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Old 05-02-2012   #81
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I have to admit I feel a slight resentment myself when I get photographed on the streets of my neighbourhood. Sure, it's legal, and everybody has a right to do it. But I think I feel kind of the same way about being photographed as when somebody stares at me.
Obviously there is nothing illegal about staring at people on the street, but I do think many people would think it impolite when you stare at somebody. Staring being more than just looking or glancing btw.
Same thing with photography. When somebody targets me with his or her camera I feel like I'm getting stared at (and in a way pointed at). And basically in a sense he will at some point stare at me even if the act of taking the picture takes only a moment. During development he will certainly stare at my image. And maybe he will in a way point at me when he posts my image on the internet, maybe even adding a comment like "weird guy who sat across from me on a streetbench yesterday".

Now, if a real artist/ real photographer would somehow use my being in his pictures to make something beautiful, but 99% of the time it will turn out to be just another b&w random shot of what you can see on the street everyday anyway.

I think most of us here have some sort of voyeurism thing going on, which in itself is ok. But expecting the people not to complain about getting stared and pointed at in the name of his so called street photography is stretching it a bit. And yes, in the name of art and beauty it is sometimes necessary to hurt some feelings or to be a little impolite, but let's at least feel a little ashamed about it ourselves so that our subjects arent the only ones suffering in the name of art.
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Old 05-02-2012   #82
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It's a difficult time in a difficult world ...times dictate the way you approach your subject. Honestly until short time ago I was 100% sure to be on the right side when taking photos of strangers on the street, but I always tried not to take photo without respecting them. But now, with the increasing capacity of faces recognition softwares it would disturb me to see my pictures posted in the net (without my permission). As consequence I understand other people do not like their photo to be taken.
I'm trying to ask people if I can take there portraits and in some cases it works.
Just my idea, sorry if not shared by the majority.
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Old 05-03-2012   #83
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thanks your emplement.
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Old 05-03-2012   #84
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I don’t know what freaky thing the street photographer will do with my image and for this reason I’m uncomfortable with my image taken.
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Old 05-03-2012   #85
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I donít know what freaky thing the street photographer will do with my image and for this reason Iím uncomfortable with my image taken.
How freaky is it gonna get? In other words, why worry?

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Old 05-03-2012   #86
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Now, if a real artist/ real photographer would somehow use my being in his pictures to make something beautiful, but 99% of the time it will turn out to be just another b&w random shot of what you can see on the street everyday anyway.
Sturgeon's Law. (To those not familiar with Sturgeon's Law, Google it).

If I were too paranoid, or so completely lacking in a sense off humour, as to object to being photographed on the street, it would be time to top myself. I do sometimes suffer from depression, but not over being photographed on the street. As the old joke has it, "I may be crazy, but I'm not stupid."

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Old 05-03-2012   #87
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Quote:
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If I were too paranoid, or so completely lacking in a sense off humour, as to object to being photographed on the street, it would be time to top myself. I do sometimes suffer from depression, but not over being photographed on the street. As the old joke has it, "I may be crazy, but I'm not stupid."
I don't quite understand how you think a discussion of this topic is helped by such (I presume/I hope) exaggerations as "too paranoid", "lacking a sense of humor" and "I would top myself". I would say this topic needs subtlety and nuance. It's a grey area, instead of a black/white area.
In my post I talked about feeling a "slight resentment" and then proceeded to try and further characterize my resentment. Maybe you think my resentment comes only from paranoia or lack of humor (though I fail to see how humor plays a part in this)?

Anyway, many great street photographers point out the need for a subtle approach to photographing people and respecting the people you photograph. Like I said, I doubt I would mind so much being photographed by them if it would help their art. But I'm quite sure I resent being photographed by a photographer who's approach embodies the attitude of "if you don't like me photographing you, it must be because you're paranoid or lack humor, and you should commit suicide".

