idle chit-chat about photography very easy through online social platforms.

If we all spend as much energy taking photos and processing them as we do with our forum agendas, we'd be far better photographers.
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Old 12-16-2012   #21
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Exdsc, there is no agenda. I'm always interested in hearing what people think about photography.
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Old 12-16-2012   #22
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My two cents ... digital made it easier to get some shot easily but the huge amount of photos produced using the new technology has set a new level pole. Sticking out of the mass has become more difficult.
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Old 12-16-2012   #23
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I sit in front of a computer all day and design, for me, analog photography is an outlet which I can have control of the craft physically.. The most digital work I do is "gradient" black and white at the end of a B&W scan and touch up dust.. to me that is easy.
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Old 12-16-2012   #24
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I find it more difficult personally, too much choice
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Old 12-16-2012   #25
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'you push the button, we do the rest'...

i'm 62 and my mother used to take great family snapshots with an instamatic and a polaroid...

photography is as easy or as hard as you want it to be...digital or film...auto everything or manual...
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Old 12-16-2012   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maddoc View Post
...the huge amount of photos produced using the new technology has set a new level pole...
+1 to this. Digital certainly makes it easier to see way more lousy photographs.

I find color photography to be vastly easier today than it was 15 years ago. I can have a top drawer color "lab" here in my studio with basically zero headaches or maintenance. At the volumes I work that was just impossible before digital. Living outside a city meant sending film off somewhere, or driving for two hours to a color lab. Getting proofs back a week later, making any notes needed and waiting another week for a print. Now, I can shoot something and have a proof print in hand in minutes. That's easier, and cheaper.
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Old 12-16-2012   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DamenS View Post
If anything has made photography "too easy", you are probably just doing it wrong.
Elegant!

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Old 12-16-2012   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshapero View Post
Digital photography, for me, is not really a problem; it's all the automation that usually comes with it. Take all the dozens of auto-focus settings on my Nikon D7000. Ridiculous. Yes this definitely takes away the pleasure. I would think that shooting an M-9 would be a real pleasure.
IMO thats why the M digis are so popular. Digital without the damned gimmicks.
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Old 12-16-2012   #29
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Digital sure has made it too easy. It seems everyone with $500 to buy a DSLR has taken up being a "professional" photographer as either a side job for those who are terrible at it or means of career change for those who actually have a knack for it. An easy way to live the dream and be your own boss.

Digital isn't entirely without its difficulties. In the beginning the early photographers were also chemists. Because you needed to know chemistry to be a photographer. The technical portion of photography is still there today however now it's computers and electronics you need to understand instead of chemistry.
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Old 12-16-2012   #30
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Mais Oui, Mais Non...
Its really not that hard in getting a fairly Good shot anymore

I suppose the real 'Talent' lies in Finding the shot & Framing it
and possibly Post processing (if needed)
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Old 12-16-2012   #31
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The OP's 'then' and 'now' equation is, of course part and parcel of the incredibly boring film vs. digital debate. No thanks. Let's make some pictures! Cheers, P
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Old 12-16-2012   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshapero View Post
Digital photography, for me, is not really a problem; it's all the automation that usually comes with it. Take all the dozens of auto-focus settings on my Nikon D7000. Ridiculous. Yes this definitely takes away the pleasure. I would think that shooting an M-9 would be a real pleasure.
I feel something similar about all the 'features' that manufacturers keep adding to camera bodies in order to make the newest models desirable. But its also true that all these cameras can be simplified (refined in my opinion) to a great degree by turning off everything that takes a decision-making process away from the photographer. For example, my D7000 is set up as a manual focus, spot meter body with auto ISO turned off. And I use manual focus lenses on it. In this set-up, the camera feels somewhat like an older F-style film Nikon.

I'll also admit that when the situation calls for it, its nice to know I can turn the all the automatic features ON and blast away. Normally this occurs at family get-togethers when I have a cocktail in one hand, the camera in the other, and I don't want to think about metering or focusing at all.
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Old 12-16-2012   #33
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The cameras and software these days invite tinkering. There are tons of possible settings and an equal amounts of information constantly pouring forth from screens and finders. But is it really _simpler_ to work with all this information and controls compared to using a mechanical camera with a meter and knobs for shutter speed, aperture and focus, provided that you have experience with the basics? I don't think simpler is the right word. More reassuring (you get instant feedback) and flexible - but not simpler.

There are genres where the ability to fine-tune each and every setting is very useful - e.g. macrophotography, difficult studio setups, architecture... But for general human-scale documentary stuff it's superfluous and distracting, IMO. And this goes for both the shooting experience and editing/post-processing. Too easy to get caught in the numbers, histograms and pixel peeping - and miss the peak emotion or best composition.
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Old 12-16-2012   #34
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Obviously it has made it easier to take an image, not that it has made the 'seeing' part of photography any easier, instant review has made the whole process instantaneous and the barrier to producing technically high quality output is way lower.
That is a good thing!
Progress like TTL metering made getting better exposures easier, auto focus made for less out of focus images etc.
Digital is just a progression in the evolution of photography.

It has given many people a huge amount of control over their images, decent colour printing was something that was beyond all but the most serious amateur, and even many professionals would balk at having to make contrast or un-sharp masks–all now incredibly easy and with a level of control outside of what a handful of people could do before the advent of digital.

So yes it has become easier, just as 1HR minilabs boosted the use of colour negative, all those improvements just like digital are a good thing.
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Old 12-16-2012   #35
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Certainly it has become easier. But is it as personally satisfying? It is broader than just digital. The Nikon F6 or Canon 1V are sophisticated, computer controlled film cameras. Has the increasing sophistication of cameras made any difference in your personal satisfaction with photography?
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Old 12-16-2012   #36
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Another thing that affects the pleasure we derive from photography is how we first view our work. With digital, you tend to get a rundown of your mistakes first: you can zoom to 400% in a second and see that you've missed focus a bit, then there's the clipped highlight blinking red, and oh dear, is that sensor dust? Raw files can look especially dreary before you've applied any adjustments.

With a contact sheet or small proof prints, you see the potential first and the minor defects are hidden until you examine the negative closer or make a larger print. This gives you a better chance to bond with your work, which apparently some people are in dire need of.
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Old 12-16-2012   #37
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Digital hasn't made choosing content and framing content any easier.
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Old 12-16-2012   #38
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Using a grain focusing device to focus the enlarger gave me a real understanding of how badly slow, handheld shutter speeds and wide open apertures destroyed sharpness in photos. Kind of the same experience as viewing digital files at 400 percent.
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Old 12-16-2012   #39
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Quote:
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Certainly it has become easier. But is it as personally satisfying? It is broader than just digital. The Nikon F6 or Canon 1V are sophisticated, computer controlled film cameras. Has the increasing sophistication of cameras made any difference in your personal satisfaction with photography?
Personal satisfaction is harder to quantify, I find huge amount of satisfaction in printing my images, but then i always did even in the days of film.
One thing I think is important to me is when I use film I find it more hands on less rushed and certainly less transient.
That's because I like the hands on feeling of printmaking, its more labour intensive and harder to achieve excellent results and that for me makes those results have a higher value.
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Old 12-16-2012   #40
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Quoting myself from one of your other threads, PW...

...Yes, the easy part of photography is now easier. But, the hard part is still just as hard as ever. That hard part is not HOW to make the picture, but rather WHAT picture to make.

Digital has not reduced any of the fun for me. It has reduced some of the un-fun (developing film for instance).

Photography has never been technically difficult. At least not since dry plates came along in the late 19th century.

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