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giovatony
12-10-2007, 05:05
I been using an old GE PR-1 meter and exposure readings have been just fine but it requires my left hand to use , not to mention having to put it in my pocket before setting the camera and it really slows down the whole process of picture taking.
Lately I have developed an interest in the Sekonik L208 simply because it is small but with large numbers and has a shoe adapter built in and seemingly this makes it much more convenient when mounted on a Zorky or Fed.

Is this a good method or am I not seeing the pitfalls? I`m also concerned that it could make shutter speed adjustments difficult being so close.
I`d like to hear some user comments of better meter/camera techniques that I could develop and use myself.
Thank you,
John

philhirn
12-10-2007, 05:24
Why donīt you try and go without a regular meter reading? Do a reading once before you start to shoot, and then only adjust by a stop or so in different lighting environments (shade, open areas, street). this way, using a handheld meter shouldnt slow you down.

LazyHammock
12-10-2007, 06:54
I use the L-208, it is a great , small meter. My technique is to meter in full sun, in shadow and then use those readings until the lighting appreciably changes. It is a big leap for someone who meters every shot (I know I was that man) but it is very liberating to be able to concentrate on the composition. You will soon be able to compensate for partial shade, backlighting etc. I wouldn't use the meter on the camera - it will definitely slow you down.
Good luck,
Nick

giovatony
12-10-2007, 08:30
Why donīt you try and go without a regular meter reading? Do a reading once before you start to shoot, and then only adjust by a stop or so in different lighting environments (shade, open areas, street). this way, using a handheld meter shouldnt slow you down.

I think you have point in normal lighting situations but yesterday the sun was in and out of the clouds and the light was changing constantly.
Still, I guess I could take less readings and compensate accordingly since print film has so much more latitude.
Thanks for the reply,
John

giovatony
12-10-2007, 08:38
I use the L-208, it is a great , small meter. My technique is to meter in full sun, in shadow and then use those readings until the lighting appreciably changes. It is a big leap for someone who meters every shot (I know I was that man) but it is very liberating to be able to concentrate on the composition. You will soon be able to compensate for partial shade, backlighting etc. I wouldn't use the meter on the camera - it will definitely slow you down.
Good luck,
Nick

Sounds reasonable . I been metering every shot as I`m actually a newbie at metering (recent FSU camera user)and I expect to get more acclimated to it / more experience.
I have noticed that I needed less exposure adjustments as I would have thought was necessary so maybe I could do with less metering .
I just need more practice.
Thanks for your reply.
John

dazedgonebye
12-10-2007, 08:41
I use the L-208, it is a great , small meter. My technique is to meter in full sun, in shadow and then use those readings until the lighting appreciably changes. It is a big leap for someone who meters every shot (I know I was that man) but it is very liberating to be able to concentrate on the composition. You will soon be able to compensate for partial shade, backlighting etc. I wouldn't use the meter on the camera - it will definitely slow you down.
Good luck,
Nick

I felt the same sort of liberation when I went to using AE on the R3A. ;)

Metering every shot is a hard habit to let go of.

LazyHammock
12-10-2007, 08:50
Metering every shot is a hard habit to let go of.

Agreed Steve, it was a struggle at first but to have a viewfinder free of little lights was worth it. AE is a whole different kettle of fish though!
Nick