Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Coffee With Mentors > Roger Hicks -- Author of The Rangefinder Book

Roger Hicks -- Author of The Rangefinder Book

Roger Hicks is a well known photographic writer, author of The Rangefinder Book, over three dozen other photographic books, and a frequent contributor to Shutterbug and Amateur Photographer. Unusually in today's photographic world, most of his camera reviews are film cameras, especially rangefinders. See www.rogerandfrances.com for further background (Frances is his wife Frances Schultz, acknowledged darkroom addict and fellow Shutterbug contributor) .


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Efficiency and ergonomics
Old 02-17-2017   #1
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,106
Efficiency and ergonomics

What do you understand by these terms? This new, short piece starts with log splitting and moves on to how you control the aperture on a lens.

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Go to www.rogerandfrances.eu for a whole new website
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #2
oftheherd
Registered User
 
oftheherd's Avatar
 
oftheherd is offline
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 7,589
Mr. Hicks,

Interesting article. I wonder if efficiency should be further explained? Or perhaps that was part of you intent, to expand on possible answers based on different definitions of efficiency? In the paragraph below, wouldn't one need to know as opposed to what, that made your actions more efficient?

Because part of the reason I split wood is for the exercise. If I have to keep lifting and bringing down the hammer; if I keep having to knock the top of the wedge sideways, to re-align it; if from time to time I knock the log, with the wedge embedded in it, off the chopping block on which I cut it (the only reason it is on the log pile as shown here is artistic license), so that I have to have to pick it up and replace it on the block; well, that's more exercise. I just don't need as many split logs as I could easily make with the straight-grained ones, so from the point of view of exercise, the slower, more difficult logs are more efficient. The two definitions of "efficiency" are pretty much diametrically opposed.

I think your last sentence agrees with that. Am I wrong?
__________________
My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #3
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,106
Quote:
Originally Posted by oftheherd View Post
. .. I think your last sentence agrees with that. Am I wrong?
You're absolutely right. As I say at the beginning, "efficiency" must refer to what you are trying to do. To pretend that it has any meaning on its own is feeble-minded. For example, I read recently that Holland was one of the most "efficient" countries in the world. What, if anything, would that mean? Don't ask Geert Wilders, the far-right Dutch politician, for a start...

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Go to www.rogerandfrances.eu for a whole new website
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #4
nikonhswebmaster
Moderator NHS Forum
 
nikonhswebmaster's Avatar
 
nikonhswebmaster is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 344
Interesting Roger.

I have often thought about efficiency and exercise, when recommending a bicycle for someone. One can buy a 15 pound bike, or spend far less and buy a 40 pound bike. On the face of it the 40 pound bike would seem more efficient for exercise, but less so for going a long distance.

But my experience is that the light bike makes up for burning less calories, by being more enjoyable, and therefore more likely to be used. But if the bike is too light, it will be so expensive that the rider will worry about taking it shopping, and the like, and not use it.

Of course the best choice probably lies in the "middle" somewhere? Unless of course, one goes the way of the RFF "GAS" and buys two or three bikes.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #5
Peter Wijninga
Registered User
 
Peter Wijninga's Avatar
 
Peter Wijninga is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Ho Chi Minh City
Posts: 2,991
Quote:
But if the bike is too light, it will be so expensive that the rider will worry about taking it shopping, and the like, and not use it.
.....or buy a 10 pound chain to secure it with ;-)
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #6
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,106
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikonhswebmaster View Post
Interesting Roger.

I have often thought about efficiency and exercise, when recommending a bicycle for someone. One can buy a 15 pound bike, or spend far less and buy a 40 pound bike. On the face of it the 40 pound bike would seem more efficient for exercise, but less so for going a long distance.

But my experience is that the light bike makes up for burning less calories, by being more enjoyable, and therefore more likely to be used. But if the bike is too light, it will be so expensive that the rider will worry about taking it shopping, and the like, and not use it.

Of course the best choice probably lies in the "middle" somewhere? Unless of course, one goes the way of the RFF "GAS" and buys two or three bikes.
Yes, I've often thought the same thing. One of my friends did in fact buy the heaviest bicycle he could easily find, using precisely this logic; but I totally agree that there comes a point where you just can't face riding the damn' thing. My own bike probably weighs about 25 lb, with rack and panniers, but it's an 18-speed all-terrain Overbury's Fell Rider and although I very rarely ride it truly off road, I do ride on unmade roads and farm tracks, so it's an excellent compromise for me.

And Frances and I may indeed be on the point of buying another bicycle each (she also has an Overbury's), just to go to Arles: ultra-cheap clunkers from Emmaus, a charity shop. We'd not be riding far, and a bicycle trailer would just about carry enough pictures for an exhibition. We could then take the car; park it a mile or so outside the city centre (parking is more and more difficult); and use the bicycles while we're there. Or we may just forget about an exhibition and take the motorcycle.

Cheers,

R.
__________________
Go to www.rogerandfrances.eu for a whole new website
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #7
nikonhswebmaster
Moderator NHS Forum
 
nikonhswebmaster's Avatar
 
nikonhswebmaster is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 344
Roger I noticed your bike in one of your photos.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #8
charjohncarter
Registered User
 
charjohncarter's Avatar
 
charjohncarter is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Danville, CA, USA
Posts: 7,493
Well, I certainly agree with you, an aperture ring is what I like best, and I'll add to that; I like a shutter dial also. Here is the most efficient way I found to split wood, just wait around until Hal does it: 1964.