Hmmm writing this post, I guess I do see how you contribute to this discussion, in the sense that it now seems obvious to me that there is a subtle polite way to approach a subject, and there is a overbearing crude way to approach a subject. This applies to the art street photography as much as the art of having an internet forum discussion.
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Old 05-03-2012   #88
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...let's not forget that some people just can't be dealt with. I was walking by a mental health resource centre in Toronto with a camera in my hand by my side, not even taking a photograph or even looking like I was going to take one. A woman on a bench yelled something, but I didn't know it was directed at me. Then I was crossing the street to a restaurant and looked back and she was chasing me! I stopped and turned around in the middle of the road and told her I wasn't taking her picture. She accepted and walked away. I went and sat down on the patio, ordered a beer with my date and put the camera on the table. I looked to my right and she was sitting on the bench glaring at me. My camera was pointed at her sitting on the table, which was my big mistake. She came right into the restaurant and started yelling at me. Staff did nothing. I told her that she needed to leave immediately and stop bugging me. She didn't. She said that I was going to give the photo to the cops and have her arrested again, that I was spying on her and trying to ruin her life. I told her this was not the case and she needed to leave immediately. After that I turned my chair with my back to her, put the camera in the bag and she left. Sometimes you get people who have various mental health issues and I should have known better as I work at a shelter that the best thing to do would have been to put the camera away and continue walking to a different restaurant out of site. Your approach will certainly depend on who confronts you.
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Old 05-12-2012   #89
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This is a tricky topic and I have strayed at times, I'm not sure what to think.
I don't know if this is interesting - anyway here goes - I was in Hong Kong some time back, it's a very photogenic city, crowded, colourful, cheap equipment, food etc.
I noticed a guy carrying a couple of Nikons, he'd had spotted an elderly local crouching against a wall. The photographer, wearing a bandana looking scruffy - maybe he'd seen Dennis Hopper in Apocalypse Now, crept up very close to this guy, lens about a foot from his face while he was looking away. Suddenly the Chinaman noticed this camera, sprang up shouting, jumping about waving his arms, extremely upset. The photographer was also surprised, humbled and backed off.
He'd invaded this strangers personal space to a ridiculous degree, I don't know what he was thinking.

There are many photos of elderly wrinkled people, mostly weatherbeaten and poor, Tibetan or both which are easily found in the likes of National Geographic mags, Steve Mc Curry books etc.
Some photographers wish they could go home with a few pics that get close to these very professional shots.
Usually we see the subjects face staring back at us in these books, confident, right into the lens, not falling over trying to get away from it.

I feel a photographer that does not respect the dignity of a subject is stepping too far.
If a person in the pic is made to look stupid, for what ever reason, that's too far.
If the person looks unusual, maybe dressed in an unusual way, they might like being seen. A photographer has to make a judgement, only they know if it feels right. If it doesn't why take the shot?
I know why - because that situation will never happen again and it will become the pic you keep in your minds eye - 'the one that got away'.
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Old 05-12-2012   #90
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Thanks. I'll be on the lookout for that ****. Nikon you say?
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Old 05-12-2012   #91
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Two days ago I was walking through a narrow alley I often pass through. There was interesting light falling on the brick, and nice contrast between a deep red section of painted-over board and a bit of blue paint from a fading tag. There was Velvia in my camera and I thought it was worth a shot.

As I was taking this photo of - wait for it - a F-CKING BRICK WALL - a guy came running across the street. "What are you doing?! What's going on?"

I replied, "I'm taking a photo - of this brick wall".

It turned out he was the owner of the building. Something about his demeanor, which seemed a little frazzled, took the edge off any hard feelings. I told him I was not with the city, insurance company, etc, just taking a photo for my own enjoyment.

Later that day I was coming back through the alley. What do I see but a well-dressed man with a DSLR, taking photos of the same wall! I laughed and said "Thank God I'm not the only one. I shot the wall today too!" But he didn't seem very amused, in fact a little uncomfortable.

Moral: Sometimes a bizarre reaction may have a rational basis.

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Old 05-12-2012   #92
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I'm not comfortable shooting street photography. I've come to realize it's because I very much dislike having my own photo taken, so I project that onto everyone else. However, I've tried to get better at it in the last year or so, and I really believe a photographer that acts confident is less intimidating than one that acts "stealthy" (often seen as sneaky, even if not the same).

