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Spooling 120 into patterson
Old 02-23-2012   #1
agour
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Spooling 120 into patterson

Hey,

Just wondered if anyone has any tips for getting 120 film onto the patterson reels? It just took me half an hour to get one roll on. It kept falling off the reel, or getting stuck and not advancing...

I guess its a good thing I have a lot of patience!


Cheers
-agour
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Old 02-23-2012   #2
mfunnell
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Are they actual, genuine, Patterson reels or generic plastic reels? I ask because I upgraded from the generic cheapies to genuine Patterson ones and it made the world of difference for me.

I'm also going to have a go at stainless steel reels and metal tanks, but I haven't dared yet with 120. I've only just (and only "almost") come to terms with them for 35mm.

...Mike
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Old 02-23-2012   #3
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The 2 patterson tanks are definately genuine. I havent checked the reels themselves, but I would imagine they are also genuine.
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Old 02-23-2012   #4
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Sometimes if you trim the corners that lead into the Paterson reel at an angle they load more easily. 45 degrees or so it's not critical at all.

WRT SS & 120, patience is the answer. The film is a bit more flexible because of the height so a gentle touch needs to be used. IE: Don't squeeze too hard.

I've found that 35 is easy if, after you insert the tongue into the center of the reel,
you stand the reel on edge, put a slight curl in the film you can actually push it on. Try it with a processed/blank roll to try it in the light.
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Old 02-23-2012   #5
kmallick
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It needs practice more than any other trick. But like many others I would suggest practicing outside of the bag or drakroom in the light with a spare 120 roll. I usually cut tiny corners off of the end that I feed in and make sure that the roll is fed in past the bearings (more from touch and feel).

I would also suggest getting the plastic reels with wide feeder mouths like the link below. They fit perfectly in Patterson developer canister:



http://freestylephoto.biz/55043-Aris...el?cat_id=1603
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Old 02-23-2012   #6
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Place a business card spanning across the entry point of the reel. Then slide the film on top of the card and onto the reel.
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Old 02-23-2012   #7
Thardy
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I use those Samigon foolproof reels shown by kmallick above. They make loading 120 film really easy.
You can also find them at BHphoto.com

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...feed_Reel.html
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Old 02-23-2012   #8
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Make sure your hands are completely dry and beware of a build up of humidity if you're using a changing bag. I always load mine in a blacked-out closet.
The other trick is never to push inwards on the two parts of the reel when you're trying to advance the film. It will jam very easily. I always ensure I keep a slight outwards pull on each side of the reel as I rotate the spools.
And yes, a tiny snip to ensure there is no sharp edge on the leading corners of the film will help too.
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Old 02-23-2012   #9
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Years ago I learned on SS reels. Some three years later, reading photo magazines, I decided to get the "easier to use" plastic reels. When they work as advertised, they are indeed nice. When the don't, they are worse than SS. I quickly went back to SS reels and haven't gone back.
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Old 02-23-2012   #10
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I start 120 film into the grooves but do not try to push it past the ratcheting balls. Instead, I take my thumb and forefinger and pull the initial edge of the film through. Then I ratchet the remaining 99% of the 120 roll onto the reel. That has always been bulletproof for me.

35mm I can push through the ratcheting ball mechanism but. 120 I just pull.

Quote:
Originally Posted by agour View Post
Hey,

Just wondered if anyone has any tips for getting 120 film onto the patterson reels? It just took me half an hour to get one roll on. It kept falling off the reel, or getting stuck and not advancing...

I guess its a good thing I have a lot of patience!


Cheers
-agour
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Old 02-23-2012   #11
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x2 with trimming the corners.
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Old 02-23-2012   #12
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I gave up on the Patterson reels and use stainless steel reels again for 120. Even the cheap LPL-made ones are a lot easier to load then the Patterson reels ...
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Old 02-23-2012   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmallick View Post
It needs practice more than any other trick. But like many others I would suggest practicing outside of the bag or drakroom in the light with a spare 120 roll. I usually cut tiny corners off of the end that I feed in and make sure that the roll is fed in past the bearings (more from touch and feel).