1964 by John Carter, on Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #9
Spicy
Registered User
 
Spicy is offline
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: DC
Age: 30
Posts: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by charjohncarter View Post
Here is the most efficient way I found to split wood, just wait around until Hal does it: 1964.

This is always the optimal solution haha
__________________
ID7P0M2F854Ior+50PdV3MSFcC05MNC00
[:] [']
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #10
Peter Wijninga
Registered User
 
Peter Wijninga's Avatar
 
Peter Wijninga is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Ho Chi Minh City
Posts: 2,991
Consider buying an electric assisted bike. The ones made in Holland are very ''efficient''.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #11
venchka
Registered User
 
venchka's Avatar
 
venchka is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 71
Posts: 6,211
Look at an elevation profile of The Netherlands.
Does the electric motor and necessary hardware make up for it's own weight? What happens when the battery is dead? Just like the silly electric cars beyond city limits.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Wayne
Deep in the darkest heart of the East Texas Rain forest.
Quote:
"Leave me alone, I know what I'm doing" Kimi Raikkonen
My Gallery
My Blog-Reborn
FlickrMyBookTwitSpaceFace
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #12
sevo
Fokutorendaburando
 
sevo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Frankfurt, Germany
Posts: 6,246
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikonhswebmaster View Post
Interesting Roger.

I have often thought about efficiency and exercise, when recommending a bicycle for someone. One can buy a 15 pound bike, or spend far less and buy a 40 pound bike. On the face of it the 40 pound bike would seem more efficient for exercise, but less so for going a long distance.
It really depends on the purpose. In flat terrain, weight does not really matter, once accelerated, it is all wind and roll resistance. Most of my city bikes tend towards mid weight, as they are everyday tools and it is pretty flat here. There is not much point in going below 24 pounds if I pack another 30 pounds shopping on it - lighter ones often have a permitted total load that won't even permit twenty extra pounds, and feel pretty wobbly in that condition. Even in the country house (right next to a hill castle, with a 18% ascent) I split between a very light rigid mountain bike ("the Uphill") for fun and a quite heavy one that can tow a trailer bike, my son and a few day's worth of shopping.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #13
Ko.Fe.
Me. Write ESL. Ko.
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Age: 50
Posts: 4,244
Where I'm most sufficient way to get logs done for entire heating season is to rent good slitter for under 100$ and get it done in one day.

Our you could do it Latvian way:
https://rutube.ru/video/b90ee4ded500...33d1060b2826c/

And this is Russian most ergonomic and sufficient way if you insist on doing it with less tools, but more hands:
https://rutube.ru/video/e868df9d8b6a...07f0f147c75f8/
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #14
davidnewtonguitars
Family Snaps
 
davidnewtonguitars's Avatar
 
davidnewtonguitars is offline
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Beaumont, TX
Posts: 359
Funny how on a film/rangefinder forum a discussion of efficiency begins with splitting logs and goes directly to riding bicycles. It is as if most of the readers have split / still split logs, and have ridden / still ride their bicycle.

I build my guitars with as few power tools as possible, and consider it more efficient, for what I am doing, the most efficient and best way.

Of course "the best way" enters the realm of Religion & Politics.
__________________
Leica IIIc /Leica Ie
5cm Elmar / 5cm Summitar
Zorki-1 / 5cm I-22
http://davidnewtonguitars.squarespace.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #15
tom.w.bn
Registered User
 
tom.w.bn is offline
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 2,670
Setting the aperture on the lens is a straightforward thing to do but I don't think it's the most ergonomic way to do it. For ergonomics it's important that you can set the aperture in every situation and you can always see what aperture you have set.

With a Leica M you never get a feedback in the viewfinder about the aperture. When I want to change aperture while looking through the viewfinder I always go through this mind exercise: Zeiss -> 3 clicks to the next full aperture, Leica -> 2 clicks to the next full aperture. And at night you have no chance to see the aperture without a torch. I need this because I'm out after dark with camera on the tripod fairly often.

With most professional cameras you set the aperture via a dial (thumb or forefinger) and get a constant feedback with the shoulder display and in the viewfinder. AFAIK Fuji is the only maker that has an aperture ring on the lens. Had these and I don't think it's an advantage. Just a bit more retro feeling. The Fuji GFX is interesting again because it has a shoulder display again in contrast to the Fuji X cameras.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2017   #16
sevo
Fokutorendaburando
 
sevo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Frankfurt, Germany
Posts: 6,246
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom.w.bn View Post
With most professional cameras you set the aperture via a dial (thumb or forefinger) and get a constant feedback with the shoulder display and in the viewfinder.
Or you set the aperture via the aperture ring and got a constant feedback through a window in the finder - that was pro state of the art by the mid sixties and generally common by the seventies. Leica somehow missed out on a in-camera aperture display when everybody else grew one - if they had not stepped backwards in development, a M5 successor would probably have had it...
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 21:13.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.