My daughter is taken a photography unit it school. For an assignment she wanted to get a photo of another teen (she didn't know him) down at a pier we go to often. She was acting all sneaky and "stealthy"... and I proceeded to tell her later that she would have been better off just holding the camera up to her face and trying to get the shot. When you act sneaky, you look like you're doing something you're not supposed to be doing, inevitably. But that's just my opinion.

I also think, generally speaking, the photographers that are confident and unhidden, the ones who use wider lenses (not 300mm zooms), get better street shots. There's exceptions, but just generally. At least I know I get better street shots when both things are true.

A year or so ago I was taking a photo of a bike... no people around. From out of nowhere a woman ran across the street and starting feverishly questioning me on why I was taking a picture of her bike. I told her I just thought it was a nice bike. She went into a diatribe about how people can't be too careful, and you never know what will happen and she didn't want to get a ticket and go to jail. She was eventually satisfied I was harmless.

Objects or people, I usually don't shoot or keep the photo if there are objections... if it were me objecting, I'd want the photographer to honor my wishes, so I pay them the same respect. That's just for me though -- I don't think everyone has to follow that rule... it's up to them.

And, I've taken to carrying those little mini-business cards (even though I'm nobody - LOL) just for these types of occasions. It diffuses the situation usually when a person feels like you're somehow legitimate and willing to share the resulting photo with them. I get them super cheap and it's like carrying a pack of gum in your pocket.
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Old 05-29-2012   #93
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I came across some good info in regards to this just recently, never had the problem myself but I think I would respond in the following way:

Explain why I'm taking photos (don't lie), offer to show them the photo and email a copy. Look them in the eyes when talking to them (important). If they really want me to delete it, I'll just delete it (what are the chances it would be that one in a million shot anyway? Very slim.)

If you can't offer a legitimate reason as to why you took their photo, you probably have no business doing so.

I would definitely not take an aggressive approach, you never know who you're dealing with. Someone could be on the lam, etc.
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Old 05-29-2012   #94
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ive been shooting people point blank on the street and nobody has yet to confront me.. if i see someone who looks like they would be aggressive, i normally ask first and then have them walk as if i wasnt taking their photo.. of course this isnt 100% natural but many people cant tell a staged shot from a real one anyways.
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Old 06-23-2012   #95
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On the one hand, I know I am legally allowed to take pictures of anything I like on the street but how do you handle these situations??? This really puts me off street shooting and has tainted my confidence...
you are of course NOT legally allowed to just take pictures of anyone without their consent, since that constitutes a violation of their personality rights. imagine someone walks over and kisses you on the mouth without first asking you if you like that.

The predominant point of reference, is that any publication of a portrait photograph requires consent [of the person depicted]. The reasoning for this, is that such a publication might provide the depicted person with discomfort, possibly with other information such as name, of the publication for all with access to the internet, and the considerations of this discomfort is judged as more important than a possible interest in publication.

sorry to burst your bubble.
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Old 06-23-2012   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cameosis View Post
you are of course NOT legally allowed to just take pictures of anyone without their consent, since that constitutes a violation of their personality rights. imagine someone walks over and kisses you on the mouth without first asking you if you like that.

The predominant point of reference, is that any publication of a portrait photograph requires consent [of the person depicted]. The reasoning for this, is that such a publication might provide the depicted person with discomfort, possibly with other information such as name, of the publication for all with access to the internet, and the considerations of this discomfort is judged as more important than a possible interest in publication.

sorry to burst your bubble.
Where are you from? In most of the world, you certainly can take a picture of anything or anyone in public wherever they have no reasonable expectation of privacy. You can't follow someone into a public toilet booth and shoot them on the john, but you can photograph them entering or leaving the building, on the sidewalk or the street, at the market, in their car, in their front yard so long as you are shooting from a public space, etc. Provided you aren't engaged in commercial activity, you don't need their consent, either.

There are some exceptions, for example some government installations may not allow photography in or about their premises. Often property owners will try to convince you that you can't photograph their building without their consent, but they are wrong.

