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Developing 1 at a time
Old 01-30-2016   #1
clcolucci58
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Developing 1 at a time

I like doing one 4x5 sheet at a time don't really want to get into multi sheet processing but I do want to was all 4-6 sheet at one time. If I were to l leave the film in hypo and develop another sheet leave it it the hypo do another sheet etc..then wash the sheets after all have been developed. Sitting in hypo for 30-35 min. Would this have an affect on the film? As always thanks to all for the insight and advice.

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Chris
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Old 01-30-2016   #2
x-ray
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Rapid fix would possibly bleach the film to some degree and regular non rapid fix could bleach the film. Try a test if in doubt. Expose two sheets at exactly the same exposure and process them together not seperate. Fix one normal and one for 30-45 minutes. Compare them after they dry. Personally I wouldn't do it. I'd fix normally and put in a holding tray of water. You might even put a little hypo clearing agent in the holding tray.

If the fixer does bleach the film it'll show in the shadows first.
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Old 01-30-2016   #3
gns
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I don't think you can over-fix the film. So, it's ok to leave sheets in the final fix while you process others.
Why do you want to do them 1 at a time? Are you tray processing?
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Old 01-30-2016   #4
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I agree with x-ray... The fixer tends to bleach with longer times. Better to put the sheets in a holding tray with hypo clearing agent (I have added a bit of selenium toner too at this step for archival purposes).
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Old 01-30-2016   #5
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I should have said, I don't think you can over-fix film in 30-45 minutes. As Xray suggested, do a test, or if you are worried about it, move the fixed film to a water holding tray.
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Old 01-30-2016   #6
clcolucci58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gns View Post
I don't think you can over-fix the film. So, it's ok to leave sheets in the final fix while you process others.
Why do you want to do them 1 at a time? Are you tray processing?
Yes tray processing
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Old 01-30-2016   #7
clcolucci58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray View Post
Rapid fix would possibly bleach the film to some degree and regular non rapid fix could bleach the film. Try a test if in doubt. Expose two sheets at exactly the same exposure and process them together not seperate. Fix one normal and one for 30-45 minutes. Compare them after they dry. Personally I wouldn't do it. I'd fix normally and put in a holding tray of water. You might even put a little hypo clearing agent in the holding tray.

If the fixer does bleach the film it'll show in the shadows first.
Water holding tray w/small amount of hypo clearing agent. Thanks.
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Old 01-30-2016   #8
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Selenium toner will intensify a negative. This was a trick used by Ansel to intensify and build contrast. Highlights will build density faster than shadows resulting in increased contrast. I've used this technique a few times. You can gain about a grade of contrast. A brief bath of very dilute selenium won't hurt but the film needs to be fixed, hypo cleared and washed properly first otherwise it may cause stains or uneven toning. I honestly see no point in it.
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Old 01-30-2016   #9
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Well, at the weak dilution I used in the hypo clearing bath there was little visible effect on the negs, and it was just out of having read a recommendation that suggested this use of selenium was beneficial for archival storage.
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Old 01-31-2016   #10
clcolucci58
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Just to clarify my process is as follows: D76 1:1, stop bath, fixer, hypo clearing then wash for 10 min. Start process again with next sheet till all four are developed (I shoot four sheets at a time when I take the Toya D45 out) I was thinking I can leave the sheets in the hypo clearing till wash time so I'm washing all four at the same time but the the point of having film in a holding bath it the answer. My apologies if I did not clarify correctly, and thanks to all for the info and insight.
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Chris
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