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View Poll Results: For how many of your B&W shoot do you use B&W filters?
80% - 100% 113 19.15%
50% - 80% 101 17.12%
25% - 50% 86 14.58%
10% - 25% 68 11.53%
less then 10% 100 16.95%
I never use them 57 9.66%
I don't own any 65 11.02%
Voters: 590. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-19-2011   #76
Chris101
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When I want to really emphasize the 'grunge' aspect to my work, I put an 80B on and shoot b&w. This enhances or creates any skin blems, adds to the sky haze and turns a blue sky white. Downright post-apocalyptic.
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Old 09-19-2011   #77
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I have yellow, orange, red, I did have a green too but I never replaced that one when all my kit was stolen years. I can't remember the last time I used any of them. My guess is around 15 years ago while I was still a cruiseship photographer. Maybe I should start using them again along with the other filters I bought because they seemed like a good idea at the time.
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Old 09-19-2011   #78
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I have yellow and deep orange filters for my lenses, I'd like to try dark red at some point (probably going to see very limited use, as deep orange already gives quite dramatic sky and clouds).

To me it is part of the beauty of a rangefinder system that the view is not affected when mounting filters (for black and white).

The one thing I suggest to ponder, and make up one's own mind about, is to whether one really (and for what aesthetic purpose) wants (leaving skin tones aside, and talking about the sky/clouds) the clouds to "pop" and the sky to be a bit darkened as compared to unfiltered rendering.
I mean this in the following sense: some filtering or exposure strategies are things one may pick up when setting out with photography, because one reads about it a lot, and because it sounds like you miss out on something if you do not do it. Best example for me would be "shadow detail" (and the recommendation of downrating film). It is good to know about that, one should try it, and be able to use it as a workflow or tool.... because one wants to, and because it fits your visual style. It can be perfectly fine though to let the shadows go dark or all black :-)

With filter use for making clouds stand out, I feel it is in a similar way. I have a number of pictures where I am really happy I had filters handy. And yet I know a number of "landscape" pictures in black and white that "work" precisely because the sky (and clouds) do not stand out, do not have texture, but are just plain bright and white. It became most clear to me when seeing a late "landscape" picture of Cartier-Bresson, where the geometrical - if you will - beauty works because the sky is one continuous tone, and the eye is not distracted by counting clouds ;-)

So, I always have filters in my bag, and when the light is not too contrasty already I keep a yellow filter on the lens. And at some point I'll even buy a green filter, for the very rare occasion that a portrait could work with very pronounced skin tones.

Greetings, Ljós
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Old 10-20-2011   #79
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For low light and indoor shots there is no reason to use b/w filters. (Please correct me if I am wrong). I don't shoot b/w in bright sunlight so only a clear filter to protect the lens.
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Old 10-21-2011   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double Negative View Post
No, not really. They'll still do what they're supposed to but it's of dubious worth; if nothing else they'll just rob you of light when you need it most.
I have only ever read about how the clouds will stand out more with yellow or how green affects foliage but I shoot in urban areas usually well past the magic hour so not sure how color filters would work aside from losing a stop.
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Old 10-26-2011   #81
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I also keep yellow on all the time, like dk red for old buildings
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Old 11-16-2011   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spider67 View Post
Orange and Red in then summer
I use red for architecture and orange for landscape. I use a #29 red for IR film, even Efke, which recommends an 89B or greater. FOr people, I either use a yellow filter (for women to smooth skin) or green for men, to add to their 'swarthiness'. For a surreal bleached out, sci-fi look, I put a 80A cooling filter on.
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Old 01-29-2012   #83
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Recently I use an orange filter of some kind for BW with all of my most often used lenses, so I have it in E39, E60, and series VII. Still looking for one in 40.5 and E55...
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Old 01-29-2012   #84
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I keep skylights on all my lenses, to protect the glass. And I have yellows, orange, green and red for most of my lenses. When I shoot color, it's usually digital.

My Minolta SRT lenses have original Skylight and colored Minolta filters, those have been fun to find and acquire. And Kodak Wratten series B&W filters, for all my Canon RF lenshoods, fit just as tightly as the original Canon ones (of which I also have a few).
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Old 04-26-2012   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victory12 View Post
FOr people, I either use a yellow filter (for women to smooth skin) or green for men, to add to their 'swarthiness'.
For mixed group portraits yellow-green seems to be best match?