Naturally, just because it is legal doesn' t mean you should always take the shot. If you go to a playground and start photographing children, you're almost certainly going to be confonted by hysterical parents, at the very minimum.

There's no such thing as personality rights.
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Old 06-23-2012   #97
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Quote:
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you are of course NOT legally allowed to just take pictures of anyone without their consent, since that constitutes a violation of their personality rights. imagine someone walks over and kisses you on the mouth without first asking you if you like that.

sorry to burst your bubble.
My my, it's about high time we go after that dirty old French man, Bresson they called him. He had been sexually assaulting the citizens of the world for years! Even if he is dead, we can at least post-humously give him a record!
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Old 06-23-2012   #98
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The predominant point of reference, is that any publication of a portrait photograph requires consent [of the person depicted].
This is not the case in most of the world, may be except France and Germany. Even in Bulgaria, where I am from, a law was passed a couple of years ago which states that you don't need to ask for consent in a public place.

A few people here are aware of this law anyway, but it's good to know the law is on your side if worse comes to worst.
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Old 06-23-2012   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cameosis View Post
you are of course NOT legally allowed to just take pictures of anyone without their consent, since that constitutes a violation of their personality rights. imagine someone walks over and kisses you on the mouth without first asking you if you like that.

The predominant point of reference, is that any publication of a portrait photograph requires consent [of the person depicted]. The reasoning for this, is that such a publication might provide the depicted person with discomfort, possibly with other information such as name, of the publication for all with access to the internet, and the considerations of this discomfort is judged as more important than a possible interest in publication.

sorry to burst your bubble.
Interesting . I assume you are referring to Denmark and laws that apply within Denmark.

From http://www.enotes.com/topic/Personality_rights (and noting I do not know whether this site is authoritative) :
"In Denmark the Danish Penal Code chapters 26 and 27, provides certain personality rights. The governmental Danish Data Protection Agency, has made a declaration regarding publication on the Internet of pictures taken of persons in a public area[2]:

The predominant point of reference, is that any publication of a portrait photograph requires consent [of the person depicted]. The reasoning for this, is that such a publication might provide the depicted person with discomfort, possibly with other information such as name, of the publication for all with access to the internet, and the considerations of this discomfort is judged as more important than a possible interest in publication.

A portrait photograph is defined as a photograph, with the purpose of depicting one or more specific person(s). The personality rights however may be contracted for persons who are generally accepted as public persons."
This must make it difficult for people in Denmark. I presume that one is allowed to distinguish between the act of taking a photo and the act of publishing a photo. And I see that the definition of a "portrait photograph" is critical.
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Old 06-24-2012   #100
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So, is this the Future of Street Photography!
I'm planing to use this as a project just to show the non-sense of these attitudes and Laws.

Hell! I even may use some colours to made distinctions based on Sex, skin color or religion! Just to make it "worst"!

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Old 06-24-2012   #101
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Where are you from? In most of the world, you certainly can take a picture of anything or anyone in public wherever they have no reasonable expectation of privacy.
from germany. "most of the world?" hardly so, it's rather the opposite.
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There's no such thing as personality rights.
thank god there is!
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So, is this the Future of Street Photography!
I'm planing to use this as a project just to show the non-sense of these attitudes and Laws.
you are aware that this is exactly what google had to do with "google earth" in order to be able to pursue the project? microsoft scrapped it altogether after they faced similar law suits.

someone mentioned cartier-bresson ... those were very different times.

there was also a post in this thread where a forum member listed the reasons why somebody wouldn't want to be photographed -- and they were all in the vein of "only people who are mental and/or criminal will object" ... who tells me that the "photographer" isn't a criminal, a sociopath or the like? takes two to tango.

if you ask for permission first, everything should be fine. just because you can do something, doesn't mean that you are permitted to do it.
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Old 06-24-2012   #102
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I don't know about other countries but here in the USA if you are in the public domain you can be photograhed without permission and the images can be posted on the photographers website without getting permission from the person photographed..

