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grainy_shadows
08-27-2007, 06:15
hello, my first posting =)

i have recently acquired some velvia 50, i have never used it or any other iso50 film for that matter.

i know people usually use velvia for landscapes, but what conditions is it best to use velvia 50?

if used for street shooting, what will the outcomes be like?

i use a bessa r + 35mm f2.5 skopar, but also a slr + 50mm f1.4, would i be better off using the slr? it just seems the lower iso is abit slow for the 35mm lens

overall i would just like some tips and trick about using velvia, i havent used slide/colour neg film in a while, black and white all the way, feels more liberating!

but upon seeing some nice chrome scans on flickr, i wanna give colour a try again

thanks, david

btw this is a great forum!!!!!!!!!!!!!

mfogiel
08-27-2007, 06:24
Use it in lower contrast scenes, i.e. on overcast days. If you use it in bright sunshine, you have to be careful to expose for the highlights, i.e. with your in camera metering it would be better to underexppose 1/2 to 1 stop (bracketing helps).

IMHO this is not the right film for street shooting and people shooting in general, because too slow and because the skin tones come out too saturated, However, this is the most contrasty, saturated and highest resolving colour film, so its natural scope are tripod landscape shots - I am sure your skopar will deliver nice photos with this film.

nikon_sam
08-27-2007, 06:34
Color, Color, Color...look for it when you use this film...
I have used it in my Nikon FE, on a tripod, @50 ASA (-1/2 stop)
The FE would always get the shot...
I use it mainly on Landscapes, flowers, sunsets...
If you find that winning shot...shoot an extra frame...the best duplicate is a second original...

J J Kapsberger
08-27-2007, 06:39
Velvia is a film which emphasizes primary colors, dare I say at the expense of pastel colors (i.e., the in-between colors). The exaggeration of the primary colors and its inherent contrast give Velvia a heck of a lot of punch. Use Velvia when the desired outcome is vibrancy and maximum impact instead of subtlety.

It's not the easiest portrait film to use, as it tends to exaggerate the red in skin tones, which can be very unbecoming for your subject. This tendency can leave your subject's skin looking splotchy or the overall complexion unnaturally pink. Many (including yours truly) find it too sharp, too contrasty for portraiture.

In bright scenes (e.g., direct sunlight), expect very dark shadows especially if you've exposed for the highlights. In direct sunlight, highlights are very easily blown away.

Those are my personal caveats when using Velvia. Don't let them put you off. Velvia's a stunning film. For example, if you use it for street photography on a day when the sunlight isn't too strong (say, under a light overcast sky) and if your scene has strong primary colors, your chromes will knock your socks off.

Try it. You'll have great fun with it.

sienarot
08-27-2007, 08:12
In regards to shooting people with Velvia, I've heard the term "boiled lobster" on more than on occassion.

SolaresLarrave
08-27-2007, 08:24
I don't like Velvia. It's too intense for my taste. As for "tricks" for using it... I cannot think of any. In fact, I cannot think of any film that needs "tricks" at all. There are the classic exposure tips (highlights for slide film, middle tones for print and darks for B&W), but any "trick" would have a particular outcome and, when it comes to Velvia, all outcomes lead to ultra-saturated colors.

What is it exactly you want in a photo taken with Velvia?

Sorry, don't want to sound too cranky. It's simply that the hype about Velvia is... hype, as saturated as its colors.

grainy_shadows
08-27-2007, 09:19
since i got my bessa, i have only used bw film and taken streetscape photos

i brought some velvia because i wanted to try it, heard and read some much about it

=)

Tuolumne
08-27-2007, 09:55
How does Velvia 50 compare with Kodachrome 64? I always thought that Kodachrome was the king of high saturation high contrast photography.

/T

J J Kapsberger
08-27-2007, 10:10
Velvia has much higher saturation and contrast. K-64 gives realism with evenness across the spectrum--primary and secondary colors--and very good shadow detail. Velvia gives punch with the emphasis on primary colors and jet black, super deep shadows.