I would also suggest getting the plastic reels with wide feeder mouths like the link below. They fit perfectly in Patterson developer canister:



http://freestylephoto.biz/55043-Aris...el?cat_id=1603
I second this. The feeder tabs is much larger in the arista reel than in the paterson, which makes for easier spooling! Its also cheaper than the paterson reel.
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Old 02-23-2012   #14
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Get some Hewes. I cursed those damn plastic things to no end until I switched and now it's smooth sailing!
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Old 02-23-2012   #15
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I use plastic Jobo reels which are probably similar to the Paterson ones. I find that the film feeds better if I reduce the curl of the initial 1cm or so. Actually, just the corners. I bend the corners back, avoiding an angular bend in the film in the opposite direction which might make matters worse.

And I agree with the poster above who says to do it in dry conditions. It I get hot and bothered when a film won't load, I take a few minutes to cool down then try again. It helps if one's hands are washed with soap/detergent and dried thoroughly.
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Old 02-23-2012   #16
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After cursing for 1/2 hour trying to get a roll onto a Paterson reel, I bent the film backwards to create a crease in it, about 1/4 inch from the end. This seemed to straighen the film out enough to allow it to easily slide onto the reel. Since then, I have continued to bend back the film and have not had any further problems in starting off a roll. As this is well before the image bearing areas of the film, I have never had any negative ruined by this crease.
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Old 02-23-2012   #17
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Are your eyes open or closed when trying to load the reels...I find that if you close your eyes they load soooo much easier...also if it's warm out try sticking out your tongue just a bit...
I have no problems with Paterson reels and just started to like SS reels for 120...SS & 35mm don't work for me...
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Old 02-24-2012   #18
agour
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Thanks for the tips, Ill give them a try!

I doubt Ill buy a new spool just yet, keep trying and see how it goes.

Also, I do use your pulling method bob. I just found that even once its past the bearings, it just tends to get stuck or fall off somehow.
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Old 02-24-2012   #19
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Working inside a changing bag can get very warm and sweaty and can make the emulsion a bit sticky, plastic reels seem work much better in a darkroom
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Old 02-24-2012   #20
timor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agour View Post
Hey,

Just wondered if anyone has any tips for getting 120 film onto the patterson reels? It just took me half an hour to get one roll on. It kept falling off the reel, or getting stuck and not advancing...

I guess its a good thing I have a lot of patience!


Cheers
-agour
One more tip. Start spooling from the end, which is taped to the backing. Yes, I first unspool film, disconnect it from the backing and start with the end with this little tape still on film. That gives a bit of stiffness and safe hold on film. Then be careful with the end, as it may have tendency to curl inside.
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Old 02-24-2012   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Michaels View Post
I start 120 film into the grooves but do not try to push it past the ratcheting balls. Instead, I take my thumb and forefinger and pull the initial edge of the film through. Then I ratchet the remaining 99% of the 120 roll onto the reel. That has always been bulletproof for me.

35mm I can push through the ratcheting ball mechanism but 120 I just pull.
Seconded.

Cheers,

R.
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Old 02-24-2012   #22
ferider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayt View Post
x2 with trimming the corners.
x3. For both 120 and 35mm. Makes a big difference.

And for 120, if you've never done it blind, do a dry run in the open.

Roland.
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Old 02-24-2012   #23
emayoh
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Banish moisture! Keep some silica gel packets in your change bag, and handle some dry rice before you do yer spooling.
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Old 02-24-2012   #24
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EXCUSE ME, if I overlooked this in the conversation but, have you tried loading a roll in the light. Waste a roll of film and just practice until you can do it with your eyes closed.
I have always preferred the SS tanks for 120 myself.
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Old 02-24-2012   #25
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I have also spooled from the taped end. Some Rollei and Foma film i had was very springy and the tail end was too tightly wound to want to go on the reel.

Putting the taped end on first (with the tape wrapped around the edge) and trimming the corners made it very easy.
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