You have no reasonable expectation of privacy while in the public domain..
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Old 06-24-2012   #103
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In general I am opposed to the claims of privacy when one is in a public place. If someone doesn't want to be photographed or seen by other people, he should not go to a public place. A photograph wouldn't reveal more private details than what is already seen by hundreds of other passers-by.

I am also pretty sure the law in Germany applies to usage of the pictures, not the actual process of taking them. In other words, you are not forbidden to take them, but restricted as to how to use them.
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Old 06-24-2012   #104
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Starless is correct. The act of photographing someone who is in a public place is not restricted in the USA. Legally, the photographer stands on the right side of the law. But that's not the problem and the gist of the OP.

The problem begins when the photographer is then approached by someone who doesn't like the fact that they have been photographed without their having given prior consent. I have been the photographer in that situation several times. I smile, sometimes nod, and continue shooting in another direction as I slowly walk away. In almost every instance, I have avoided the potential encounter.

However, on the few occasions when I have been encountered, I was pleasant but forceful. I believe it is the photographer's duty, even more than his right, to stand his ground, because that right can be easily lost by not exercising it.
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Old 06-24-2012   #105
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Quote:
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There's no such thing as personality rights.
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Originally Posted by cameosis View Post
thank god there is!
It is only a legislated right, not a natural right, despite attempts by some proponents to justify it on the basis of natural rights. Even if one were to grant for the sake of argument that such a right exists, it's only application in the context of photography is to the commercial use of one's image by someone seeking to profit from it. Because that is the only case in which someone could argue that harm was done to the one photographed.

In no sense could it be argued on the basis of natural rights that a person has a right to stop someone else from photographing them for non-commercial objectives in public. That would be tantamount to claiming that a person has a right not to be seen by others in public. You could legislate such a thing, but there is no natural right argument to support it, nor could you apply it or enforce it.

What you are talking about, denying others the right to photograph what they can see in public, is morally wrong.

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if you ask for permission first, everything should be fine. just because you can do something, doesn't mean that you are permitted to do it.
The crux of the problem is that many people, like you, believe that others have a right to permit or deny them activities that do, in fact, fall within the realm of natural rights. I am permitted, by my own exercise of natural right, to photograph you in public without asking for your permission first, whether you or your State agree or not.
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Old 06-24-2012   #106
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Quote:
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if you ask for permission first, everything should be fine. just because you can do something, doesn't mean that you are permitted to do it.
Fortunately in my country I can, and if I can I'll do it! That's why it's called "Public place"!
Now, can you imagine trying to obtain permission from everyone in the photo?
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Old 06-24-2012   #107
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Quote:
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My question is to all you savvy street shooters, what should our stance be????
There are many different ways to handle the situation:

1) I Speaka No Englesh

2) I'm on a talent search and you were one of my top picks, Cowell won't be very happy with me when I get back to the office.

3) You know how expensive it is to develop this stuff? I'm doing this for free!

4) Hey, you can't just come and talk to me, you should ask permission. I guess we're even.


But I think the best is: 5) I'm sorry, it won't happen again.
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Old 06-24-2012   #108
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Years ago, I had a whole crowd turn into a lynch mob when I tried to photograph a "street preacher" in Knoxville. My attempt to explain my right to make photographs in a public place didn't make much way with ten or twelve true believers.
You should have stood your ground and become martyred for photograhers' rights.


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Old 06-24-2012   #109
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Today I was trying to shoot in the Musee d'Orsay in Paris . I understood that photography was not allowed of the exhibits, but I was aiming my M3 at architecture, and was far from any art. A museum worker came to tell me off. I replied "keep an eye on anyone with a cell phone" -he ignored me.

Cell phones? The place was crawling with big DSLR's with flash, P&S's and iPads!

I went back and took the photo I was after, and more along the way. I didn't see anyone with any of those devices being questioned.

