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Old 01-27-2016   #42
aoresteen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichC View Post
Lots of moaning! <eye roll>

....

And what's wrong with auto-updates? ....

Case in point (and a warning to those still using Windows XP): Windows XP is obsolete - it came out in 2002, and Microsoft stopped support 2 years ago (including updates to fix security breaches). So, not only won't a lot of current programs and hardware work but you're far more likely to become infected with viruses and malware. It's no accident that of all the versions of Windows, XP is by far the most riddled with viruses and worms: in one recent instance, 50% of the computers powering a major attack were running XP (http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows...l-these-years/)!

......
There's lots wrong with auto updates. I can't tell you how many times I had to have my IT staff back out a MicroSoft update that had serious problems. Even after testing them there were many problems that took some time to manifest themselves and had to be backed out.

As to XP there are lots of 3rd parties still supporting it and providing security updates. AVG & Zemana still support XP with effective security products. And Microsoft still puts out a patch or two for XP. The last security patch for XP put out by Microsfoft was on Sep 22 2015.

I have a lot of SCSI hardware & recording interfaces/hardware that will not run under Vista or later so I stay on XP SP3. It would take over $4,000 to upgrade my hardware to Windows 7/8 compatible harware and for a couple of items there is no upgrade.

The people that get viruses under XP are the same ones who get them under Win 7 & Win 8. They don't run any AV software or update it, they click on any link, they open any attachment, they don't run a firewall, and they visit malware sites. As a retired IT person I have spent hours cleaning up Windows 7 machines for friends & family that are far less secure than my XP machines. I run a firewall for my home network and enforce security rules. Windows XP is not obsolete; Microsoft can't make any money supporting it so they spread FUD and try to sell you a new OS. Well, it is obsolete from a REVENUE perspective but it still works just fine.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #43
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I have W 8 and did't want to upgrade.
Once after leaving the PC unattended I found it in the process of upgrading.
To roll back Microsoft forced me to wait 1 month. During this month I hated W10 with all my mind and heart.
Once back in W8 I disabled upgrades
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #44
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This is not to say that I like W8.
But W10 is much worse
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #45
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I have Windows 10 and it works fine, but upon installing I did lose a couple of old music programs that now don't work. Be careful!
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #46
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I just went back to my XP pro yesterday. Installed Avast Pro and Firewall up and running too. A lot of Anti Virus firms do not support it. I did have Trend Micro on one and it no longer supports XP, but very happy today with the XP back up.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #47
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I still have an XP laptop, and another one with 7. Both run fine, and have antivirus programs on them that update automatically.
My new computer has 10. Bloated piece of XXXX!

First thing you need to do is go to the security settings, and turn off all the keylogging and automatic data sendback to Microsoft (aka the CIA). See details here:
http://www.silverdoctors.com/headlin...ft/#more-77351
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #48
lawrence
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If like me you are perfectly happy with Windows 7 you can always turn off that annoying Win 10 upgrade reminder by going to Gibson Research and downloading their fix: https://www.grc.com/never10.htm
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichC View Post
Lots of moaning! <eye roll>

I've been a Windows user since the mid-90s and Windows 3.1, and am now using Windows 10 without a hitch after upgrading from Windows 7. Took a little while to get used to it - like moving to a new home! - but I'm happy: it's sleeker and snappier than Windows 7.

Before upgrading, I made sensible preparations: I checked that drivers were available (or a workaround) for all my hardware - no problems, not even for the decade-old Spyder2 monitor profiler or my even older (1997!) and trusty HP LaserJet printer! Ditto important software: I occasionally need to use Ventura 10, an ancient DTP program that came out 14 years ago - with a little tinkering during installation, it runs fine; even Vern 2, a little utility dating from 1998 I love performs without a hitch!

If Windows 10, your software or hardware isn't working properly, then the problem's likely not Windows but at your end: a broken Windows 7 resulting in a buggy update, or very old (i.e. incompatible) hardware or software.

Like its predecessors, the way Windows 10 works can be customised to your taste (much more so than OS X), so if you don't like something you can probably change it...

And what's wrong with auto-updates? Seems sensible to me. These aren't frivolous, and Windows updates fix bugs, improve features and sort out security flaws. Why wouldn't you not want that!? Hopefully, auto-updates will eventually mean fewer viruses and malware around to attack us because idiots haven't updated their computers! I've let Windows install updates for years - because it'd be stupid not to.

Case in point (and a warning to those still using Windows XP): Windows XP is obsolete - it came out in 2002, and Microsoft stopped support 2 years ago (including updates to fix security breaches). So, not only won't a lot of current programs and hardware work but you're far more likely to become infected with viruses and malware. It's no accident that of all the versions of Windows, XP is by far the most riddled with viruses and worms: in one recent instance, 50% of the computers powering a major attack were running XP (http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows...l-these-years/)!

Computers aren't like old cameras, to be cherished and handed on. They're disposable and have a use by date.

Go on, chuck that old system. It's gone crusty and is smelling a little ripe...!
Same here - I've never had a problem. I know what goes in - and comes out of my system within reason. Back up your systems regularly, if something goes wrong - restore from your Windows Image Backup. Etc, etc. Upgrade - don't just think "she'll be right mate"...

If computers ain't your thing, then it requires effort, reading to keep up to date and to understand the operating system.

From the time I've been running Windows from 1998 - I've only had ONE device die - the graphics card. I've had only 3 systems until now. The current system I've had since Vista was upgraded to Win 7, then Win 8 to 8.1 and then upgraded to Windows 10 - not glitches, no problems. I've had my current system since 2007 running an Intel Quad Core Q82000 and Lightroom.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #50
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At some point, just disconnect it from the internet.

I hope you cloned the disk so you can put it on a new computer or new drive.

Now buy some cheep one to do all your mail etc
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #51
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Microsoft has been working with W10 now well over a year, would be surprised if its still such a source of problems some make it to be.

btw. Android overtook Windows recently as most popular operating system. Microsoft is under growing pressure of how to find way forward, as tradition PCs and laptops are becoming less popular.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #52
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The deciding factor for me in the end was that I couldn't disable automatic updates ... that really doesn't do it for me sorry. In the short time I used it it did work ok though!
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronald M View Post
At some point, just disconnect it from the internet.

I hope you cloned the disk so you can put it on a new computer or new drive.

Now buy some cheep one to do all your mail etc
Sage advice.

Old OS is usually not secure. While this is dinished by third-party solutions, the risk increases.

Obviously the main concern is protecting your data and information. A second concern is being an unwilling host to zombieware.

When using older OS versions it is essential to have copies of your irreplaceable data (image files) on a separate storage device that is never connected to the internet. This is the only complete protection against ransomware. Copies on mainstream Cloud storage is almost as good if the Cloud file system is only active on your computer when you move data back and forth.

For internet-based usage using a client-servr based approach such as a Chrome Book affords protection from malware because thin clients don't run executable programs. Malware can attack via Chrome Extensions. But unlike malware in executables (.EXE) Extensions can simply be turned off. Cleaning Extensions is much simpler as well. Sometimes even a simple reboot eliminates the problem.

Newer Chromebooks can be run in both thin client mode or using Android Apps in off-line mode.
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