Last summer I used Y-G as all-around filter in the garden and for people and liked it vs naked lens.
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Old 06-30-2012   #86
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Mostly medium yellow and occasionally red, outdoors. Sometimes I also use yellow-green, but not so often.
I used recently yellow for women portraits and got good results. Might use it again for the same purpose.
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Old 06-30-2012   #87
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I think this thread would benefit greatly from some example shots.

personally, usually use orange, but I'm experimenting with others
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Old 06-30-2012   #88
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Maybe we should consider linear polarizing filters. No shadow detail lose.
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Old 06-30-2012   #89
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I have recently discovered that I just love the way the ND filters deal with the (too) ample Australian sunshine. So, basically, now I have an ND filter on at all times (unless I am taking indoor photos, or it's dark outside).
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Old 07-01-2012   #90
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I usually carry a red and yellow filter. If I am doing outdoor portraiture I'll throw in a green filter.

I have also been known to use a ND filter..
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Old 07-01-2012   #91
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I just recently did a black and white filter test with my Pentax 67 on a bright midday seascape. The Pentax metered well with everything but the dark red filter. You can see the results here.
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Old 07-01-2012   #92
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These days I never use filters as a only shoot digital and can do the adjustment during conversion to B&W.

In my old film days, I used red #25 or #23 and green #11 with some frequency. The green is quite nice on landscapes as it not only darkens sky much like a yellow #8 but also lightens foliage so that it renders a different gray than most tree bark.
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Old 07-01-2012   #93
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I keep medium yellow (K2) filters more or less permanently on the 35 and 24 mm lenses that I do most of my shooting with. Mostly for tone correction, especially subjects where I want to get that right in a b&w print, for example blue plaques in London, and a neighborhood in Tunis that I spent an afternoon in, whitewashed walls with blue doors and trim (without the K2, the blue goes from near-black to dull grey). Also, they punch up overall contrast on the ubiquitous gloomy day in Seattle. Also carry an orange filter for that rare day that's sunny, but with big clouds. This is really old school, but I've been amused by a lot of the commentary around the Monochrom M, which has been positively evangelical about using colored filters with the camera.


I just have to remember to remove them when I'm shooting color. It's been at least a month since I've blown that.
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Old 07-01-2012   #94
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Using a yellow filter benefits skies.
OTOH using a yellow-green filter benefits skies, foliage and skin tones.

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Old 07-02-2012   #95
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What I find interesting is that some of the same people who argue the real world merits of spending ridiculous money to have the best "glass" will so easily degrade their lens by putting a $50 optical element in front of it and never think twice about it.
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Old 07-02-2012   #96
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I think that's a different argument when it comes to UV filters than it is with filters to cut/emphasis different colours of light surely?
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Old 07-14-2012   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by divewizard View Post
I just recently did a black and white filter test with my Pentax 67 on a bright midday seascape. The Pentax metered well with everything but the dark red filter. You can see the results here.
Same here, mine overexposed using the deep red (#29). And I bet it would with a #25 too. The meter is either over or under sensitive to red. I'll have to think for an hour and a half to figure which one.
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Old 08-13-2012   #98
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by divewizard View Post
I just recently did a black and white filter test with my Pentax 67 on a bright midday seascape. The Pentax metered well with everything but the dark red filter. You can see the results here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by charjohncarter View Post
Same here, mine overexposed using the deep red (#29). And I bet it would with a #25 too. The meter is either over or under sensitive to red. I'll have to think for an hour and a half to figure which one.
Somewhere in the Large Format Internet Lore or a book on Large Format Photography, I ran across a table which listed additional filter factors for the red end of the spectrum starting with Orange. In essence, you had to add a stop or two to the red end of the spectrum.

Wayne
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Old 08-13-2012   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charjohncarter View Post
Same here, mine overexposed using the deep red (#29). And I bet it would with a #25 too. The meter is either over or under sensitive to red. I'll have to think for an hour and a half to figure which one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by venchka View Post
Somewhere in the Large Format Internet Lore or a book on Large Format Photography, I ran across a table which listed additional filter factors for the red end of the spectrum starting with Orange. In essence, you had to add a stop or two to the red end of the spectrum.

Wayne
CdS cells are about twice as sensitive to red as they are to blue. Photodiodes are pretty consistent across the the visible spectrum, but drop off around 820 or so. I generally add two stops to an orange filter, three to a #25 and four to #29 if the scene contains minimal red. Golden hour ... subtract up to 2 stops from these numbers. It's all very subjective unless you use a colorimetric instrument.
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Old 08-14-2012   #100
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Since I scan my negatives, I can adjust contrast in CS4. But, that only works for "yellow", and "red" filters. Green filters are another thing.

I don't have or use B&W filters.
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