Randy
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Old 06-24-2012   #110
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Just for general information, the situation with regard to photographer's rights in Australia is discussed at length in this article by Andrew Nemeth at 4020.net.
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Old 06-27-2012   #111
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On my first outing with my richo 500 G last weekend,I saw a nice picture,two guys leaning against a bin chatting,overlooking a bridge. I was behind them trying to focus (I'm new to rangefinders) when one of them turned around and saw me,said something about me to his pal,well the scene was gone,so I moved on. 10 minutes later he appeared in front of me and demanded to know why I was taking his picture. I could have spent the the rest of the day trying to explain why I take pictures but i said just because I enjoy printing them. He didn't get it but I suppose he was convinced i wasn't a special agent of some kind intent on spying on him. I don't often do street photography or candid's of strangers and if I'm honest the scene above made me feel a little uncomfortable, not uncomfortable enough to stop though. I'm still sorry I missed the picture though.
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Old 01-23-2013   #112
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This harassment and guilt from taking photos of others is why I have mostly shot photos of things, not people, for most of my photographic life. The few shots of people are family or friends, and even some of the "friends" act like I am pointing a gun at them.

I have pretty bad anxiety, so even reading this thread was tough for me. But, it also helped me to know others have been harassed for trying to take candid moments as well. So in a way it has helped me in that regard.

I would never lie to someone who confronted me or act like I wasn't shooting them, I just would not shoot in their direction at all. And that is why my photography lacks people most of the time.

Part of the issue here too is that I live in a city without a huge crowded downtown area or shopping area with lots of people. I find in that in places with a tourist area or crowded areas, people tend to not pay so much attention to the photographer since there are usually so many folks doing their thing.

I have noticed that what gear I am using does make a difference in how I am perceived. When I have my DSLR and a big lens, I get a lot of "Don't take my photo!" and "Why are you taking my picture!?" and lots of folks who will go out of their way to avoid me.

Yet with my TLRs, no one says a thing. I think maybe it's because I am pointing the camera in the same direction for several minutes not moving as I try to aim and focus. I am pretty slow in that regard, so it always takes me forever.

When I use my phone's camera, no one says a single thing to me as with many of my smaller film cameras.

It's really a shame this is how our world is, as there are so many wonderful people out there who, when not posing or aware of their being captured in that moment, are such rich and wonderful subjects.

I'm working on my anxiety. And trying to learn how to talk to people I don't know so I can ask to take photos. I also have cards printed I carry and will hand to folks to reach me for copies of the photos.

Until I can find a better way to deal with the people side, I will stick to my nature, texture and architectural photos. I want to take more shots of people, but that will just have to come in time I guess.
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Old 01-24-2013   #113
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If I am photographing a person, which is rare, I ask them "can I have a photo?", if they say yes I take one. If I am photographing a group, I just take the photo.

Laws in different parts of the world are different, but here in the U.S. if you are on public property you may be photographed without permission. However I find some photographers confuse a public space with public property. It's worth it to remember that just because there are a lot of people around, doesn't make it public property. As a matter of manners I ask permission to photograph when I want a photograph of a particular person, and not just people as part of a composition.
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Old 01-24-2013   #114
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My stand is: ask, ask, ask and ask, if the answer is not show them some pictures, if the answer is still no just handle to them your business card and go. I understand your passion, I have the same, and I assume you are honest and have good intentions but if you revert the roles you must admit that there are many questionable reasons to want a picture of someone and that the chap was indeed right. You won't lost the "street photography look" just because you asked, the fact you just stopped someone who didn't expect to be stopped and you talked, and insisted, and showed him your portfolio if anything make him kind of proud of himself and let you get an even more interesting pictures.

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Old 01-24-2013   #115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giellaleafapmu View Post
... if you revert the roles you must admit that there are many questionable reasons to want a picture of someone...
GLF
I'm curious what you and others here think these "questionable reasons" might be. I'm wondering what people out on the street would think I'm going to do with their picture that would cause any harm. I suppose they might think I'm going to photoshop them into some sort of compromising tableau, but then they could sue me for all I have. So where's the risk here?

If street photographers had been asking for permission since the beginning of 'street photography', we wouldn't have much to look at these days. People like Winogrand, Moriyama, Meyerowitz, Levitt, etc. would have had to do something else for a living.