Tuolumne
08-27-2007, 10:23
Velvia has much higher saturation and contrast. K-64 gives realism with evenness across the spectrum--primary and secondary colors--and very good shadow detail. Velvia gives punch with the emphasis on primary colors and jet black, super deep shadows.

Ummm...sounds like the worst qualities of KR-64 without any of the benefits. Why are people so krazy about this film?


/T

sienarot
08-27-2007, 10:46
I've seen some great stuff taken with Kodachrome 64T, however people who are really into this film are likely into it for completely different reasons than Velvia 50.

IMO, the (general) difference between Fujichrome and Kodachrome: Kodak produces much more realistic and natural looking colours, while Fuji is more vibrant and saturated.

J J Kapsberger
08-27-2007, 10:56
Ummm...sounds like the worst qualities of KR-64 without any of the benefits. Why are people so krazy about this film?


/T

Now, now. let's keep an open mind. Velvia does in fact share some of K-64's benefits, namely superlative sharpness and extremely fine grain. Although Velvia doesn't give the 'realism' that K-64 does, it nonetheless offers something K-64 doesn't, which is super vibrant colors.

I like Velvia because I like deep, rich, vibrant colors. There's nothing like viewing a properly exposed Velvia chrome on the light table. It's spectacular. In many applications a comparison of shots of the same image taken with Velvia and K-64 will leave K-64 looking rather dull.

Of course, this is not to say that Velvia is better for every possible application. Horses for courses.

As for the deep shadows and high contrast: as you know, contrast is an important element in creating the impression of sharpness. Velvia's contrast, when harnessed, can really make for a super sharp image especially in landscape and other scenic type photography.

oscroft
08-27-2007, 11:14
I've used a lot of Velvia 50 over the years, and I agree 100% with J J Kapsberger's description of it. I've used it mostly when traveling in SE Asia, and if you want to capture the vibrant colours of, say, a Thai temple, a Hindu festival, an open-air fruit market, or a tropical seascape, it achieves it with dramatic style.

i use a bessa r + 35mm f2.5 skopar, but also a slr + 50mm f1.4, would i be better off using the slr? it just seems the lower iso is abit slow for the 35mm lens
If you're shooting in dull conditions, being restricted to f/2.5 might be a bit limiting, but if you have reasonably bright light I think you should be OK - I've used Velvia 50 (and even Kodachrome 25) quite a bit in the dull UK with lenses no faster than f/3.5.

J J Kapsberger
08-27-2007, 11:26
Grainy-Shadows,

Here's my tip: if you're curious about Velvia, pick some up and try it. Only you can decide for yourself. Our opinions are just words.

I find that Velvia scans very easily. I look forward to seeing your posted test shots.

Rob-F
08-27-2007, 11:33
Shoot a test roll to establish your personal exposure index for your camera. Although some of us do shoot velvia at ISO 50, there those who shoot it at 40, and even some who shoot it at 32. At 50, it has more tolerance for overexposure than for underexposure. However, the color is more saturated at 50. I've shot the same scene at 50, 40, and 32. While it didn't look overexposed at 32, I preferred the ones taken at 40 and 50. Slight differences in exposure meter calibration and metering technique, however, could easily mean that in the case of a different photographer and camera, a slightly lower index (say, 40) would give a better result. So waste a test roll, bracketing several exposures, on various scenes, and keep them for reference.

grainy_shadows
08-27-2007, 19:17
thanks for your help guys, people on this forum seems so supportive

i will post some pics when i use and develop it =)

sepiareverb
08-28-2007, 11:37
Velvia really shines at making a dull yet bright day look stunning. I'll second the caveats about using it under full sun- the shadows do get black. It is a contrasty film- think grade 4 in b&w printing- but excells (as stated above) at making those colors pop. Note that Velvia pulls pretty well to 32 and sometimes 25- which can control contrast- but testing is needed. I used to shoot a lot of Velvia 50 for stock photo slides and had to retest every bach for pulling- not all of it pulled to 25 equally well. Note my 'normal' ISO was 40 and I always ran it minus 1/3.