My opinion is that I have the right to photograph anything and anyone in what I call the public domain. And, by the way, that includes people that are on private property but could reasonably expect to be seen from the public property (people inside a building with picture windows for example). I want to make images of the world I have to live in and that includes all the other people in it. It'll be a sad day when that right is taken away. Our children and their children will never have a very clear picture of what it was like to live today.

Last edited by Jamie Pillers : 01-24-2013 at 16:40. Reason: misspelling
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Old 01-24-2013   #116
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Certainly it's within our right to shoot whatever we want but if you annoy people you give the photo world a black eye. I've personally seen people with cameras drive people nuts to the point his camera should have been kicked up his a$$. On the other hand I was harassed by a cop simply because I was photographing at a carnival. I was accused by two young girls of photographing them which I was not and showed the cop on my LCD that I had not. The cop continued his aggressive behavior an threatened to take my camera and have me removed from the carnival. He was simply being an a$$ and knew the consequences if he did. I had four witnesses.

It works two ways and I respect personal space whether it's inside the law or not. It reflects on all of us.

A fellow I worked with in college wound up spending a couple of weeks in the hospital because of harassing a couple of prostitutes with his camera. Their pimp came up behind him and grabbed him beating him severely breaking several ribs and broke his jaw while trying to shove the photographers Nikon Ftn into his mouth.

The moral to the story is this could have been any one of us. Inside the law or not doesn't matter. You don't know what kind if nutcase you're dealing with.
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Old 01-24-2013   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68degrees View Post
I like this approach a lot. I ve thought about it as well and thought that if I took photos of strangers, I would do it this way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienmeatsack View Post
...
I'm working on my anxiety. And trying to learn how to talk to people I don't know so I can ask to take photos. I also have cards printed I carry and will hand to folks to reach me for copies of the photos.

Until I can find a better way to deal with the people side, I will stick to my nature, texture and architectural photos. I want to take more shots of people, but that will just have to come in time I guess.
Can I recommend you guys check out the "100 Strangers" group/project on Flickr. I found it a good way to practice my people/portrait skills. I started a long time ago but am only at 56/100 so far. They could use more film shooters, too.

http://www.flickr.com/groups/100strangers/


100 strangers: philip (1/100) by mike thomas, on Flickr
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Old 01-25-2013   #118
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I'm curious what you and others here think these "questionable reasons" might be. I'm wondering what people out on the street would think I'm going to do with their picture that would cause any harm. I suppose they might think I'm going to photoshop them into some sort of compromising tableau, but then they could sue me for all I have. So where's the risk here?

If street photographers had been asking for permission since the beginning of 'street photography', we wouldn't have much to look at these days. People like Winogrand, Moriyama, Meyerowitz, Levitt, etc. would have had to do something else for a living.

My opinion is that I have the right to photograph anything and anyone in what I call the public domain. And, by the way, that includes people that are on private property but could reasonably expect to be seen from the public property (people inside a building with picture windows for example). I want to make images of the world I have to live in and that includes all the other people in it. It'll be a sad day when that right is taken away. Our children and their children will never have a very clear picture of what it was like to live today.
Hi, first of all I wanted to precise that I am well aware that we all have the right to photograph people in public places, just _my_ way is to ask (i think that was the original question), I think that many legal thing, such as burping loudly in a public place, are indeed rude, even if they are legal and I get much better pictures when I ask (probably because I am relaxed as the subject and we work together and not one against the other).

Second, I guess that what one can think someone else might do with a picture is very dependent on the country you are in, unfortunately in some place some people might think that you could point their face to a hitman, try to kidnap them, whatever...

GLF
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Old 01-25-2013   #119
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can you explain the difference between public place and public property and examples?
Public property would be something like a street, sidewalk, or park which is publicly owned. A parking lot on the other hand may be used by the public, but is generally privately owned just for example.
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Old 01-25-2013   #120
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I find it amusing that if anyone in the UK objects to being photographed they are overlooking the fact that they are in a country with one of the highest number of surveillance cameras in the industrialised world.
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